How much do tires affect speed?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by JoelTGM, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    So, you're assuming you can see everything from your seat. Interesting. You're really mystified that someone else's experience with a tire didn't match yours. Hmmm. I guess everyone doesn't follow you.
     


  2. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    ... It's because of the latter I was asking. Ive ridden in a ton of places in Europe, including a decade or so in the crappy weather of northern England - in addition to a fair number of years in NorCal and never really saw a need for anything resembling a slimmed down touring tire and because of this I've always gone for a tire that's offered more grip than one that maybe offered an extra month or so of tread life or a bit of extra puncture protection. But never mind since you're not one for sharing how the tire "failed" I'll leave it at that.
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I guess your needs aren't universal, eh? Here's a repeat of what I said. Perhaps reading it a second time will get through: "They provided inadequate protection against debris on the road. As such the need to patch the tubes inside them negated any grip or Crr advantage." Let me sum it up for you: they flatted far too often compared to other tires I've used. Additionally, although not stated originally, their sidewalls cut far too easily. You might be surprised to learn that others have also not got on well with GP4000s tires. Heck, it's even possible that greater cycling legends than you get on well with GP 4 Seasons or even other tires. Imagine that. The GP4000s is a good tire for a lot of people. That doesn't make it the supreme tire. You might also be interested to know that there are people that don't ride the same bike as you, use different brakes and saddles, and wear different shorts and shoes.
     
  4. carbonlifeform

    carbonlifeform New Member

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    It may have taken years of deliberation, but I think I can summarize that more succinctly: Road junk.
     
  5. Henrywrites

    Henrywrites Member

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    First of all, you are using your energy to ride the bike which is very important and the thing we have to understand about the tyres of a bike is that using lighter ones help in improving the speed as you ride. So, try to use your current tyre since you've got a nice tyres as well.
     
  6. Henrywrites

    Henrywrites Member

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    The type of road that we decide to ride on can significantly affect our ride and it is probably the same confusion that is affecting the poster. I hope he must have gotten a clearer explanation on which is the best way to go about this.
     
  7. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Originally there was only a single armored bicycle tire - it was made by Specialized and cost a fortune and the shape isn't very good for modern rims. Then along came the Gatorskin and everyone changed to it. Today there are a half dozen tire manufacturers that make them. My favorite is the Michelin "Endurance" series in several grades but all of which seem to be bulletproof save for fine wires.
     
  8. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    If your commuting to work you have to realize that you don't want a flat going to work because then you'll have to take 5 to 15 minutes, depending on how good you are at fixing flats, to fix the flat, and lightweight tires that may be a bit faster are also going to be more subject to flats.

    So the best tire for rolling resistance use only 7.7 watts but has nothing for flat protection, while the worse tire uses about 28 watts but has more flat protection but rides like a brick but will wear like iron, that is a very noticeable difference in how the bike will feel. But you're not going to want to ride on the 7.7 watt tires because they'll flat and cut like crazy plus not last very long, and the 28 watt tires will feel sluggish and harsh so you have to find a good compromise, good flat protection and good rolling resistance.

    Recently I've been trying out the Specialized Roubaix Pro tires and I REALLY like these, they have great flat protection as I have tested by running over a field of glass that was scattered on the road I was riding on, I was highly concerned of course, but no flats or even a cut; and they roll easy, plus they're smooth riding and handle great. If these tires continue to be good and last a long time I may never buy another tire brand again unless of course Specialized changes things and makes the tire worse which they done before as most tire companies will do. My previous best tire was the Vittoria Rubino Pro, these were really good tires to but the Specialized are more comfortable to ride on.

    If flats are a huge concern for you, you can always add a liner to the tires, especially the rear since that's where 99% of the flats happen. I'm running the Specialized without liners just to see how they'll hold up, but that's all my road bike not my commuter bike.

    My commuter bike I use a cheap pair of Panasonic Panaracer Stratus tires with liners that have worked out very well for the last 4 years of commuting on them, not cuts, no flats, and they wear like iron, yet the ride is reasonable. Those tires are no longer in production, but I think they changed the name to Closer Plus.

    On my touring bike though I wanted a tank of a tire because I'm hauling an additional 50 pounds of weight and the last thing I want is a flat because I have to remove the panniers and fight with the fenders a bit so I went with Schwabe Marathon Greenguard tires, these weigh a lot but they roll nicely so you don't even really notice that they're heavy.

    Anyway, you have to weigh out what you want in a tire, if you want speed but have really good flat protection I recommend the Specialized Roubaix Pro, it those are too expensive for you find a tire like the Panaracer Closer Plus, add a liner and you're good to go. If you want a bullet proof tire, which in your case may be an overkill, than get the Schwalbe Marathon Greenguard tire. There are lot of good tires on the market these days, the ones I mentioned is what I've used lately and had success with, and in no way am I implying their the best and only choice, except for the Schwalbe for touring, I don't believe there is a finer tire for that purpose.

    I do know you need to stay away from Hutchinson tires, I had a set of Intensive II's, which is recent tire still in production, and the center smooth part of the tread literally began to peel off like a recap tire you see trucks lose! And after looking on the internet about these tires doing this it appears their entire line is doing that. I've never ever in over 55 years of riding bikes, from using the cheapest tires when I was kid to expensive tires and everything in between never had a tire peel like that, and I had a few bad ones but those Hutchinson's were and are the worst.
     
  9. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    That's going over the line isn't it? A good tire is a good tire. If you like one, that's fine - that doesn't make others crap. I happen to like Michelin's for several reasons - lab tests show them to have minimal rolling resistance. Not that that makes much difference since rolling resistance at 17 mph or higher is an insignificant part of the frictional losses. But I also like the way they ride, particularly as tubeless.
     
  10. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FYI ...

    MY experience is that Hutchinson used to have very good customer service, so I presume that is still the case ...

    The delaminated tread qualifies as a manufacturing flaw AND if you had sent (or, if you still have them then if you were to send) the delaminated tires back to Hutchinson then they would have sent you replacement tires ...

    You simply need to contact them with a description of the situation ...

    They will probably want you to send the defective tire back ...

    I can't make any promises, but would expect you to receive replacements for the damaged tire(s).



     
  11. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Quite a few of the "armored" carcass tires will delaminate if you cut them. I believe this is why Michelin developed the Power Endurance tire which I originally saw advertised as not doing that. I tried many brands of tires and the only ones that I haven't had delamination problems or short wear or being easy to cut are the Continental Gatorskins which have about 40% or so higher rolling resistance and pretty bad roadfeel. So you can put up with the delamination problem if it only occurs around bad cuts - just watch where you're riding.
     
  12. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Alfeng, thanks for the tip! I did email them but got no response, so I'll try again, I have the tires in the garage in the waste can, haven't dumped the can yet so I can still get them.

    As far as I can tell the tires were not cut and they are delaminating in several areas not just one. Again this does seem to be a problem though that a slew of other users are having with various models of Hutchinson tires.

    I was also a victim of several Conti tires with sidewall issues because they are too thin and don't hold up well to street use. I will never buy another Conti road tire, though their MTB tires seem to be quite good. Just my experiences with Conti tires; they're just too expensive to be buying and not having them last long due to fatal sidewall damage. No, there are better tires than Conti on the market for road tires.
     
  13. Fang

    Fang New Member

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    Without the friction of the tires, your bicycle is difficult to stop.
     
    Chuckabutty likes this.
  14. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    LMAO!!!
     
  15. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    That's really a racing tire and can't be expected to perform well with sport riding on normal roads.
     
  16. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Gatgorskins are sort of famous for getting sidewall flats. I've never had any delamination with them on the rolling surface but then I've never had any problems with punctures or cuts either.
     
  17. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Well, sure it sounds funny but there is a rather large difference in the traction of the compounds of the tires you are using. Not that it makes a whole lot of difference unless you corner or brake hard. Racing tires use a soft compound to corner hard and they wear out rapidly. Using Gatorskins I could generally get 2,000 - 3,000 miles on a set. And I weigh 185 lbs and I do not think anything of riding on gravel roads or dirt trails with my road bike.
     
  18. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    All I can say, which I said before, I really like the Specialized Roubaix tires, I have a feeling these will be the best non racing tire I've ever had.
     
  19. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Any addition to speed because weight of tires is totally lost in the noise Bike and rider weigh say 200 lbs. Explain how 20 grams is going to make any difference.
     
  20. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Supposedly 20 grams is rotational weight and not static weight, and the loss of rotational weight is what really improves performance...BUT...10 per wheel is like you said, nothing, maybe if you were doing a 24 hour race it might matter by about 10 seconds which could mean the difference between winning and losing, but for us mere mortals it means nothing.
     
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