How much should one spend on a bicycle?



A

Ablang

Guest
I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
used) bike?

I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.

I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
more than 10 miles one way).
 
B

bdbafh

Guest
On May 5, 9:26 pm, Ablang <[email protected]> wrote:
> I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?
>
> I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
> I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
> I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
> more than 10 miles one way).


From your post, it sounds to me as if you intend to lock the bike up
at times.
How much would you care if when you returned, it was not where you had
locked and left it ... and you had to start over again looking for
another bike?
There is your starting point.

Piece of **** bikes get stolen from the train station as well.
I had one that was barely able to get me less than 2 miles each way,
and it didn't last a month of commuting before it was gone. That thief
did me a favor.

used - try craiglist.org for the beater.
then get yourself a nicer one that you don't lock up and leave for
exercise, after you're sure that you're going to use it.

-bdbafh
 
P

Patrick Lamb

Guest
On Mon, 5 May 2008 18:26:05 -0700 (PDT), Ablang <[email protected]>
wrote:
>I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
>wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
>used) bike?
>
>I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
>I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
>I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
>more than 10 miles one way).


As much as you're comfortable with?

You can get a decent bike from an LBS starting around $300, I guess,
for a rigid mountain bike. I think I saw a touring bike online for
$700 or $800 the other day (sorry, I don't remember where) that looked
pretty decent. You can spend up to $1,000-$1,200 for a more popular
brand of touring bike (or other road bike) and still not be
over-paying. You might decide you'd outgrown such a cheap bike after
a year or three, but I think you could live with it -- as long as it's
from a bike store, it's a bike; if it's from XMart, it's probably a
Bicycle Shaped Object (BSO), not to be confused with a Real Bike.

If I were starting over and in your shoes, I'd look for the touring
bike. It's still a road bike, and those really do roll easier than
the mountain bike on a street or road; if you're 10 miles from the
store, you'll quickly learn to appreciate that. Also, you can rig up
a way to carry things on a touring bike that might be more difficult
on a "racing" road bike.

BTW, thanks for asking a bicycle-related question! This should
generate some interesting, on-topic discussion.

Pat


Email address works as is.
 
P

Pat

Guest

>I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?


Here's the problem: getting into riding a bike again, especially as an
adult, brings back all those great memories you had as a kid. It's fun, it's
liberating, it's just cool! So, you had a bike that brought you enjoyment
and you really, really liked riding it. So, one day, you think of riding it
to the store. You get there and the realization is....what do I do with my
new bike while I'm in the store? Where will I lock it up? Will it attract
thieves?

You then know you need a bike that's not too attractive to thieves but is
still reliable and relatively fun to ride: a "beater bike." But, it won't
satisfy your new-found need to just get out and have fun and ride
everywhere! Ergo, you need a better bike!

Yep, you'll eventually need two bikes! The "store" bike will be utilitarian
but it won't satisfy your need to fly....

Get the beater bike, the used mountain bike or used touring bike, first. As
you ride more and more, you'll see what I mean about getting the "better
bike" as well. Sigh. That's just the way it goes. But, a few months down the
line, you'll also know more about what you want in a bike. You'll have some
education that comes with experience in adult bikes. Dreaming about the
"better bike" is half the fun of riding the utility bike. And then when you
get the "better bike", you'll really be satisfied.

Pat in TX
 
B

Bob

Guest
On May 5, 8:26 pm, Ablang <[email protected]> wrote:
> I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?
>
> I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
> I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
> I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
> more than 10 miles one way).


Are you already an experienced rider who knows what size frame you
need, what kind of shift system you prefer, and are on a first name
basis with a good bike wrench? I doubt it or you wouldn't be asking
the question. <g> If your shopping will consist mostly of perusing
craigslist or ebay, I'd suggest you rule out buying a used bike
because I doubt you have the necessary knowledge base to ask the right
questions of the seller. That's not intended as an insult. We all have
different areas of competence. When it was time for me to buy a new
laptop lots of people directed me to the Web to look for used
computers- at least until I asked them, "The seller says it has
Windows 2000. Does that come with screens and storms?" ;)
OTOH, if you run across what looks like a decent garage sale bike
("decent" in most garage sales means a bike that is a comfortable if
not necessarily perfect fit, rust free, and tires that aren't rotting
away) for $10 - $20 then what do you have to lose?
As for having it stolen, if you live in an urban area I know of only
two ways to avoid being the victim of a bike thief.
1- Don't own a bike.
2- Never *EVER* let it out of your sight or, better yet, your grasp.
The way most approach the problem of bike theft is to take reasonable
precautions, buy insurance (if the bike is expensive), and hope for
the best.

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
S

SMS

Guest
Ablang wrote:
> I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?
>
> I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
> I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
> I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
> more than 10 miles one way).


I'd advise the Schwinn World Avenue One Commuter Bike from Performance.
It's a good choice for rides to the store, with fenders, chain guard,
and included rear rack. It often goes on sale for $400, then you can get
another 10% in a rebate by joining Team Performance.

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=24141

There's always a risk of theft leaving a bicycle outside a store. If
that's a huge concern then get a folding bicycle that you can put inside
a grocery cart.
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]m>,
Ablang <[email protected]> writes:

> I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?


I don't trust used handlebars.

If I bought a used bike, the first thing I'd do
with it would be to replace the handlebar with
a new one. That pretty much means replacing all
the shifter & brake inner cables too. A new broom
sweeps clean.

The next consideration is wheels -- especially the
rims. Old-skool chrome rims don't stop worth a
hill of lima beans in the rain. You want aluminum-
alloy rims. If a used road bike comes with antient
27" wheels, you may or may not have trouble obtaining
replacements for them. You could replace them with
current 700c wheels, but you might also have to replace
the brakes -- which isn't a bad thing, because old-timer
27"-wheeled bikes generally came with single-pivot brakes
which were adequate, but modern dual-pivots are such an
improvement.

I avoid used French bikes with their weird,
quasi-proprietory standards, unless they have
desirable components I want to cannibalize, and
then consign the rest of the bike to recycling.

Italian and some Swiss bikes can be problematic
in that regard, too. Beware of cottered cranks
(although I do appreciate the slender beauty of
steel cranks.)

> I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
> I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
> I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
> more than 10 miles one way).


As for security, combine a U-lock with a cable-lock
to secure the U-lock. I can't guarantee your bike
will be safe from thieves, but the more we do to
frustrate 'em, the better.

I really suggest getting a nice, new, inexpensive
bike from a proper bike shop. You'll have the
pleasure of having something immediately ridable,
a more current upgrade path, and a warrantee or two
(one from the mfg, and one from the shop.)

A /good/ bike costs some amount of money, and there's
just no honest way around it.


cheers,
Tom
--
Nothing is safe from me.
I'm really at:
tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
S

Stephen Harding

Guest
Ablang wrote:
> I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?
>
> I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
> I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
> I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
> more than 10 miles one way).


I think you can now get a very good bike from the LBS
at entry level prices (~$250).

"Bike" meaning mountain bike or hybrid. Seems road bikes
will run you much higher. Sounds like the mountain bike or
hybrid is just what you're looking for.

I think the higher priced bikes largely get you lighter
weight although it also means longer travel suspension forks,
perhaps disk brakes and an extra cog or two of gears.

Buy entry level or close to it. Then, if you really get
into it, or find you really do need more capability, upgrade.

The first bike then becomes the "around town beater" and the
upgrade is the "joy bike". You haven't really lost a penny!


SMH
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
"> Ablang <[email protected]> wrote:

>>I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
>>wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
>>used) bike?
>>
>>I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
>>I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>>
>>I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
>>more than 10 miles one way).


Separate these two things out. Bike for getting daily exericse and bike for
going to the store.

Get a beater bike for going to the store. Buy used or get a LBS $200-300
bike.

As for daily exercise: this is important. Get a bike that will give you room
to grow. Don't take it ot the store if you have to worry about it getting
stolen. Get a nice touring model for long distance riding, or get one that
is stiff if you think you might want to go fast. This is your weekend
warrior bike and your after/before work exercise/training tool. Spend $800
to $1500 or so.
 
L

landotter

Guest
On May 5, 8:26 pm, Ablang <[email protected]> wrote:
> I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?
>
> I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
> I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
> I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
> more than 10 miles one way).


The local craigslist index shows $100 for a used but good 10 y/o
hybrid, $250 for an as new Giant Sedona or similar hybrid. Varies by
season. Last fall it was about 70% of that. Under $300 gets you last
years unused bike somebody bought for $500.
 
J

Jeff

Guest
Ablang wrote:
> I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?
>
> I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
> I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
> I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
> more than 10 miles one way).

That's a rather philosophical question.

A few years back, I was going back to school. I bought a beater for
about $100 so I could bike to class (downtown, not the best of
neighbourhoods). It didn't take many trips by bike to pay for it
(parking $5, roundtrip bus $4). After that, everything was gravy.

The beater was okay, but not a great bike. After commuting a lot by
bike for several years without incident, I forked out about $500 for a
decent new bike with fenders and a rack and panniers. It's much more
pleasant to ride than the beater. It will pay for itself in a couple
more months (parking is now $8, and bus roundtrip is now $4.50). Then
everything will be gravy again.

You might consider getting two bikes - one for fun rides and one for
commuting. Make the latter a beater and see how committed you are to
cycling. If you use a beater a lot, spending a bit more might be
worthwhile. If you don't use it much, you haven't spent much.
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
On Mon, 5 May 2008 18:26:05 -0700 (PDT), Ablang <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
>wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
>used) bike?
>
>I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
>I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
>I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
>more than 10 miles one way).


My first road bike cost $90. I was clearing $125 per week.

My next road bike cost $200. I was clearing maybe $100 in a good
week. It was new and upgraded when it was stolen. I'd had it for
about month.

The next road bike was all Campagnolo Record and Reynolds 531. All
new, ~$350 with an extra pair of lightly used race wheels. My wages
still totalled $100 per week, or less, but working for peanuts in a
bike shop had its advantages. Five years later, when it was stolen,
my monthly wages were about $1500 at union job.

The next full campy bike was built-up on a 3 year old used frame. It
was $2011 while I was earning about ~$1200 per month at the job I
wanted. I sold the car and spent the next year riding it on ~$800
per month unemployment insurance.

I rode it to work the year after that and dumped $3028 into an all
new, all Euro, semi-custom touring bike. A full week's wage was $600
clear but there were days and weeks without work too.

Twenty years later, I still have those bikes and about 7 others
ranging from free to somewhat less than a month's salary. Today my
bike budget comes from bike shop garbage. By converting old tires,
freewheels, chain and spokes into wearable art I can sell more than I
care to make but it's almost like free money for bike spending.
--
zk
 
A

Art Harris

Guest
Ablang wrote:
> I know that a lot of details would factor into this, but I am
> wondering what bicycle enthusiasts consider when buying a new (or
> used) bike?
>
> I guess I don't want to underspend and end up w/ a piece of cra*, but
> I also don't want to overspend and risk having it get stolen.
>
> I would like to use it for daily exercise and going to the store (not
> more than 10 miles one way).


That's a tough question to answer without knowing more about you and
how much riding you would do.

Would the daily exercise rides be 5 miles or 30 miles? Will you be
riding in urban, suburban, or rural areas? Flat, hilly, or rolling
terrain? On paved roads only, or occasional dirt paths?

If you're just getting into riding, you might do well with a "hybrid"
bike like this:
http://brandscycle.com/itemdetails.cfm?catalogId=39&id=8943

A used bike might save you some money, but if you're not bike savvy
you might get an inappropriate bike, or one that needs work. Avoid
department store bikes like the plague. A good bike shop will help you
choose the right bike in the right size, and will set it up properly
for you.

Remember, riding for exercise might not be fun. But riding for fun can
be great exercise! Local bike clubs might have information on good
cycling routes in your area. Try to develop a variety of scenic routes
and destinations to keep it interesting.

Good luck,
Art Harris
 
I

It's Chris

Guest
Personally? I look for the best frame I can afford in quality, fit and
suitability to my riding, then make sure it has good quality components
on it. As they wear out, as they eventually do, I upgrade as I replace
them. This also keeps the value of the bike from diminishing as much
with time.

- -
Compliments of:
"Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

If you want to E-mail me use:
ChrisZCorner "at" webtv "dot" net

My website:
http://geocities.com/czcorner
 
A

Ablang

Guest
Thanks for all the responses, guys.

I would mainly just use a bike for paved roads to go to the store. I
already have a cheap beater bike, a Magna that I use to go to the
stores with, usually about 2 miles one way and it takes me about 20
mins to do so. It's a inefficient bike, but still easier than a
Huffy. Bike riding has to be easier.

Someone here recommended a hybrid bike, and I believe that is an
excellent recommendation. The '08 Trek 7000 is just in my price range
too... Not more than $350. I'm going to a bike store soon.

I am 5'4" and about 130-150 lbs. What size bike am I looking for?
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Ablang <[email protected]> writes:
> Thanks for all the responses, guys.
>
> I would mainly just use a bike for paved roads to go to the store. I
> already have a cheap beater bike, a Magna that I use to go to the
> stores with, usually about 2 miles one way and it takes me about 20
> mins to do so. It's a inefficient bike, but still easier than a
> Huffy. Bike riding has to be easier.
>
> Someone here recommended a hybrid bike, and I believe that is an
> excellent recommendation. The '08 Trek 7000 is just in my price range
> too... Not more than $350. I'm going to a bike store soon.


I think you've made exactly the right decision.

> I am 5'4" and about 130-150 lbs. What size bike am I looking for?


It's really better to just let the bike shop guys match the
appropriately sized bicycle to you.

The appropriately sized bicycle may seem a little large to you,
especially if, when stopping, you like to put a foot on the
ground while remaining seated. That likely won't be possible
on a properly sized bicycle; you'd have to stand up off the
saddle and straddle the bike to put a foot down. The benefit
is: you'll get maximum leg extension, allowing you to put more
power to the pedals, and do much better than 6 MPH. As you
say: bike riding has to be easier.

Anyways, at 5'4", I'm picturing something @ a 16" frame.
I could be wrong, though. It's really better to just let
the bike shop guys match the appropriately sized bicycle
to you.


cheers & good rides,
Tom

--
Nothing is safe from me.
I'm really at:
tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
A

Ablang

Guest
On May 11, 12:26 pm, Ablang <[email protected]> wrote:
> Thanks for all the responses, guys.
>
> I would mainly just use a bike for paved roads to go to the store. I
> already have a cheap beater bike, a Magna that I use to go to the
> stores with, usually about 2 miles one way and it takes me about 20
> mins to do so. It's a inefficient bike, but still easier than a
> Huffy. Bike riding has to be easier.
>
> Someone here recommended a hybrid bike, and I believe that is an
> excellent recommendation. The '08 Trek 7000 is just in my price range
> too... Not more than $350. I'm going to a bike store soon.
>
> I am 5'4" and about 130-150 lbs. What size bike am I looking for?


I wouldn't use this beater bike to go more than 4 miles round trip. I
get very tired w/ this bike.

I forgot to say that I wanted a better bike in the event that I wished
to bike to a store farther away. I always lock my bike up, no matter
how cheap it is, but I'm worried about parts being stolen off it
anyway or punk kids letting air out of my tires.
 
A

Ablang

Guest
Look what my friend had to say about this bike:

--

(I meant front wheel suspension -springs- not rear wheel.) That bike
has
a spring under the seat known as a seatpost suspension. I've never
seen
them before I saw the one your looking at. I completely forgot about
the bike I have and I'm not trying to steer you to buy from me. I was
just saying for 300.00 you should be able to find a bike with a shock
absorbing suspension, probably used but a very good bike. Craigslist
stuff
with a front suspension spring in the forks.

Did you check that link ? albeit the complainers were all tall or
heavy that didn't like them (seatpost springs), your mileage may vary.
Bottom line is that the bike won't work well on trails as a mountain
bike.
It's strictly a commute bike. That seatpost spring might spoil a
perfectly
good bike in that sense. And that is costing ya a bit more for that.

My bike is a 100 dollar bike. That's what I paid for it and that's
about
all its worth.

Sorry for the confusion.

--

What I said:

Pardon my ignorance w/ bikes, but I don't understand anything
about
what you just said. Guess I'll have to try it out in the store in
person
someday.

I assume the bike you want to sell me is superior to the Trek?

--

> May want to have a look at this before you buy .. Not too many
> are fond of the seatpost suspension...
>
> http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index.php/t-60039.html
>
> Also that's quite steep for a bike with not even rear wheel
> Suspension. Maybe I'm thinking used, but hey.


--

What I said:

> I'm thinking about getting this one.
>
> http://brandscycle.com/itemdetails.cfm?catalogId=39&id=8943