How often do you get a new bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Uawadall, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Froze, I'm a little lanky and still buy an undersize frame and dial it in with more seatpost, more saddle setback and a longer stem in order to get my front end lower.

    I slam stems or run a 5 MM spacer, tops.

    Even a 'bad' fit can often be dialed in although it might look a bit weird to my eye.

    Scandium is used to mitigate the heat affected zone at the weld joints. It lessens the embrittlement at the joint, but only if alloyed in sufficient percentage and only to 'xx%' degree if alloyed in sufficient quantity. Many tubing manufacturers did not use enough Scandium in their alloys and it was simply a marketing buzz word. It really has no effect on the characteristics of the aluminum alloy to split, crack, dent, corrode, yield, tensile, fatigue cycles, etc. Sorry you got fucked by Ridley. That is lame on their part. Scandium or no Scandium, they should have flipped you a free frame.
     


  2. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I don't think yesterday parts are rare or obsolete by any means, I tour on a 1985 Schwinn Le Tour Luxe with all the original components and not only do they work just fine but I need to change the freewheel gears to give me 34 teeth large gear instead of the factory 28 so I can tackle steep grades while loaded and my LBS stocks it! My LBS stocks the brake pads as well. When I say stock I don't mean they have to send to the warehouse and I wait a week or two, I mean I can walk in and take it home. Really the only thing they can't get is the original hubs, cranks (bottom bracket no problem), derailleurs, brake levers and calipers which I can if needed, everything else is either in stock or in their suppliers warehouse. And in a pinch if something were to happen with any of the components I said they can't get there are modern stuff I can put on and they'll work. A lot people freak out because they changed something a now they fear they won't find parts for their bike so they buy a new bike, it just isn't really necessary.

    And Campy as of 2019 is NOT getting better, they are now following the crowd and will no longer make components with replacement parts to keep them going, they have gone to replace the whole part like Shimano, SRAM and Microshift (with the exception of a very few minor parts like the others do). So in my opinion Campy no longer has any advantage over the other stuff like they once had. I don't think that was good decision on their part but they felt they weren't competitive enough and no one was buying their product, so the change they felt was necessary to keep the costs down so they could be more competitive.

    I do think from what I've read all over the web that the Campy electronic derailleur system is the best one on the market but only in terms of chain and gear life, plus you can manually up shift (not down shift) if the battery was to die on while riding, but those are the only things that make it better, are those advantages worth the extra cost? I don't know, because the Shimano gear and chain life seems to be isolated to incorrectly programed units so it maybe a non issue, which if that is the case it only leaves the ability to get into an easier gear if the battery dies the only advantage.
     
    steve likes this.
  3. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I don't know enough about Scandium to determine what some manufactures did vs others. At the time I got the bike everyone was hailing it as the most important frame material of the decade, suppose to be stronger than any other material, but since my problem with it cracking I've read many reports that Scandium was brittle and fragile, again not sure how all of that translates into production issues all I know is they were problematic.

    Myself and my LBS went around and around with Ridley on that frame. When the frame was first sent in Ridley said it was involved in a crash but my LBS is the one who initially got the bike and went over everything and they were the ones that stripped it to send to Ridley and they told Ridley that all the components were original, nothing was bent, and no signs of any crashes even a tiny crash. Ridley then changed their tune and said it was due to fatigue and fatigue isn't covered by the warranty, again my LBS argued that the bike only had 8,000 miles on it and for that to be considered fatigue was absurd, but Ridley stuck to their final analysis of the crack. I then contacted my attorney and said to forget it because it would cost more to pursue the case from a legal standpoint then the frame was worth. So after about 8 months the case was close on my part and Ridley won...except the LBS that I bought the bike from stopped selling the Ridley line of bikes because of that because they felt it was too much of a risk on their business if they had other failures and Ridley backed off from their warranty and the LBS couldn't afford to replace frames.

    That experience with Ridley made me decide never to buy another Ridley bike which isn't a big deal since I rarely buy from the same manufacture twice anyways, I only did that to Trek, once in 1976 and the other in 1985.
     
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  4. Kakashi

    Kakashi Active Member

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    I really don't have a timeframe in buying a new bike. It just happens, like ifva friend sells me a good bike with a reasonable price, the cheaper the better then I'll buy it, use it to see if I like it and if it's better than my other bikes then I'll retain it and sell one of my older bikes. If not then I'll resell it for a profit.
     
  5. Steve5

    Steve5 Member

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    I haven't changed my bike for a while now. Maybe I will get a new one soon. But I'll likely stick to this one for now. It's not even close to being damaged. :)
     
  6. Steve5

    Steve5 Member

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    That's very practical of you. I find it nice whenever we get good bargains. It's great to have friends who sell you stuff that they don't need but still of good quality. I don't like buying stuff from people I don't know. I'm never sure if there's something wrong with the bike. :D
     
  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Wut?

    https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Support/where_can_i_find_campagnolo_spare_parts

    Sample 2018 spares:

    https://www.campagnolo.com/media/files/035_2366_Catalogue_spare parts_tools_Campagnolo_2018_part_A.pdf

    I can assure you that any Campy part, right down to the tiniest is available to me or anyone with a computer and a telephone. They are often not inexpensive, but have always been available. I haven't seen any change in this policy.
     
    #27 CAMPYBOB, Aug 6, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2018
  8. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Forgot to add...even shimaNO small replacement parts are readily available. shimaNO USA stocks them. I know of no local dealers or resellers that stock small parts for any manufacturer. My local TREK dealer is typical. I could only get TREK matching derailleur hangers by dealing directly with TREK.

    The biggest issue is that only a very, very limited number of owners will ever rebuild something as complicated as a mechanical or electronic shift/brake lever assembly. And at shop labor rates it's less expensive to slap on a replacement unit...in most cases. Some teams do have service course facilities that scavenge parts, use replacement parts and do rebuild components.
     
  9. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Either of these contacts work for me:

    United States

    CAMPAGNOLO NORTH AMERICA INC.

    5431 Avenida Encinas, Suite C
    92008, Carlsbad

    [email protected]
    Tel: +1 760 9310106
    Fax: +1 760 9310991

    United States

    Ochsner Int. Inc.

    246 E. Marquardt Drive
    60090-6430, Wheeling

    Tel: +1-847-4658200
    Fax: +1-847-4658282
     
  10. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    While Campy is making replacement parts they are doing it ahead of time - that is that they make a stock of replacement part when they have an active group. Now that they have changed to 11 speeds they are not making 10 speed replacement parts so you have to get them from distributors that looked far enough ahead to buy replacements. I don't doubt that the other manufacturers will follow suit since it is a marketing strategy.
     
  11. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Campy catalogs back to 1994. They may not have every little piece for a 1980's Victory front derailleur sitting on a shelf, but must of the national level importers can get their hands on it. They have pieces parts for everything I've ever needed. I've never been left wanting.

    Ochsner has parts going back to the 1970's.

    The Yellow Jersey and other sources specialize in NOS items and small parts. I recently purchased a set of genuine Campy sealed in the factory bag track nuts. They cost $15 per nut. Like I said, not exactly inexpensive, but certainly plenty available.

    Eventually, it will dry up. For now almost every little thing is out there if you know where to look.
     
  12. Uawadall

    Uawadall Well-Known Member

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    I may break my 5 year rule soon. I moved last year and am just getting started exploring the surrounding towns. They're some very steep areas, talking 4000-5000 ft for a 50-60 miler. I don't care much about bike weight, but improved braking on long descends would be nice. I'm considering trading in my Synapse to get another alloy bike with disk brakes. It has been a good all around bike, but better and more consistent braking would be great.
     
  13. reighn

    reighn Member

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    I'm using my bike for almost 6 years now, and my last bike before that, I think when I was in college. I'm not really focus on purchasing bike just more on equipment or parts. I just used to buy parts online if saw cheaper one, I will surely buy it, that's why sometimes I avoiding my self to go to online shopping site.
     
  14. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    11 speed Campy derailleurs are a lot cheaper than the same grade of new 10 speed stuff now because they aren't making 10 speed parts anymore and that makes the older parts more valuable. Hell, a NOS 10 speed Record rear derailleur for $400???
     
  15. ajahcuizon

    ajahcuizon New Member

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    Usually, I buy new bike once a year to maintain good quality of bike. But of course, it might cost a lot tgat is why I have this motivation to save more of my money. Sometimes, I sell my old bike to get a new one. I just want to see new bike even just once for a year, I feel so excited to get a ride with. It felt like I have a new friend.
     
  16. Uawadall

    Uawadall Well-Known Member

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    Once a year? Thats fast.

    I don't have anything campy and am not sure how that relates to the quoted message. Tiagra level stuff is dirt cheap to repair.
     
  17. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    I end up getting a DIFFERENT bike pretty often but not usually a new one. I have argued with many, especially campybob, who would argue with his mother than live birth was impossible, that carbon fiber isn't a very good material because over time it hardens and gets brittle.

    However, I talked about the material to engineers from different large scale companies and have turned my opinion around. They have changed the types of resin used to a type that doesn't get brittle and now commonly heat age it so that its characteristics don't change over time. Now the only thing I would be worried about is the design of the material around the areas of greatest stress.

    In any case I have gotten a Made in Taiwan CF bike and will give it a try. I'm attempting to craigslist off about 5 of my bikes at the moment so that I can keep three road bike only and another three of my wife's. This will give me enough room in my garage to be able to keep the bikes I want and actually be able to get to them. My favorite riders at the moment are my totally rebuilt Basso Loto and Pinarello Stelvio. Both of these bikes have special tubing. The Loto is slightly oversized and handles like a dream while being slightly lighter than the older Gap. While it is lighter it is noticeably stiffer. However, in my 62 mm size, it isn't quite stiff enough on hard downhills until you get used to the slight movement of the tubing flex. The tubing on the Pinarello Stevio is stiffer and there isn't any noticeable flex. Both bikes have stiff wheels on them with 23 mm on the Basso and 28 on the Pinarello. I can't tell any difference in the rolling resistance since the 23 is a Gatorskin and the 28 is a Michellin Pro4 Endurance set-up as a tubeless.

    The new bike is a 2014 Colnago that has never been ridden so I'll be starting with what is essentially a new bike. I'm trying to sry
     
  18. mazenn

    mazenn New Member

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    I look at bikes from time to time, but am starting to realize how long a bike can really last if its taken care of. I think having 2 is good incase one needs to be repaired or something of that nature.
     
  19. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    OK, I discovered this unused Colnago CLX on Ebay and snapped it up. It rides so good that it could be my only bike. Yesterday I was doing a 32 mph descent with a series of sharp turns. On the steel bikes I have to be very careful with my line but on the Colnago it was like riding on straight road. Pretty amazing. The fast guys were all riding high end CF bikes and I left them so far behind that I did the 2 miles down and another flat mile to the last climb and got 3/4ths of the way up it before the young guy caught me. But I don't know how much of this is my descending skill compared to theirs.
     
  20. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    The weight differences are pretty small. All set up with water bottle and flat kit my lightest is 20 lbs and the heaviest is 26 lbs. I'm 185 and can't seem to work any of that 5 lbs of lard off.

    20 + 185 = 205 26 + 185 = 211 211/205 = 1.03 For Joe Average Rider how can he tell the difference of 3%? I'm climbing a lot of hills and I seem the same speed on any of them. Now part of this could be that I have to climb in more or less the same gear but then I'm not going to get a 12 speed in order to get some intermediate gear that might give me 1/4 mph more. I'm not a racer and except in climbing I'm as fast as the rest of the group.
     
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