How old were you when you got your first really nice bike?



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K

Kevan Smith

Guest
On 13 Sep 2003 14:24:31 GMT, [email protected] from University of
Helsinki wrote:

>At 29 I got my first recumbent. Dura-Ace bar end shifters and Ultegra rear cassette. Not such a
>rush as the first bike, but I ride it more and it's very nice and there will be interesting
>experiences for a good time to come.

http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/Kuvat/bikes/viper/viperP8240012b.jpg

Does your chain always drag the ground like that?

--
http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace If I had heart failure right now, I couldn't
be a more fortunate man!!
2:54:33 PM 13 September 2003
 
D

Dick Schoeller

Guest
I was 14 or 15. I don't remember the exact purchase date. Just that it was 1973. This was during the
"bike boom". I was doing 20-50 miles rides on a Columbia 10 speed that I had seriously outgrown and
I was looking to start doing centuries. I dumped a bunch of birthday money and some savings (total
about $200) into
it.

The bike is a Criterium Rex by Araya. 25" lugged frame in touring dimensions, Suntour VGT
derailleurs, Sugino cranks and BB, SR stem, Taihei post and seat, Dia Compe brakes. It's had a bunch
of upgrades along the way (derailleurs and wheels) and it is still going strong (put about 500 miles
on it this summer).

I've got to say, some of things that others describe as "really nice" were what I was trying to get
away from when I bought this bike. But guess, tastes vary.

On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 19:14:12 -0700, Brink wrote:

> How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?
>

--
**** Schoeller mailto:[email protected] http://schoeller.ne.client2.attbi.com/
781.449.5476

"Er ist ein Narr, der meint, es sei nicht schad, das Kind auszuschütten mit dem Bad" - Thomas
Murner 1512
 
M

M. Barbee

Guest
"Brink" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?

My first bike was pretty nice. I was 7 and it was 1984. My dad was working for True Temper Sports
and they were doing work with Skyway bikes. (I don't hear about that name brand bike anymore, but I
remember one of my friends in third grade who was into BMX racing was pretty impressed when I told
him the brand name.) So my dad got his hands on a Skyway frame and slowly bought parts and built up
the chrome frame to a single speed bike with coaster brakes. I never had training wheels on it and
just struggled around with it in the back yard until I learned how to ride. I abused that bike to no
end and all I ever had to help my dad do was re-lube the chain and rebuild the bottom bracket. I
never wanted to get rid of it but as I got into my teens I rode it less (yes I could still ride it
then) and one day I wasn't home and my mother sold it while she was having a yard sale.

I've only had three bikes as an adult, and I bought the first one two years ago when I was 25. It
was a Raleigh C-40. Not the nicest bike but I bought it at the LBS and it held its own considering
the price. Unfortuantely, it was stolen.
 
R

Risto Varanka

Guest
Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

: http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/Kuvat/bikes/viper/viperP8240012b.jpg

: Does your chain always drag the ground like that?

Oh, that's a common question :) The chain is pretty low on this trike because of a 20" rear wheel
and MTB style rear derailleur with the long arm.

Depends. On the picture it's a bit soft sand so it's pretty bad
:) On clean pavement it doesn't really matter as one has the 3 cm
of room at about all times. It also depends on the gearing and length of chain as the derailleur arm
swings back and forth...

--
Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
12 Sep 2003 19:14:12 -0700,
<[email protected]>, [email protected] (Brink) wrote:

>How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?

I've never really had a lousy bike.

The 24" balloon tire J.C. Higgens, I received for my 7th birthday, was the greatest bike in the
world. . . Until I'd saved up enough to buy Robin Hood 3spd when I was around 11½ years old. It was
stolen. I bought a new 10spd when I was 21. After the second one was stolen, I built my first full
Campy bike, a Mercian, just before I'd turned 22.
--
zk
 
A

Antti Salonen

Guest
[email protected] wrote:

> Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

> : http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/Kuvat/bikes/viper/viperP8240012b.jpg

> : Does your chain always drag the ground like that?

> Oh, that's a common question :) The chain is pretty low on this trike because of a 20" rear wheel
> and MTB style rear derailleur with the long arm.

As I think you've mentioned you have an Ultegra cassette, why don't you use a short-cage "road"
derailer? It might even improve shifting performance a tiny bit. In any case, a lubricated chain
dragging the ground like that is probably going to pick up quite a bit of dirt, which isn't good for
the chain.

-as
 
M

Marian Rosenber

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Kevan Smith <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:
>
> : http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/Kuvat/bikes/viper/viperP8240012b.jpg
>
> : Does your chain always drag the ground like that?
>
> Oh, that's a common question :) The chain is pretty low on this trike because of a 20" rear wheel
> and MTB style rear derailleur with the long arm.
>
> Depends. On the picture it's a bit soft sand so it's pretty bad
> :) On clean pavement it doesn't really matter as one has the 3 cm
> of room at about all times. It also depends on the gearing and length of chain as the derailleur
> arm swings back and forth...

I have the bad feeling tht I smell a Project and you are going to give me instructions on making one
... and that I might even feel motivated and do such a thing.

How do you get one of those!?

-M
 
M

Marian Rosenber

Guest
Brink wrote:
> How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?

I didn't get my first bike until I was 13.

Our yard is a hill. There are various gradations of hill. Some of it is uphill and other bits are
downhill but it is all hill. Except for the bridge, which is usually littered with broken glass,
there aren't any nearby sidewalks.

So with no place for me to learn how to ride a bike and no place for a younger person to ride
without getting in the car first I didn't get a bike.

My aunt bought it for me for my bat mitzvah. She had taught me to ride the summer before on a bike
path behind her house.

I don't remember much about this bike. It was bright hot pink. It was, if I recall correctly "a
beach bike" and had big tires. I liked that bike. A lot.

On my first big bicycle ride I was very annoyed when they said I couldn't use my single speed bike
and had to use a multispeed bike. One of the counselors at the summer camp worked for a LBS and was
a geek so I ended up riding an old oooollld bike. I don't remember the type of bike. But, being a
geek myself, I remember the ivory colored plastic that was an early type of plastic, and the
information imparted to me about the way in which the welds were done. It had 3 speeds. I moved
gears when someone told me to move gears.

In later years at the same camp I would bring along my older brother's road bike and end up swapping
with a counselor who could actually ride it and having their bike adjusted to me. And then, my last
year at that camp I had my own new geared bike.

Which was a nice bike though may have been an Xmart special. It also may have been bike shop. Recent
past though it was I really do not remember! It wasn't important to me at the time, it was just a
bike that was going to replace the single speed I really liked because the people at the summer camp
insisted I have a multi speed bike. (I never shifted except when someone reminded me to do so and
usually walked up most of the hills but they insisted if I wanted to go on the two week bike and
hike trip I had to have a proper bike.)

And which was stolen from _inside_ our house at the end of summer. The theif realized someone was
home before they got anything valuable and was heading out when they saw the bike sitting in the
entryway. Rrrrr.

In college I rode my hot pink single speed and loved it. It almost never got locked. In my third
year of college the people mowing the lawn at my rented house moved the bike away from its hiding
place next to the house into a nice prominent place on the porch ... from which it disappeared never
to be seen again.

I probably would have gotten a new bike but I broke my leg at the beginning of that summer.

I purchased my first "bought it with my own money" bike at 21 from the bike shop closest to work. It
was 220 rmb bargained down from 420 because I wanted the cheapest bike in the shop and they refused
to sell it to me. "Not good enough for a foreigner."

It was stolen over the summer when I loaned it to a friend.

My first nice bike came a few weeks ago.

Not a fantastic bike but a nice bike.

For 490 rmb (about 50 or 55 bucks) I got a Giant Athena. It has wide tires but definitely isn't a
mountain bike. I'd guess it is an all terrain type bike. Local streets can certainly be all terrain
at times.. Single Speed. Shimano thingy-whatses on the wheels ... I think hubs is the correct term.
Those are the only parts on it that have names printed on them.

You can see a picture of it and some uselessly written in Chinese specifications at:

http://www.giant-bicycles.com/ch/030.000.000/030.000.000.asp?dealerid=&dealercountry=&lYear=2003&bi-
kesection=8786&range=87&model=6661

or

http://tinyurl.com/nawg

Still not a fantastic bike. It is way better than my last bike, or any bike I have ever owned except
for the hot pink bike that was my first. Having a good bike I want to have a better bike.

For now, I guess the answer is either 22 or 13 years old. 22 years old because it is my best bike to
date. 13 because that is the age of wonder and everything is wonderful when you are that age.

-M
 
A

Appkiller

Guest
My first bike was a red Schwinn singlespeed. Rode that bike until my two older brothers got new
Schwinn ?'s (not Varsity, they had those, it was a step up from that) and my younger brother and I
got their Varsity's. The Varsity was where I learned bike maintenance, tearing down everything and
putting it back together. Those bikes were great for a kid!

We used to have "Glide Races" down our road. Only one push with a foot allowed and then a 3/4 mile
run down various slopes. I was a bit rotund, so the runout at the end always made me the winner (one
of the few bonuses of being a fat kid).

We rode those bikes everywhere, sometimes even a 20 mile round trip to the neighboring larger town
where they had a Mexican restaurant (mmmmmm!!!!).

Then a Sekine 10 speed bike my college girlfriend (now wife) rescued. Loved it but left it unlocked
in her neighborhood one evening (ah, the distractions of young love) and ****! gone.

My next bike was a Panasonic mountain bike. Frame came from a friend in college and I built it up
myself (it had a crank, bb and headset already installed). I forget what happened to it.

Later bought one of the original Cannondale mtn bikes from a roommate
- steel fork and a little too small - but so cool on campus! That bike was stolen (u-locked to
a wrought-iron railing and someone came along and clipped the railing - so much for
kryptonite locks).

One day, after receiving my tax refund while in college, I decided I needed a road bike. I had been
doing 10 - 20 mile rides in the area and decided to start riding. Traded my refund check ($500!) for
a Fuji Club - 14 indexed speeds, Ishiwata triple butted and channeled tubing, RX100 components,
yowza, that bike rocked! After graduating college, I started doing club rides in the area - touring
rides in southern Wisconsin with a co-worker. My first 30+ mile rides and real hills (anyone know
Mound Park road?). This was the bike that pushed me to learn to build wheels.

After the Cannondale was stolen, I replaced it with another - an SH600 hybrid. LX components, very
nice. Good for campus riding where the Fuji didn't like the dust from the bike trails along the
lake, jumping curbs and potholes on the roads.

A series of life changes put me off riding for a few years and I was down to the hybrid which
served me well (sold the Fuji to a friend). Started riding again and bought a Klein Stage Comp T.
Did GRAABAWR on it and some other fairly serious riding until I realized it was just too big in
the top tube.

Which brings me full circle to my two latest bikes. Both Schwinns, both frames I picked up off ebay.
One a Paramount Ti (Serotta was building these) and the other a Super Sport SL (Reynolds 853). Both
Campy 10 (Paramount = Chorus and Super Sport = Daytona). Both of these are amazing bikes in their
own right.

Which bike was the first really nice one? How can I pick? They all served me faithfully. The first
really nice one, though, has to be that very first single speed Schwinn. I loved that bike, got my
first serious road rash on that bike, and best of all, it was on that bike that I got my first taste
of freedom.

App
 
P

Preston Crawfor

Guest
On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 19:14:12 -0700, Brink wrote:

> How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?

Well, that really depends, doesn't it? :)

I've never owned a bike that cost more than $700 and yet I consider most ever bike I've owned an
awesome bike and a treasure. My two favorites being my first road bike (a used Univega my dad bought
me at age 13) and my present road bike, a Trek 1000. I've made losts of memories on both and battled
lots of problems on both. They're both priceless.

Preston
 
J

Joan Masters

Guest
[email protected] (Brink) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?
>

At the time, each bike seemed like the really nice bike. After riding the big blue bike with balloon
tires that my sisters and cousins before them had all used, the gold Roadmaster banana seat stingray
seemed to be really nice (c. 1970). Then the Schwinn Varsity 10 speed that I saved my money for
(used from the want ads) seemed to be the really nice bike when I was 14.

The Miyata 710 purchased in 1982 was and still is a really nice bike (for city use). But my
really really nice bike is my Nobilette custom frame, Suntour supbrepro components, bike from
1986 when I was 26.
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
Sat, 13 Sep 2003 12:07:17 +0200, <[email protected]>, "sparker"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>I love my new bike.

Lock it. Always. Forever.

And with two locks, but especially in France.

The volume and stench of Parisian traffic is overwhelming in contrast to Vancouver but it seems
to move in a more civilised manner in that they're more accepting of, and accustomed to, other
road users.

French drivers too are eminently more skilled than the visible majority of Vancouver's renown
lousiest drivers.

I'd watch where I dabbed though.
--
zk
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
Sun, 14 Sep 2003 13:46:11 GMT, <[email protected]>, "Preston
Crawford" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I've never owned a bike that cost more than $700 and yet I consider most ever bike I've owned an
>awesome bike and a treasure.

hehehe, contrast that to Mark Jones', "I hated that car.", when speaking of his fart-box Ford. I
hated my Jetta and on many occasions have cursed various motorcycles and cars to an eternal karmic
destiny of being recycled as pop cans.

I don't recall bicycles having ever let me down.
--
zk
 
R

Risto Varanka

Guest
Marian Rosenberg <[email protected]> wrote:

: I have the bad feeling tht I smell a Project and you are going to give me instructions on making
: one ... and that I might even feel motivated and do such a thing.

: How do you get one of those!?

Read the provided links? (Like the one below... ;)

--
Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
 
R

Risto Varanka

Guest
Antti Salonen <[email protected]> wrote:

: As I think you've mentioned you have an Ultegra cassette, why don't you use a short-cage "road"
: derailer? It might even improve shifting performance a tiny bit. In any case, a lubricated chain
: dragging the ground like that is probably going to pick up quite a bit of dirt, which isn't good
: for the chain.

Yuup... there's also 26" rear wheel available for the trike, which could give up to 3" of extra
clearance. The derailleur would cost some extra too... It's usually not a problem since I ride on
level pavement... But for winter commuting... I've also been thinking of a touring cassette with
11-28 or something like that, but I guess road derailleurs might handle that just fine as well,
especially with double crankset. (Gave some thought to different cranksets too :)

--
Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
 
B

Bruce Abrams

Guest
First "nice" bike was a Centurian when I was about 15. Next was a Centurian Ironman Master after I
got married, probably in 1989. Then came a Bridgestone Radac in the late '90s as a hand-me-down from
my dad. My first "really nice" bike was a Bianchi Daytona 2 years ago when the Radac was stolen.

"Brink" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?
>
> I got a cheap mountain bike from the local bike shop at age 21.( Mongoose hiltopper)
>
> I got a really nice road bike this year at age 29. (Tommasini techno ultegra components)
>
> Why did i wait so long?
>
> Well at least i saw the light!
>
> ----Brink
 
M

Mike Latondress

Guest
Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

> Sat, 13 Sep 2003 12:07:17 +0200, <[email protected]>, "sparker"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>
>>I love my new bike.
>
> Lock it. Always. Forever.
>
> And with two locks, but especially in France.
>
Only if it is a road bike Zoot, if it is a mountain bike you can leave it unlocked anywhere and no
one would even look at it let alone steal it...the French are wise in some ways.
 
S

Sparker

Guest
"Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Sat, 13 Sep 2003 12:07:17 +0200, <[email protected]>, "sparker"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >
> >I love my new bike.
>
> Lock it. Always. Forever.
>
> And with two locks, but especially in France.

I do. And I never leave it outside overnight. I have seen so many bikes picked clean after being
left out. The bad side of this is I have to carry my bike up five flights of stairs each day. I look
at it as conditioning.

>
> The volume and stench of Parisian traffic is overwhelming in contrast to Vancouver but it seems
> to move in a more civilised manner in that they're more accepting of, and accustomed to, other
> road users.
>
> French drivers too are eminently more skilled than the visible majority of Vancouver's renown
> lousiest drivers.
>
> I'd watch where I dabbed though.
> --
> zk

You are absolutley right, and I don't mean to say that riding in Paris is better than Vancouver.
They're different. And I will probably move back to Vancouver soon, so I will have to get used to
it's traffic (and rain) once again.

Alex
 
M

Mark Freedman

Guest
[email protected] (Brink) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?
>

Ah. Nostalgia.

I vaguely recall my Raleigh "Mounty." I think it was blue. White chainguard.

I remember learning to balance my first bicycle (we skipped the training wheels).

The launch-sequence stabilization device (aka my father) would accelerate alongside until I
reached exit velocity, then the locking clamps (aka his hands) would drop away and I'd be on my
way to the space sta ... er, ahem, end of the laneway, trying to remember how to stop without
falling over.

I rode (relatively) long distances for a munchkin, exploring Sherbrooke Street in Montreal. I
think traffic was kinder and gentler back then. Or my guardian angel shooed away the asteroids
and space debris (trucks, cars, motorcycles).

Perhaps you need to be more specific when you say "really nice bike"
 
W

W.S. O'Neal

Guest
I was in fifth grade and it was a red stingray , That I bought for one dollar at a police auction.
"mark freedman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> [email protected] (Brink) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > How old were you when you got your first really nice bike and what was it?
> >
>
> Ah. Nostalgia.
>
> I vaguely recall my Raleigh "Mounty." I think it was blue. White chainguard.
>
> I remember learning to balance my first bicycle (we skipped the training wheels).
>
> The launch-sequence stabilization device (aka my father) would accelerate alongside until I
> reached exit velocity, then the locking clamps (aka his hands) would drop away and I'd be on my
> way to the space sta ... er, ahem, end of the laneway, trying to remember how to stop without
> falling over.
>
> I rode (relatively) long distances for a munchkin, exploring Sherbrooke Street in Montreal. I
> think traffic was kinder and gentler back then. Or my guardian angel shooed away the asteroids
> and space debris (trucks, cars, motorcycles).
>
> Perhaps you need to be more specific when you say "really nice bike"
 
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