how should shoes fit

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by david462, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. david462

    david462 New Member

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    my first pair were a $75 pair. i tried them on before buying and thought they were right, but found out after riding they were way too big. i had to put a folded up sock behind my heal so that the arch in the sole was at the right spot.

    so....

    i bought some sidi genius 5's online cause i got 15% off. they seem to fit better but i still have some room. i can slide my foot forward a little bit (so my heal is not against the back of the shoe).

    i have not test road them yet for various reasons, but how should the shoes fit? i figured you should go a half size bigger than what feels right when you try them on cause your feet swell when riding...
     
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  2. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    You're gonna want those shoes snug.
     
  3. Scotty_Dog

    Scotty_Dog New Member

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    You have figured wrong, because cycling shoes are supposed to fit snugly. The snug fit prevents them from slipping around during the demands of pedaling.
     
  4. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    You definitely want the heel to fit snugly into the heel cone. It prevents your heel from lifting out.
     
  5. david462

    david462 New Member

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    im returning them for a size smaller. they pay return shipping (to me) anyways and im still saving money than buying them in a shop (dont like my lbs).
     
  6. dstfort

    dstfort New Member

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    so the same shoe i wear every day would be the same size my roab biking shoes would be?
     
  7. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    You're also going to have variation by manufacturer. I run a 43 in Pearl Izumis, yet 44 in my Shimanos and DMTs. The general guide is if it feels comfy, it's too loose, if it is a little snug it's just right and if it's real tight it's too tight. Plus, you'll be wearing far thinner socks than you'd normally wear in dress/casual shoes.
     
  8. pistole

    pistole New Member

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    - must be very snug.

    - made the same mistake with my 1st set of cycling shoes , thinking that I would use the same 'margin' with normal walking shoes.

    - VERY snug. And thin socks.
    .
     
  9. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    +1 My shoes fit so snugly that I definitely thought they were too small when I got them. (specialized comp MTB, used for road). But, the arch is in the right place, and now after using them for about 2000 miles (currently about 100 mi / week; longest ride 65 miles), I have never had a single foot related problem. They are tough to put on and I use a shoe horn, but once on, they are comfortable with a very thin sock, and I also frequenly ride w/o socks in the summer without any problems.

    FWIW.
     
  10. Oruboris

    Oruboris New Member

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    Weeeellllll.... snug, yes. Painful, no.

    How hard you ride is part of the equation, here.

    It's like with ski boots: if you really go hard, constantly challange yourself, and are looking to shave off seconds from every trip, tight is better.

    But if you are more casual, a more casual fit is OK, too.

    I know people who have actually given up skiing because the boot fitters assume every skis like boot fitters do: loosing a toenail or two every season is practically a badge of honor.

    If you go too snug and find yourself actually in pain after half an hour in the saddle, it will be a real de-motivator.

    But slippage is your enemy. All your foot motion should translate to pedal motion. At the bottom of the downstroke, you should feel your foot going from pushing down to pulling up with no movement of the foot realitive to the shoe.

    My sidi megas are snug but never painful, and because the toebox is cut wide, actually wear more comfortably than many of my 'street' shoes.

    Remember most shoes will losen a little as they break in. When new, if they feel OK without a sock, too tight with one, they are probably just right.

    New or old, if you have to really cinch them down to get a snug fit, get a smaller size.
     
  11. J5311

    J5311 New Member

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    thank god i found this thread... i too am looking for a cycling shoe, & figured that i would buy the mtb shoes cuz they are easiest to walk in and many people recomend them, but also how they fit... i guess buying bike shoes is like having hockey skates... normal shoes are about a size 12 1/2 - 13, but in skates i am arount a 10.5 & they too wear thin socks/ or none at all.

    now that i have figured that before i buy i shoe i should go to my lbs & try on some so i can get a felling/ idea in what size i should get

    what brands are good? are there any brands thta i should stay away from?
     
  12. Oruboris

    Oruboris New Member

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    You get what you pay for, BUT I wouldn't spend big bucks on your first pair. After a thousand miles, you'll have a much clearer idea of what you really need in terms of fit and features. Still, if you really like to bike, you might want to avoid the cheapest entry level models as well, since they are usually too flexible and the closures often fail.

    The fit is so crucial, I'd say at least try a few on at the local before you consider an internet buy. At the very least, you'll get a sense of how different brands work with your feet. Sidi generally runs smaller than most, and if you have a wide forefoot a good shoe can be hard to find. Sidi Megas are great, but when they say its wide fit, they mean w i d e f i t .

    But trying them on in the store is only a little useful: since the sole should be very rigid, they won't feel like a normal shoe. Plus, you can't really apply upward pressure until you are clipped into the bike. Be very wary if your toes feel pinched or squished, but there should be no heal slip, plenty of adjustment over the instep so you can cinch them tighter as you and them get to know one another. You won't be sure if they are the right ones for you for at least a couple hundred miles, which is why there are so many for sale on ebay.

    Mesh is great if you are in a hot climate or season-- wish I'd been wearing them today. Also tend to be more comfy, but can be sloppy. Comfort/performance trade off. The sock matters a lot in temperature extremes.

    One of my essentials is a ratchet closure. Velcro doesn't last well for me, doesn't hold well when wet, and attracts burs and seeds if I go off road. But I don't race, so the extra weight isn't an issue.
     
  13. Rockslayer

    Rockslayer New Member

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    In regards to fit rather than single out any one brand good or bad you may need to try different brands as everyone foot is different. The fit of a shoe may also be different depending on the maker. Variations can also be things like width and arch support. Some brands also make variable widths. Like everyone said make sure its snug/correctly fitted. Also choose the shoes depending on the level/type of riding you are doing.
     
  14. dekindy

    dekindy New Member

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    You maybe should have kept them. My Shimano shoes fit great. But they are so snug that I cannot put an aftermarket insole in them or a Toasty Feet insole for Winter makes them tight as well. But if the stock insole is okay and you will not want to ride them in Winter weather, you did the right thing by sending them back for a smaller size that will fit snug.
     
  15. Crankyfeet

    Crankyfeet New Member

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    Ditto on the Specialized shoes. The "body geometry" fit has helped my knees and the insole is snug. Sidi shoes felt like my foot was pushing on a flat board insole in comparison. But this was just personal experience.
     
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