How should your butt fit on the seat?



Fizzy23

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Mar 20, 2005
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I know this is a wierd question but how should the seat fit your butt? Should the lower pelvic bone be on the back part of the seat or in front of this?

Humor me on this one........

Thanks
 

jjiam25

New Member
Jun 29, 2005
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Fizzy23 said:
I know this is a wierd question but how should the seat fit your butt? Should the lower pelvic bone be on the back part of the seat or in front of this?

Humor me on this one........

Thanks
It is very uncomfortable at first, but I had to experiment so much, and finally found out that your sit bones should be on the pads that are made for them. Humans are generally used to sitting on the back of our legs, but when you cycle you must sit on your sit bones, or you will destroy your penis when you sit on your perinium. That said when you ride on your sit bones, your family jewels are above the seat. I had to goto the LBS and got fitted and boy it made a difference, not comfortable at first, but you get used to it the more you cycle. Hope this helps
 

delillo

New Member
Jul 8, 2005
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I have a similar question; I just started commuting on a touring bike, and have only been 220 miles on a new bike with a new saddle. I don't have any saddle sores, but it feels like the flesh around my sit bones is totally bruised--I'm worried I'll have to cut my weekend rides short at this rate. How long do other riders tough it out before looking at new saddles? Do you keep going for 500 miles to see if you can get used to it?
 

astroluc

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Jun 20, 2005
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jjiam25 said:
It is very uncomfortable at first, but I had to experiment so much, and finally found out that your sit bones should be on the pads that are made for them. Humans are generally used to sitting on the back of our legs, but when you cycle you must sit on your sit bones, or you will destroy your penis when you sit on your perinium. That said when you ride on your sit bones, your family jewels are above the seat. I had to goto the LBS and got fitted and boy it made a difference, not comfortable at first, but you get used to it the more you cycle. Hope this helps
ah ha ! thank you... and thank you Fizzy23 for posting this question which I have also been wondering about
 

TheCycologist

New Member
Jun 20, 2005
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delillo said:
I have a similar question; I just started commuting on a touring bike, and have only been 220 miles on a new bike with a new saddle. I don't have any saddle sores, but it feels like the flesh around my sit bones is totally bruised--I'm worried I'll have to cut my weekend rides short at this rate. How long do other riders tough it out before looking at new saddles? Do you keep going for 500 miles to see if you can get used to it?
In all likelihood you'll simply get used to it after a while. The first month of cycling I was bruised around that area and it absolutely killed, got to the point that I couldn't put weight on it when I was cycling so I had to lay off for a few days. You should simply get used to it after a bit and then you'll be in good shape.

~BG
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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TheCycologist said:
In all likelihood you'll simply get used to it after a while. The first month of cycling I was bruised around that area and it absolutely killed, got to the point that I couldn't put weight on it when I was cycling so I had to lay off for a few days. You should simply get used to it after a bit and then you'll be in good shape.

~BG
Yes, good point. If the saddle is wide enough to support your sitz bones, firm enough so you're not sinking in and going numb, and positioned correctly so you're not sliding off the front or back, the rest is just getting used to it. Plenty of chamois lube to prevent chaffing of course completes my short checklist.

During your ride, obviously the more you time you spend out of the saddle the better. Short, frequent standing breaks seem to help me a lot. Climbing, coasting downhill, or just standing on the flats and alternating pedal strokes all can be used to get 30 seconds of relief, and stretch the back a bit also. Doing this early and consistently throughout a long ride, eg, every 15 minutes, might prevent or delay the onset of pain.