how to bard?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Feb 17, 2005.

  1. i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it. i'm
    not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use american
    bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for barding?

    is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?

    Josh
     
    Tags:


  2. aem

    aem Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it.

    i'm
    > not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use american
    > bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for barding?
    >
    > is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?


    Bacon is usually blanched for a few minutes before being used for
    barding, especially if it is smoked bacon. Another thing that is
    sometimes possible is to slice fat from the meat you're going to cook
    and then spread it/tie it onto the top.

    -aem
     
  3. aem

    aem Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it.

    {snip]

    It's quite rare to bard a chicken. The technique is usually for a
    denser kind of meat. If your roast chicken is too dry, you may just be
    overcooking it. Or, if it's a true roaster over, say, five pounds, you
    might cook it breast side down for half the time and then turn it over
    to finish.

    -aem
     
  4. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it.

    > i'm
    >> not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use american
    >> bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for barding?
    >>
    >> is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?

    >
    > Bacon is usually blanched for a few minutes before being used for
    > barding, especially if it is smoked bacon. Another thing that is
    > sometimes possible is to slice fat from the meat you're going to cook
    > and then spread it/tie it onto the top.
    >
    > -aem
    >


    Isn't is "lard" -threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Or is bard
    another technique?


    --
    Peter Aitken (trying to resist making a Shakespeare joke)

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  5. On Tue 22 Feb 2005 02:53:01p, Peter Aitken wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>> i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it. i'm
    >>> not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use american
    >>> bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for barding?
    >>>
    >>> is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?

    >>
    >> Bacon is usually blanched for a few minutes before being used for
    >> barding, especially if it is smoked bacon. Another thing that is
    >> sometimes possible is to slice fat from the meat you're going to cook
    >> and then spread it/tie it onto the top.
    >>
    >> -aem
    >>

    >
    > Isn't is "lard" -threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Or is bard
    > another technique?


    Larding is threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Barding is laying
    thin layers of fat on the outside surface of the meat.

    Wayne
     
  6. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue 22 Feb 2005 02:53:01p, Peter Aitken wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>> i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it. i'm
    >>>> not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use american
    >>>> bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for barding?
    >>>>
    >>>> is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?
    >>>
    >>> Bacon is usually blanched for a few minutes before being used for
    >>> barding, especially if it is smoked bacon. Another thing that is
    >>> sometimes possible is to slice fat from the meat you're going to cook
    >>> and then spread it/tie it onto the top.
    >>>
    >>> -aem
    >>>

    >>
    >> Isn't is "lard" -threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Or is bard
    >> another technique?

    >
    > Larding is threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Barding is laying
    > thin layers of fat on the outside surface of the meat.
    >
    > Wayne
    >


    Thanks - never heard of that before.


    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  7. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On Tue 22 Feb 2005 02:53:01p, Peter Aitken wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>
    >>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>> i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it. i'm
    >>>>> not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use american
    >>>>> bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for barding?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?
    >>>>
    >>>> Bacon is usually blanched for a few minutes before being used for
    >>>> barding, especially if it is smoked bacon. Another thing that is
    >>>> sometimes possible is to slice fat from the meat you're going to cook
    >>>> and then spread it/tie it onto the top.
    >>>>
    >>>> -aem
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Isn't is "lard" -threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Or is bard
    >>> another technique?

    >>
    >> Larding is threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Barding is laying
    >> thin layers of fat on the outside surface of the meat.
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >>

    >
    > Thanks - never heard of that before.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Peter Aitken


    Ok, now I have to ask. What is the reasoning behind both larding and
    barding? Adding more flavor?

    Me stupid. Need know.

    Bret



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  8. On Tue 22 Feb 2005 07:09:28p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> On Tue 22 Feb 2005 02:53:01p, Peter Aitken wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>
    >>>> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>>
    >>>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>>> i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it.
    >>>>>> i'm not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use
    >>>>>> american bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for
    >>>>>> barding?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Bacon is usually blanched for a few minutes before being used for
    >>>>> barding, especially if it is smoked bacon. Another thing that is
    >>>>> sometimes possible is to slice fat from the meat you're going to
    >>>>> cook and then spread it/tie it onto the top.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> -aem
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Isn't is "lard" -threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Or is
    >>>> bard another technique?
    >>>
    >>> Larding is threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Barding is
    >>> laying thin layers of fat on the outside surface of the meat.
    >>>
    >>> Wayne
    >>>

    >>
    >> Thanks - never heard of that before.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Peter Aitken

    >
    > Ok, now I have to ask. What is the reasoning behind both larding and
    > barding? Adding more flavor?
    >
    > Me stupid. Need know.
    >
    > Bret


    It does add flavor, but the main reason is to add fat/moisture and
    tenderness to an otherwise dryer/less tender (usually) cut of meat. It's
    often used with game because the meat is so lean that it tends to dry out
    in the oven.

    Wayne
     
  9. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue 22 Feb 2005 07:09:28p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>> On Tue 22 Feb 2005 02:53:01p, Peter Aitken wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>>>> i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it.
    >>>>>>> i'm not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use
    >>>>>>> american bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for
    >>>>>>> barding?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Bacon is usually blanched for a few minutes before being used for
    >>>>>> barding, especially if it is smoked bacon. Another thing that is
    >>>>>> sometimes possible is to slice fat from the meat you're going to
    >>>>>> cook and then spread it/tie it onto the top.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> -aem
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Isn't is "lard" -threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Or is
    >>>>> bard another technique?
    >>>>
    >>>> Larding is threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Barding is
    >>>> laying thin layers of fat on the outside surface of the meat.
    >>>>
    >>>> Wayne
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks - never heard of that before.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Peter Aitken

    >>
    >> Ok, now I have to ask. What is the reasoning behind both larding and
    >> barding? Adding more flavor?
    >>
    >> Me stupid. Need know.
    >>
    >> Bret

    >
    > It does add flavor, but the main reason is to add fat/moisture and
    > tenderness to an otherwise dryer/less tender (usually) cut of meat. It's
    > often used with game because the meat is so lean that it tends to dry out
    > in the oven.
    >
    > Wayne


    Thanks for clearing that up for me, Wayne.

    I keep reading of different "cooking-actions" on here and some I know and
    some I don't. It's pleasant to back a nice reply and not a flame for it
    too! That's a bonus!

    Bret



    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
     
  10. On Tue 22 Feb 2005 08:36:15p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On Tue 22 Feb 2005 07:09:28p, Maverick wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>> "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>> "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>> On Tue 22 Feb 2005 02:53:01p, Peter Aitken wrote in
    >>>>> rec.food.cooking:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>>>>> i'd like to experiment with barding a chicken before roasting it.
    >>>>>>>> i'm not likely to find caul fat or fat back. i suppose i'll use
    >>>>>>>> american bacon. is bacon usually blanched before being used for
    >>>>>>>> barding?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> is there another fat i should know about for barding purposes?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Bacon is usually blanched for a few minutes before being used for
    >>>>>>> barding, especially if it is smoked bacon. Another thing that is
    >>>>>>> sometimes possible is to slice fat from the meat you're going to
    >>>>>>> cook and then spread it/tie it onto the top.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> -aem
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Isn't is "lard" -threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Or is
    >>>>>> bard another technique?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Larding is threading thin strips of fat thru the meat. Barding is
    >>>>> laying thin layers of fat on the outside surface of the meat.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Wayne
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks - never heard of that before.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Peter Aitken
    >>>
    >>> Ok, now I have to ask. What is the reasoning behind both larding and
    >>> barding? Adding more flavor?
    >>>
    >>> Me stupid. Need know.
    >>>
    >>> Bret

    >>
    >> It does add flavor, but the main reason is to add fat/moisture and
    >> tenderness to an otherwise dryer/less tender (usually) cut of meat.
    >> It's often used with game because the meat is so lean that it tends to
    >> dry out in the oven.
    >>
    >> Wayne

    >
    > Thanks for clearing that up for me, Wayne.
    >
    > I keep reading of different "cooking-actions" on here and some I know
    > and some I don't. It's pleasant to back a nice reply and not a flame
    > for it too! That's a bonus!
    >
    > Bret


    You're entirely welcome, Bret, and thank you. BTW, the term used for the
    thin strips of bacon or fat is "lardoon". The fat used for barding may or
    may not have come from the same animal. It's usually tied in place with
    cooking twine.

    Cheers,
    Wayne
     
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