How to Cook Large Scallops?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Nov 30, 2005.

  1. I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
    with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
    because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
    scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
    up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
    them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
    are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
     
    Tags:


  2. [email protected] wrote:
    > I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
    > with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
    > because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
    > scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
    > up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
    > them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
    > are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
    >


    "opaque" means "not translucent anymore".

    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  3. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    sarah bennett wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
    >> with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
    >> because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
    >> scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
    >> up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
    >> them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
    >> are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
    >>

    >
    > "opaque" means "not translucent anymore".


    To further clarify... when you get the scallops (and large are good!), they
    are pinkish. When you cook them they turn white which means they are
    opaque. I'd say pan-fry in butter (I'd use a blend of 1 Tbs. butter to 1
    Tbs. olive oil, myself) over medium heat or flame, turn them after about 3
    minutes and cook another 3 minutes, but keep an eye on them.

    As everyone always says, don't overcrowd the pan. And you don't want to be
    stirring them around a lot unless you have 'hot spots' on the stove or due
    to the shape of your pan. You don't want to *brown* them or they will turn
    into expensive pieces of rubber. When the scallops turn white with no more
    pink, they are opaque and done. And delicious!

    Jill
     
  4. jmcquown wrote:
    > sarah bennett wrote:
    >
    >>[email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
    >>>with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
    >>>because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
    >>>scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
    >>>up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
    >>>them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
    >>>are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
    >>>

    >>
    >>"opaque" means "not translucent anymore".

    >
    >
    > To further clarify... when you get the scallops (and large are good!), they
    > are pinkish. When you cook them they turn white which means they are
    > opaque. I'd say pan-fry in butter (I'd use a blend of 1 Tbs. butter to 1
    > Tbs. olive oil, myself) over medium heat or flame, turn them after about 3
    > minutes and cook another 3 minutes, but keep an eye on them.
    >
    > As everyone always says, don't overcrowd the pan. And you don't want to be
    > stirring them around a lot unless you have 'hot spots' on the stove or due
    > to the shape of your pan. You don't want to *brown* them or they will turn
    > into expensive pieces of rubber. When the scallops turn white with no more
    > pink, they are opaque and done. And delicious!
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    thanks Jill, I was being a bitch. :)

    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  5. I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are. I mean
    they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
     
  6. I know what opaque means. I do not know how to when they are. I mean
    they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
     
  7. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are. I
    > mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?


    No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even touching in the
    center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm? Any pink when you turn
    them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total; no longer than 10. Otherwise
    you get rubber scallops.

    Jill
     
  8. jacqui{JB}

    jacqui{JB} Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]

    > You don't want to *brown* them or they will turn
    > into expensive pieces of rubber. When the scallops
    > turn white with no more pink, they are opaque and
    > done. And delicious!


    For large scallops -- such as the OP's -- I prefer them seared and served
    still translucent (although hopefully warm :)) in the middle. If your
    seafood source is reliable, there shouldn't be safety issues.

    But, then, I've been known to eat them raw, too. :D
    -j
     
  9. sf

    sf Guest

    On 30 Nov 2005 22:21:05 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    > I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are. I mean
    > they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?


    Do you have the scallops NOW? Touch them. They feel sorta like Jello
    Jigglers. When you cook them, as soon as they firm up and don't feel
    like a Jiggler - they are done. Whatever you do, don't over cook
    them!
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  10. [email protected] wrote:
    > I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
    > with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
    > because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
    > scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
    > up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
    > them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
    > are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.


    Cook them fast and hot if you like a seared surface. Two minutes on a
    side in a hot skillet. You can eat scallops raw without safety concerns.
    They're a standard feature of sushi, ceviche and escabeche dishes.

    All you really want to do is to cook them enough to firm up. If the
    centers are still rare, that's fine.

    Pastorio
     
  11. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    > sarah bennett wrote:
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>> I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
    >>> with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
    >>> because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
    >>> scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
    >>> up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
    >>> them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
    >>> are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
    >>>

    >>
    >> "opaque" means "not translucent anymore".

    >
    > To further clarify... when you get the scallops (and large are good!),
    > they
    > are pinkish. When you cook them they turn white which means they are
    > opaque. I'd say pan-fry in butter (I'd use a blend of 1 Tbs. butter to 1
    > Tbs. olive oil, myself) over medium heat or flame, turn them after about 3
    > minutes and cook another 3 minutes, but keep an eye on them.
    >
    > As everyone always says, don't overcrowd the pan. And you don't want to
    > be
    > stirring them around a lot unless you have 'hot spots' on the stove or due
    > to the shape of your pan. You don't want to *brown* them or they will
    > turn
    > into expensive pieces of rubber. When the scallops turn white with no
    > more
    > pink, they are opaque and done. And delicious!
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    I disagree about the browning. A properly done pan searing gives you
    scallops that are lightly browned on the outside and just done on the
    inside, absolutely perfect.


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  12. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are. I
    >> mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?

    >
    > No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even touching in
    > the
    > center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm? Any pink when you turn
    > them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total; no longer than 10. Otherwise
    > you get rubber scallops.
    >
    > Jill
    >

    Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer to
    observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than pink to me.
    Thanks,
    Dee Dee
     
  13. Dee Randall wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>> I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
    >>> I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
    >>>

    >> No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
    >> touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
    >> Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
    >> no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
    >>

    > Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
    > to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
    > pink to me.


    Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
    will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.

    Pastorio
     
  14. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
    >>>> I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
    >>>>
    >>> No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
    >>> touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
    >>> Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
    >>> no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
    >>>

    >> Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
    >> to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
    >> pink to me.

    >
    > Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
    > will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
    >
    > Pastorio


    And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They have
    been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it makes them
    watery and almost impossible to sear properly.


    --
    Peter Aitken
     
  15. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
    > with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
    > because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
    > scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
    > up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
    > them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
    > are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
    >


    Opague means you can't see through them as opposed to being able to see
    shadows though them as they would be if undercooked. The scallops
    should be a creamy white instead of a thinned skim milk look. Be
    careful not to overcook them or they will be rubbery. Scallops cooked
    in garlic butter are a real delight.
     
  16. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    sarah bennett wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
    >> with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
    >> because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
    >> scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
    >> up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
    >> them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
    >> are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
    >>

    >
    > "opaque" means "not translucent anymore".
    >


    It seems to me the OP was asking valid questions. Perhaps he or she
    does not know what opague and translucent means in reference to seafood?
     
  17. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are. I mean
    > they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
    >


    What you could do until you get a feel for the timing is when you think
    they should be ready, cut one to see if it is white throughout. After
    you've made scallops a few times, you'll have the timing so you won't
    have to cut one open.
     
  18. Peter Aitken wrote:
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Dee Randall wrote:
    >>
    >>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>[email protected] wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
    >>>>>I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
    >>>>touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
    >>>>Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
    >>>>no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
    >>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
    >>>pink to me.

    >>
    >>Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
    >>will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
    >>
    >>Pastorio

    >
    > And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They have
    > been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it makes them
    > watery and almost impossible to sear properly.


    Not necessarily, in my experience. The ones that have been soaked are
    called "washed" and are obvious from the milky liquid that gathers
    around them as they leak or "purge" the solution. Scallops will be a
    warm, creamy white color - sometimes almost beige - or lightly tinged
    with orange, or a pale pink, washed or not.

    Pastorio
     
  19. Peter Aitken wrote:
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Dee Randall wrote:
    >>
    >>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>[email protected] wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
    >>>>>I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
    >>>>touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
    >>>>Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
    >>>>no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
    >>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
    >>>pink to me.

    >>
    >>Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
    >>will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
    >>
    >>Pastorio

    >
    > And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They have
    > been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it makes them
    > watery and almost impossible to sear properly.


    Not necessarily, in my experience. The ones that have been soaked are
    called "washed" and are obvious from the milky liquid that gathers
    around them as they leak or "purge" the solution. Scallops will be a
    warm, creamy white color - sometimes almost beige - or lightly tinged
    with orange, or a pale pink, washed or not.

    Pastorio
     
  20. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Peter Aitken wrote:
    >> "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>Dee Randall wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>news:[email protected]
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>[email protected] wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
    >>>>>>I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
    >>>>>touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
    >>>>>Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
    >>>>>no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
    >>>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
    >>>>pink to me.
    >>>
    >>>Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
    >>>will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
    >>>
    >>>Pastorio

    >>
    >> And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They
    >> have been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it
    >> makes them watery and almost impossible to sear properly.

    >
    > Not necessarily, in my experience. The ones that have been soaked are
    > called "washed" and are obvious from the milky liquid that gathers around
    > them as they leak or "purge" the solution. Scallops will be a warm, creamy
    > white color - sometimes almost beige - or lightly tinged with orange, or a
    > pale pink, washed or not.
    >
    > Pastorio


    I think you need to do a little research. First of all it is "wet" scallops,
    not washed, versus dry (unsoaked). Every authority I have seen says the wet
    ones are "stark white" and sometimes unusually plump looking. The slight
    color variations that you describe are the diagnosis of dry scallops. Dry
    scallops can still leak liquid, but it's their natural juices and not a
    tripolyphiosphate solution.


    --
    Peter Aitken
     
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