How to Cook Large Scallops?



P

Peter Aitken

Guest
"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Peter Aitken wrote:
>> "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>
>>>Dee Randall wrote:
>>>
>>>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>>>news:[email protected]
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>[email protected] wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
>>>>>>I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
>>>>>touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
>>>>>Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
>>>>>no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
>>>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
>>>>pink to me.
>>>
>>>Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
>>>will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
>>>
>>>Pastorio

>>
>> And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They
>> have been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it
>> makes them watery and almost impossible to sear properly.

>
> Not necessarily, in my experience. The ones that have been soaked are
> called "washed" and are obvious from the milky liquid that gathers around
> them as they leak or "purge" the solution. Scallops will be a warm, creamy
> white color - sometimes almost beige - or lightly tinged with orange, or a
> pale pink, washed or not.
>
> Pastorio


I think you need to do a little research. First of all it is "wet" scallops,
not washed, versus dry (unsoaked). Every authority I have seen says the wet
ones are "stark white" and sometimes unusually plump looking. The slight
color variations that you describe are the diagnosis of dry scallops. Dry
scallops can still leak liquid, but it's their natural juices and not a
tripolyphiosphate solution.


--
Peter Aitken
 
O

OmManiPadmeOmelet

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Peter Aitken wrote:
> > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> >
> >>Dee Randall wrote:
> >>
> >>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >>>news:[email protected]
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>[email protected] wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
> >>>>>I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
> >>>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
> >>>>touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
> >>>>Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
> >>>>no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
> >>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
> >>>pink to me.
> >>
> >>Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
> >>will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
> >>
> >>Pastorio

> >
> > And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They have
> > been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it makes them
> > watery and almost impossible to sear properly.

>
> Not necessarily, in my experience. The ones that have been soaked are
> called "washed" and are obvious from the milky liquid that gathers
> around them as they leak or "purge" the solution. Scallops will be a
> warm, creamy white color - sometimes almost beige - or lightly tinged
> with orange, or a pale pink, washed or not.
>
> Pastorio


I like to get the ones still in the shell.

With roe.

;-d
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-*****." -Jack Nicholson
 
S

Sheldon

Guest
~patches~ wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
>
> > I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
> > with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
> > because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
> > scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
> > up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
> > them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
> > are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
> >

>
> Opague means you can't see through them as opposed to being able to see
> shadows though them as they would be if undercooked. The scallops
> should be a creamy white instead of a thinned skim milk look. Be
> careful not to overcook them or they will be rubbery. Scallops cooked
> in garlic butter are a real delight.


It's "opaQue", folks.

The easiest and best way to cook scallops is to dust lightly with
seasoned flour and deep fry, about 3 minutes at 365ºF... do not
overload fryer.

Next best method is skewered and grilled... my favorite... intersperse
with shrimp of equal size... when shrimp turn pink scallops are done
too.

Pan fried is the riskiest, most likely to stew/overcook... pan fry one
scallop less than inch diameter of pan (9" pan - 8 scallops), and
choose carefully that all are of equal size/thickness. Stir fried in a
wok is probaby the best way to pan fry scallops... again, do not
overload and if possible cook together with equal sized shrimp to
indicate doneness.

Best no-fail method to test scallop doneness is with an instant-read
skate key! hehe

http://www.gerritsenmemories.com/topicpages/miscellaneous/skates.htm

Sheldon
 
S

Sheldon

Guest
OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> >

> I like to get the ones still in the shell.
>
> With roe.


Whaddaya 'spect from a seafood nympho. hehe

Shelldon Milt
 
O

OmManiPadmeOmelet

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

> ~patches~ wrote:
> > [email protected] wrote:
> >
> > > I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
> > > with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
> > > because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
> > > scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
> > > up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
> > > them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
> > > are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
> > >

> >
> > Opague means you can't see through them as opposed to being able to see
> > shadows though them as they would be if undercooked. The scallops
> > should be a creamy white instead of a thinned skim milk look. Be
> > careful not to overcook them or they will be rubbery. Scallops cooked
> > in garlic butter are a real delight.

>
> It's "opaQue", folks.
>
> The easiest and best way to cook scallops is to dust lightly with
> seasoned flour and deep fry, about 3 minutes at 365ºF... do not
> overload fryer.
>
> Next best method is skewered and grilled... my favorite... intersperse
> with shrimp of equal size... when shrimp turn pink scallops are done
> too.


Oh gods!
When's dinner!?!? ;-)
Hope you add a few skewered fresh mushrooms to that!

>
> Pan fried is the riskiest, most likely to stew/overcook... pan fry one
> scallop less than inch diameter of pan (9" pan - 8 scallops), and
> choose carefully that all are of equal size/thickness. Stir fried in a
> wok is probaby the best way to pan fry scallops... again, do not
> overload and if possible cook together with equal sized shrimp to
> indicate doneness.


That's a good idea.
I have had problems with too much water cooking out of scallops!
Ruins them IMHO.

I might have to fire up the grill tho' and do that instead.
Have bamboo or stainless steel skewers on hand.

>
> Best no-fail method to test scallop doneness is with an instant-read
> skate key! hehe
>
> http://www.gerritsenmemories.com/topicpages/miscellaneous/skates.htm
>
> Sheldon
>


Bad boy. <giggles>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-*****." -Jack Nicholson
 
O

OmManiPadmeOmelet

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > >

> > I like to get the ones still in the shell.
> >
> > With roe.

>
> Whaddaya 'spect from a seafood nympho. hehe
>
> Shelldon Milt
>


<slurp>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-*****." -Jack Nicholson
 
S

Sheldon

Guest
OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > ~patches~ wrote:
> > > [email protected] wrote:
> > >
> > > > I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
> > > > with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
> > > > because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
> > > > scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
> > > > up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
> > > > them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
> > > > are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
> > > >
> > >
> > > Opague means you can't see through them as opposed to being able to see
> > > shadows though them as they would be if undercooked. The scallops
> > > should be a creamy white instead of a thinned skim milk look. Be
> > > careful not to overcook them or they will be rubbery. Scallops cooked
> > > in garlic butter are a real delight.

> >
> > It's "opaQue", folks.
> >
> > The easiest and best way to cook scallops is to dust lightly with
> > seasoned flour and deep fry, about 3 minutes at 365ºF... do not
> > overload fryer.
> >
> > Next best method is skewered and grilled... my favorite... intersperse
> > with shrimp of equal size... when shrimp turn pink scallops are done
> > too.

>
> Oh gods!
> When's dinner!?!? ;-)
> Hope you add a few skewered fresh mushrooms to that!


NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other
And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
SEAFOOD... even yer dumbest crudest filthiest dago knows not to
sprinkle parmesan on the posteriorghetti n' scungilis... yoose wanta
c-menta shooze?

Sheldon Fongool
 
S

Susan

Guest
x-no-archive: yes


jmcquown wrote:
> Dee Randall wrote:
>
>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>
>>>[email protected] wrote:
>>>
>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are. I
>>>>mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
>>>
>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even touching
>>>in the
>>>center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm? Any pink when you
>>>turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total; no longer than 10.
>>>Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
>>>
>>>Jill
>>>

>>
>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
>>pink to me. Thanks,
>>Dee Dee

>
>
> Okay, you're right. They look pinkish grey to me, not pink, not really
> white, either. They aren't pink. But they aren't white, either. God, it's
> hard to describe uncooked translucent seafood!
>
> Jill
>
>


To me, the raw ones look like skim milk, the cooked ones more like whole
milk or cream. They cook up pretty fast, no matter what the method.
They should feel firm in the center under finger pressure, but still
give a bit. Fully firm and they're way past done.

Susan
 
A

aem

Guest
Sheldon wrote:
>
> NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
> take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
> cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other
> And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
> SEAFOOD...


You've been on this kick for a while now. I'll grant you that French
and Italian cuisines traditionally do not mix cheese and seafood.
That's about as far as it goes. Extending this to no mushrooms with
seafood doesn't have even that much basis. If you tried this classic
recipe you'd give up the idea immediately: -aem


Singapore Curry Rice Noodles (from Grace Young)

In Singapore ....almost every restaurant serves mai fun - rice
vermicelli or rice sticks - stir-fried with curry powder, baby shrimp,
scallions, celery, and Chinese mushrooms, for this is one of
Singapore's most famous dishes. The trick in preparing the dried
noodles is to soak them in cold water until they soften before cooking
them. When first placed in cold water they are hard and brittle but
after twenty to thirty minutes they will feel as soft as if they've
been cooked. Drain the noodles well before stir-frying.

4 Chinese dried mushrooms
8 ounces rice vermicelli (mai fun)
2 tablespoons Shao Hsing rice cooking wine [or vermouth, or sherry]
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar [or less]
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 ounces small shrimp, shelled and deveined [raw, may be thawed from
frozen]
1/2 cup finely shredded scallions
1 cup thinly sliced celery
2 teaspoons Madras curry powder [or Madras curry paste]
3/4 cup Homemade Chicken Broth [or low sodium bought broth]
4 ounces Chinese Barbecued Pork, store-bought or homemade, cut into
julienne
In a medium bowl, soak the mushrooms in 1/4 cup cold water for 30
minutes, or until softened. Drain and squeeze dry, reserving soaking
liquid. Cut off and discard stems and thinly slice the caps.

In a large bowl, soak the rice noodles in enough cold water to cover to
20 to 30 minutes, or until noodles are limp and softened. Drain in a
colander and set aside. In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, rice
wine, sugar, and salt. Set aside.

Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok or skillet over high heat until hot
but not smoking. Add 1 tablespoon vegetable oil and the shrimp, and
stir-fry 10 seconds. Add the scallions and stir-fry 30 seconds, or
until shrimp have just turned orange but are not cooked through.
Transfer the shrimp mixture to a plate and set aside.

Add the remaining 2 tablespoon vegetable oil, celery, and sliced
mushrooms, and stir-fry 30 seconds. Add the curry powder and stir-fry
10 seconds, or until fragrant. Restir soy sauce mixture and swirl it
into the wok. Add the chicken broth, reserved mushroom soaking liquid,
and 1/3 cup cold water, and bring to a boil over high heat.

Add the drained rice noodles and return to a boil, stirring noodles to
completely coat in curry mixture. Cover and cook over medium-high heat
2 to 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until noodles are just tender.
Add the shrimp and barbecued pork, and cook, stirring, 1 to 2 minutes,
or until shrimp are just cooked through and liquid has been absorbed by
the noodles. Serve immediately.

Serves 4 to 6 as part of a multicourse meal.

The Wisdom of the Chinese Recipe by Grace Young
 
A

aem

Guest
Sheldon wrote:
>
> NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
> take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
> cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other
> And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
> SEAFOOD...


You've been on this kick for a while now. I'll grant you that French
and Italian cuisines traditionally do not mix cheese and seafood.
That's about as far as it goes. Extending this to no mushrooms with
seafood doesn't have even that much basis. If you tried this classic
recipe you'd give up the idea immediately: -aem


Singapore Curry Rice Noodles (from Grace Young)

In Singapore ....almost every restaurant serves mai fun - rice
vermicelli or rice sticks - stir-fried with curry powder, baby shrimp,
scallions, celery, and Chinese mushrooms, for this is one of
Singapore's most famous dishes. The trick in preparing the dried
noodles is to soak them in cold water until they soften before cooking
them. When first placed in cold water they are hard and brittle but
after twenty to thirty minutes they will feel as soft as if they've
been cooked. Drain the noodles well before stir-frying.

4 Chinese dried mushrooms
8 ounces rice vermicelli (mai fun)
2 tablespoons Shao Hsing rice cooking wine [or vermouth, or sherry]
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar [or less]
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 ounces small shrimp, shelled and deveined [raw, may be thawed from
frozen]
1/2 cup finely shredded scallions
1 cup thinly sliced celery
2 teaspoons Madras curry powder [or Madras curry paste]
3/4 cup Homemade Chicken Broth [or low sodium bought broth]
4 ounces Chinese Barbecued Pork, store-bought or homemade, cut into
julienne
In a medium bowl, soak the mushrooms in 1/4 cup cold water for 30
minutes, or until softened. Drain and squeeze dry, reserving soaking
liquid. Cut off and discard stems and thinly slice the caps.

In a large bowl, soak the rice noodles in enough cold water to cover to
20 to 30 minutes, or until noodles are limp and softened. Drain in a
colander and set aside. In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, rice
wine, sugar, and salt. Set aside.

Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok or skillet over high heat until hot
but not smoking. Add 1 tablespoon vegetable oil and the shrimp, and
stir-fry 10 seconds. Add the scallions and stir-fry 30 seconds, or
until shrimp have just turned orange but are not cooked through.
Transfer the shrimp mixture to a plate and set aside.

Add the remaining 2 tablespoon vegetable oil, celery, and sliced
mushrooms, and stir-fry 30 seconds. Add the curry powder and stir-fry
10 seconds, or until fragrant. Restir soy sauce mixture and swirl it
into the wok. Add the chicken broth, reserved mushroom soaking liquid,
and 1/3 cup cold water, and bring to a boil over high heat.

Add the drained rice noodles and return to a boil, stirring noodles to
completely coat in curry mixture. Cover and cook over medium-high heat
2 to 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until noodles are just tender.
Add the shrimp and barbecued pork, and cook, stirring, 1 to 2 minutes,
or until shrimp are just cooked through and liquid has been absorbed by
the noodles. Serve immediately.

Serves 4 to 6 as part of a multicourse meal.

The Wisdom of the Chinese Recipe by Grace Young
 
P

Peter Aitken

Guest
"aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Sheldon wrote:
>>
>> NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
>> take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
>> cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other
>> And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
>> SEAFOOD...

>
> You've been on this kick for a while now. I'll grant you that French
> and Italian cuisines traditionally do not mix cheese and seafood.
> That's about as far as it goes. Extending this to no mushrooms with
> seafood doesn't have even that much basis. If you tried this classic
> recipe you'd give up the idea immediately: -aem
>
>


Someone should tell sheldoon that we all know he is a nitwit - he does not
have to keep proving it. No mushrooms with seafood! That's rich. Next it'll
be no basil with tomatoes or no garlic with eggplant.


--
Peter Aitken
 
P

Peter Aitken

Guest
"aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Sheldon wrote:
>>
>> NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
>> take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
>> cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other
>> And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
>> SEAFOOD...

>
> You've been on this kick for a while now. I'll grant you that French
> and Italian cuisines traditionally do not mix cheese and seafood.
> That's about as far as it goes. Extending this to no mushrooms with
> seafood doesn't have even that much basis. If you tried this classic
> recipe you'd give up the idea immediately: -aem
>
>


Someone should tell sheldoon that we all know he is a nitwit - he does not
have to keep proving it. No mushrooms with seafood! That's rich. Next it'll
be no basil with tomatoes or no garlic with eggplant.


--
Peter Aitken
 
S

Sheldon

Guest
aem wrote:
> Sheldon wrote:
> >
> > NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
> > take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
> > cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other
> > And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
> > SEAFOOD...

>
> You've been on this kick for a while now. I'll grant you that French
> and Italian cuisines traditionally do not mix cheese and seafood.
> That's about as far as it goes. Extending this to no mushrooms with
> seafood doesn't have even that much basis. If you tried this classic
> recipe you'd give up the idea immediately: -aem
>
>
> Singapore Curry Rice Noodles (from Grace Young)
>
> The Wisdom of the Chinese Recipe by Grace Young


-aem & Grace Young... Taste In Ass Disease

Sheldon Chronic
 
S

Sheldon

Guest
Peter Aitken wrote:
> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > Sheldon wrote:
> >>
> >> NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
> >> take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
> >> cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other
> >> And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
> >> SEAFOOD...

> >
> > You've been on this kick for a while now. I'll grant you that French
> > and Italian cuisines traditionally do not mix cheese and seafood.
> > That's about as far as it goes. Extending this to no mushrooms with
> > seafood doesn't have even that much basis. If you tried this classic
> > recipe you'd give up the idea immediately: -aem
> >
> >

>
>No mushrooms with seafood!



'Zactly! Peter Aitken Taste In Ass Disease II

Sheldon Chronic
 
B

Bob (this one)

Guest
Peter Aitken wrote:
> "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
>
>>Peter Aitken wrote:
>>
>>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
>>>
>>>>Dee Randall wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote
>>>>>
>>>>>>[email protected] wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
>>>>>>>I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
>>>>>>touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
>>>>>>Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
>>>>>>no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
>>>>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
>>>>>pink to me.
>>>>
>>>>Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
>>>>will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
>>>
>>>And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They
>>>have been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it
>>>makes them watery and almost impossible to sear properly.

>>
>>Not necessarily, in my experience. The ones that have been soaked are
>>called "washed" and are obvious from the milky liquid that gathers around
>>them as they leak or "purge" the solution. Scallops will be a warm, creamy
>>white color - sometimes almost beige - or lightly tinged with orange, or a
>>pale pink, washed or not.

>
> I think you need to do a little research. First of all it is "wet" scallops,
> not washed, versus dry (unsoaked). Every authority I have seen says the wet
> ones are "stark white" and sometimes unusually plump looking. The slight
> color variations that you describe are the diagnosis of dry scallops. Dry
> scallops can still leak liquid, but it's their natural juices and not a
> tripolyphiosphate solution.


Peter, I'm not going to get into it with you. I've been buying scallops
for my restaurants since the 70's from professional vendors who taught
me their vocabulary and showed me what to look for when their
competitors tried to mess with me. I've been on boats when they were
dredged and I've cut them out of shells; both sea and bay scallops. In
my restaurants, I served whole scallops in the shells (complete with
roe) that I had flown to me from the Fulton Fish Market when it was in
lower Manhattan. I don't need to consult online authorities now, I've
been dealing with seafood experts for 30 years.

Pastorio
 
B

Bob (this one)

Guest
Peter Aitken wrote:
> "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
>
>>Peter Aitken wrote:
>>
>>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
>>>
>>>>Dee Randall wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote
>>>>>
>>>>>>[email protected] wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
>>>>>>>I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
>>>>>>touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
>>>>>>Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
>>>>>>no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
>>>>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
>>>>>pink to me.
>>>>
>>>>Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
>>>>will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
>>>
>>>And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They
>>>have been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it
>>>makes them watery and almost impossible to sear properly.

>>
>>Not necessarily, in my experience. The ones that have been soaked are
>>called "washed" and are obvious from the milky liquid that gathers around
>>them as they leak or "purge" the solution. Scallops will be a warm, creamy
>>white color - sometimes almost beige - or lightly tinged with orange, or a
>>pale pink, washed or not.

>
> I think you need to do a little research. First of all it is "wet" scallops,
> not washed, versus dry (unsoaked). Every authority I have seen says the wet
> ones are "stark white" and sometimes unusually plump looking. The slight
> color variations that you describe are the diagnosis of dry scallops. Dry
> scallops can still leak liquid, but it's their natural juices and not a
> tripolyphiosphate solution.


Peter, I'm not going to get into it with you. I've been buying scallops
for my restaurants since the 70's from professional vendors who taught
me their vocabulary and showed me what to look for when their
competitors tried to mess with me. I've been on boats when they were
dredged and I've cut them out of shells; both sea and bay scallops. In
my restaurants, I served whole scallops in the shells (complete with
roe) that I had flown to me from the Fulton Fish Market when it was in
lower Manhattan. I don't need to consult online authorities now, I've
been dealing with seafood experts for 30 years.

Pastorio
 
P

Peter Aitken

Guest
"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Peter Aitken wrote:
>> "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
>>>Peter Aitken wrote:
>>>
>>>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
>>>>
>>>>>Dee Randall wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote
>>>>>>>[email protected] wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>I know what opaque means. I do not know how to to when they are.
>>>>>>>>I mean they're white and without cutting them open how do I tell?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>No need to cut them open. You can tell by looking and even
>>>>>>>touching in the center. Any pink in the center? Are they firm?
>>>>>>>Any pink when you turn them over? Opaque. About 6 minutes total;
>>>>>>>no longer than 10. Otherwise you get rubber scallops.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Jill, I've not seen any pink scallops. Should I eyeball them closer
>>>>>>to observe a pinkish tint? They look more on the greyish side than
>>>>>>pink to me.
>>>>>
>>>>>Different varieties will be differently colored. Few will be pink. Some
>>>>>will have a pink "fringe" which is perfectly edible.
>>>>
>>>>And scallops that are all pure white when raw should be avoided. They
>>>>have been soaked in a phosphate solution to improve shelf life and it
>>>>makes them watery and almost impossible to sear properly.
>>>
>>>Not necessarily, in my experience. The ones that have been soaked are
>>>called "washed" and are obvious from the milky liquid that gathers around
>>>them as they leak or "purge" the solution. Scallops will be a warm,
>>>creamy white color - sometimes almost beige - or lightly tinged with
>>>orange, or a pale pink, washed or not.

>>
>> I think you need to do a little research. First of all it is "wet"
>> scallops, not washed, versus dry (unsoaked). Every authority I have seen
>> says the wet ones are "stark white" and sometimes unusually plump
>> looking. The slight color variations that you describe are the diagnosis
>> of dry scallops. Dry scallops can still leak liquid, but it's their
>> natural juices and not a tripolyphiosphate solution.

>
> Peter, I'm not going to get into it with you. I've been buying scallops
> for my restaurants since the 70's from professional vendors who taught me
> their vocabulary and showed me what to look for when their competitors
> tried to mess with me. I've been on boats when they were dredged and I've
> cut them out of shells; both sea and bay scallops. In my restaurants, I
> served whole scallops in the shells (complete with roe) that I had flown
> to me from the Fulton Fish Market when it was in lower Manhattan. I don't
> need to consult online authorities now, I've been dealing with seafood
> experts for 30 years.
>
> Pastorio


Please excuse me, I forgot that you are the World's Chief Expert on food and
that no matter how many authorities disagree with you, they are wrong and
you are right.


--
Peter Aitken
 
O

OmManiPadmeOmelet

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > In article <[email protected]>,
> > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > > ~patches~ wrote:
> > > > [email protected] wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
> > > > > with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
> > > > > because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
> > > > > scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
> > > > > up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
> > > > > them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
> > > > > are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > Opague means you can't see through them as opposed to being able to see
> > > > shadows though them as they would be if undercooked. The scallops
> > > > should be a creamy white instead of a thinned skim milk look. Be
> > > > careful not to overcook them or they will be rubbery. Scallops cooked
> > > > in garlic butter are a real delight.
> > >
> > > It's "opaQue", folks.
> > >
> > > The easiest and best way to cook scallops is to dust lightly with
> > > seasoned flour and deep fry, about 3 minutes at 365ºF... do not
> > > overload fryer.
> > >
> > > Next best method is skewered and grilled... my favorite... intersperse
> > > with shrimp of equal size... when shrimp turn pink scallops are done
> > > too.

> >
> > Oh gods!
> > When's dinner!?!? ;-)
> > Hope you add a few skewered fresh mushrooms to that!

>
> NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
> take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
> cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other


I don't agree...
Sautee'd shrimp and sliced oyster mushrooms are the gods in butter,
olive oil and just a little garlic. Add some quick fried paper thin
strips of rare beef (preferably one of the better cuts) to that and off
you go.

> And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
> SEAFOOD...


That I agree with.
Cheese overwhelms the delicate, sweet flavor of most seafoods.

But I truly do adore fungi with seafood!
The mild flavor of the right mushrooms is VERY complimentary.

Unless you are a mushroom hater??????
I know there are plenty of _those_ out there. <lol>
And I pity y'all. ;-)

In fact, I have plans to purchase a fresh frozen dungeness crab, pick
all the meat out and mix it with various stuff and stuff that inside of
some large portabello mushroom caps and grill them in the electric
grill. ;-d No surimi! Gotta be real crab.

> even yer dumbest crudest filthiest dago knows not to
> sprinkle parmesan on the posteriorghetti n' scungilis... yoose wanta
> c-menta shooze?
>
> Sheldon Fongool


I'd say shel' the mushroom hater? :)


>

--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-*****." -Jack Nicholson
 
O

OmManiPadmeOmelet

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > In article <[email protected]>,
> > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > > ~patches~ wrote:
> > > > [email protected] wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > I have cooked large scallops (the 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 inch kind) in a pan
> > > > > with a lot of butter but I end up cutting the scallops into quarts
> > > > > because I fear they won't cook all the way through. I want the
> > > > > scallops fried in butter. Can I cook them safely without cutting them
> > > > > up? If so how long do I cook them, on what temperture and do I stir
> > > > > them all? How do I know when they are done? The labely says when they
> > > > > are "opaque". I don't exactly know how to tell that.
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > Opague means you can't see through them as opposed to being able to see
> > > > shadows though them as they would be if undercooked. The scallops
> > > > should be a creamy white instead of a thinned skim milk look. Be
> > > > careful not to overcook them or they will be rubbery. Scallops cooked
> > > > in garlic butter are a real delight.
> > >
> > > It's "opaQue", folks.
> > >
> > > The easiest and best way to cook scallops is to dust lightly with
> > > seasoned flour and deep fry, about 3 minutes at 365ºF... do not
> > > overload fryer.
> > >
> > > Next best method is skewered and grilled... my favorite... intersperse
> > > with shrimp of equal size... when shrimp turn pink scallops are done
> > > too.

> >
> > Oh gods!
> > When's dinner!?!? ;-)
> > Hope you add a few skewered fresh mushrooms to that!

>
> NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
> take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
> cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other


I don't agree...
Sautee'd shrimp and sliced oyster mushrooms are the gods in butter,
olive oil and just a little garlic. Add some quick fried paper thin
strips of rare beef (preferably one of the better cuts) to that and off
you go.

> And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
> SEAFOOD...


That I agree with.
Cheese overwhelms the delicate, sweet flavor of most seafoods.

But I truly do adore fungi with seafood!
The mild flavor of the right mushrooms is VERY complimentary.

Unless you are a mushroom hater??????
I know there are plenty of _those_ out there. <lol>
And I pity y'all. ;-)

In fact, I have plans to purchase a fresh frozen dungeness crab, pick
all the meat out and mix it with various stuff and stuff that inside of
some large portabello mushroom caps and grill them in the electric
grill. ;-d No surimi! Gotta be real crab.

> even yer dumbest crudest filthiest dago knows not to
> sprinkle parmesan on the posteriorghetti n' scungilis... yoose wanta
> c-menta shooze?
>
> Sheldon Fongool


I'd say shel' the mushroom hater? :)


>

--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-*****." -Jack Nicholson
 
O

OmManiPadmeOmelet

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:

> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > Sheldon wrote:
> >>
> >> NEVER! No fungi with seafood, not ever! Even the sleaziest Chinky
> >> take-out doesn't mix 'shrooms with seafood... the flavor of either
> >> cancels out the othere, they definitely do not complement each other
> >> And naturally no rennin containing products either, NO CHEESE with
> >> SEAFOOD...

> >
> > You've been on this kick for a while now. I'll grant you that French
> > and Italian cuisines traditionally do not mix cheese and seafood.
> > That's about as far as it goes. Extending this to no mushrooms with
> > seafood doesn't have even that much basis. If you tried this classic
> > recipe you'd give up the idea immediately: -aem
> >
> >

>
> Someone should tell sheldoon that we all know he is a nitwit - he does not
> have to keep proving it. No mushrooms with seafood! That's rich. Next it'll
> be no basil with tomatoes or no garlic with eggplant.


Indeed... ;-)

When I make those crab stuffed portabello caps, I'll be making the
recipe up as I go along (as usual). If it comes out well, I'll take a
picture and post it and the recipe.

Should be good!

Cheers!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-*****." -Jack Nicholson