How to cycle for weight loss

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Daniel Crispin, Jun 5, 2004.

  1. Hello,

    I am wondering if there is an easy way to dose my efforts toward weight
    loss. I could buy
    a HRM but I have already spent 600$ on my bike this month and would like to
    stop spending
    for a while.

    Any trick that can tell me I am using the right effort for weight loss?
    Someone told me that if I cannot
    speak without feeling a little out of breath that is the right zone... is
    that true?

    Also I am been trying to pedal faster. I used to pedal slow and hard but
    after reading some books
    I now understand it's a really bad way to do it. I have no idea what my
    current cadence is since my
    computer doesn't have that feature but I think I am at around 1.25 turn per
    second... that is of course
    an approximate... it would mean 75 turns per minute which is close to what
    is recommanded... I cannot
    see myself pedaling faster, already feels like I am spinning way too fast ;)
    How do you guys do 100 turns
    per minute? Must be a mental issue, the legs don't seems to mind but geez
    at a 100 I am not sure I could
    even keep my balance hehehe!

    Last thing... what should I eat before and during training? I love pasta.
    I know they contain a lot of calories
    but that is the food I like. On the other hand they give lots of carbs so
    that can't be bad while training right?
    Should I eat something different the days I train?

    How about during training? I normal bring a Nutribar which is an meal
    replacement designed for weight loss.
    I has a balance of carbs, fats and proteins. Should I use something with
    more carbs?
     
    Tags:


  2. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "Daniel Crispin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am wondering if there is an easy way to dose my efforts toward weight
    > loss.


    <bunch of stuff snipped>

    Daniel,

    I see lots of folks who take up cycling for weight loss and never lose
    weight. Frankly, it's not exactly the best choice for weight loss because
    it's a non-weight-bearing activity and most folks who have real jobs can't
    do enough of it, or won't work hard enough at it, to get much benefit.

    What I've read and what I believe based on years of observing various
    riders, reading tons of stuff, etc. is that you absolutely will not lose
    weight if you don't ride with some intensity ... at least a couple of times
    a week. There was a long time when the popular theory was that, if you
    spent all your time training in a certain, relatively easy, heart rate zone,
    you were using fat as your fuel source instead of sugar. Therefore, staying
    in that range all the time would make you lose fat. Great theory, but I
    never EVER saw that work for anyone.

    If you want to lose weight on the bike, you have to work HARD on the bike.
    Lots of mile, lots of intervals of intensity, etc.

    I don't have a "real" job. I'm self-employed and have a farm. I have a
    flexible schedule and can ride alot. I get in 250 to 300 miles per week
    pretty much all year round. I don't race, but I do centuries with the racer
    folks and turn in sub-5 hour rides regularly. That's intensity for this 48
    year old body. I say all that to say this ... even with all those miles and
    near-race intensity, if I don't eat right, I gain weight. Carbs like pasta
    can be great fuel before a big ride, but most of the time, if you want to
    lose, you've gotta discipline your diet. I recommend you look at the Zone
    diet and learn its principles. It's not really one of the fad diets. I'm
    not a dietician, but the Zone principles seem to make sense ... balancing
    your fat, protein and carbohydrate intake to keep your blood sugar at
    optimum levels. It's really worked for me.

    One last thing. Crosstraining. Bicycling is great, but I find it really
    helps to add a second activity when I want to lose weight. For me, it's
    just walking. As I said, I live on a farm and I simply walk the property
    each morning. It takes about 20 minutes and gets the motor going. For some
    reason, the addition of a second activity like this really pushes things
    into higher gear for me and I lose weight quickly.

    I hope some of this helps. I'm sure I'm going to get flamed 'cuz I'm not
    offering any specific data to back up what I'm saying. This is just based
    on personal experience and a decade of observation and "study."

    Good luck.
    Bob C.
     
  3. Warren Block

    Warren Block Guest

    Daniel Crispin <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am wondering if there is an easy way to dose my efforts toward
    > weight loss. I could buy a HRM but I have already spent 600$ on my
    > bike this month and would like to stop spending for a while.


    How about free? And probably less biased than most, because it's not
    selling anything:

    http://www.hackersdiet.org

    > Any trick that can tell me I am using the right effort for weight
    > loss? Someone told me that if I cannot speak without feeling a little
    > out of breath that is the right zone... is that true?


    Not necessarily. Ride. Recover. Ride more.

    > Also I am been trying to pedal faster. I used to pedal slow and hard
    > but after reading some books I now understand it's a really bad way to
    > do it.


    As long as the pressure on your knees is low, I don't think it really
    matters how fast you spin.

    > Last thing... what should I eat before and during training? I love
    > pasta. I know they contain a lot of calories but that is the food I
    > like. On the other hand they give lots of carbs so that can't be bad
    > while training right? Should I eat something different the days I
    > train?


    Read the book above. If you want to lose fat, you need to eat fewer
    calories than you burn. In that book, cycling is rated at about 300
    calories per hour. The good news is that is probably for what most
    people think of as cycling--slow, easy rides on a bike path. Most of
    the readers of this newsgroup will burn more.

    > How about during training? I normal bring a Nutribar which is an meal
    > replacement designed for weight loss.
    > I has a balance of carbs, fats and proteins. Should I use something with
    > more carbs?


    How about something less manufactured and more grown? Bananas are good.
    So are apples. So are fig bars, for that matter. (I have mixed
    feelings about the current low-carb fad.)

    --
    Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA
     
  4. I generally read about 35 calories burned per mile for modest biking, dependent
    upon degree of effort, wieght of biker, etc. But, it is a good figure to start
    with.

    Cadence. Look at your watch while pedaling, when it gets to a "0", start
    counting full revolutions until it gets to the next "0". I.e., 20-30, 0-10,
    etc. Multiply the revolutions you counted by 6.

    While not absolutely accurate, it will give you a good diea.

    Over the past 6 years of riding (starting at age 58) my cadence has gone from
    about 60-70 to 90-110, and I can get cadences up to 140-150 if I want.

    It just takes time and practice.

    Use the Zone Diet, or the Body for Life eating plan - they are pretty
    comparable, and the BFL is really easy to implement. It takes exercise AND
    good eating habits to lose weight.

    I bike pretty intensely, getting my heart rate up to about 155 BPM on hills and
    acceleration, which is pretty high for someone age 64.

    Good luck!


    http://members.aol.com/foxcondorsrvtns
    (Colorado rental condo)

    http://members.aol.com/dnvrfox
    (Family Web Page)
     
  5. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Daniel,

    >
    > I see lots of folks who take up cycling for weight loss and never lose
    > weight. Frankly, it's not exactly the best choice for weight loss because
    > it's a non-weight-bearing activity and most folks who have real jobs can't
    > do enough of it, or won't work hard enough at it, to get much benefit.


    I agree that most people can't devote racer-like hours to training, and that
    many people do not possess the intensity to burn lots of calories cycling.
    However, weight-bearing has little effect, I think. The reason people don't
    lose weight when they cycle is because they are consuming more calories than
    they burn. Didn't we have a 100+ thread about this very subject not long
    ago?


    > What I've read and what I believe based on years of observing various
    > riders, reading tons of stuff, etc. is that you absolutely will not lose
    > weight if you don't ride with some intensity ... at least a couple of

    times
    > a week. There was a long time when the popular theory was that, if you
    > spent all your time training in a certain, relatively easy, heart rate

    zone,
    > you were using fat as your fuel source instead of sugar. Therefore,

    staying
    > in that range all the time would make you lose fat. Great theory, but I
    > never EVER saw that work for anyone.


    Because they ate too much. It's easy to do---Powerbars, Gatorade, pre-ride
    pasta gorge, post-ride beers and pizza. If they ate at maintenance level
    calories and rode like you say, they will lose weight.

    > If you want to lose weight on the bike, you have to work HARD on the bike.
    > Lots of mile, lots of intervals of intensity, etc.


    Long slow distance seems to be the rule. Of course, some Poliquin-type
    interval training helps, too. But calories are the key. As bodybuilders say,
    "great abs are made in the kitchen".

    > I don't have a "real" job. I'm self-employed and have a farm. I have a
    > flexible schedule and can ride alot. I get in 250 to 300 miles per week
    > pretty much all year round. I don't race, but I do centuries with the

    racer
    > folks and turn in sub-5 hour rides regularly. That's intensity for this

    48
    > year old body. I say all that to say this ... even with all those miles

    and
    > near-race intensity, if I don't eat right, I gain weight. Carbs like

    pasta
    > can be great fuel before a big ride, but most of the time, if you want to
    > lose, you've gotta discipline your diet. I recommend you look at the Zone
    > diet and learn its principles. It's not really one of the fad diets. I'm
    > not a dietician, but the Zone principles seem to make sense ... balancing
    > your fat, protein and carbohydrate intake to keep your blood sugar at
    > optimum levels. It's really worked for me.


    Good for you. But tricks aside, you cannot escape The Law of Thermodynamics.
    If anyone consumes fewer calories than burned, weight loss will occur. The
    key is burning fat and not excessive amounts of muscle.

    > One last thing. Crosstraining. Bicycling is great, but I find it really
    > helps to add a second activity when I want to lose weight. For me, it's
    > just walking. As I said, I live on a farm and I simply walk the property
    > each morning. It takes about 20 minutes and gets the motor going. For

    some
    > reason, the addition of a second activity like this really pushes things
    > into higher gear for me and I lose weight quickly.


    Weight lifting would be ideal. Growing muscle helps to burn fat. Everybody
    should strength train, if for no other reason than to maintain bone density.
    I don't want to end up a stick-armed old man with great cardio ability. I
    want to end up a strong old man with great cardio ability! :)
     
  6. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >> Daniel,

    > >
    > > I see lots of folks who take up cycling for weight loss and never lose
    > > weight. Frankly, it's not exactly the best choice for weight loss

    because
    > > it's a non-weight-bearing activity and most folks who have real jobs

    can't
    > > do enough of it, or won't work hard enough at it, to get much benefit.

    >
    > I agree that most people can't devote racer-like hours to training, and

    that
    > many people do not possess the intensity to burn lots of calories cycling.
    > However, weight-bearing has little effect, I think. The reason people

    don't
    > lose weight when they cycle is because they are consuming more calories

    than
    > they burn. Didn't we have a 100+ thread about this very subject not long
    > ago?
    >
    >
    > > What I've read and what I believe based on years of observing various
    > > riders, reading tons of stuff, etc. is that you absolutely will not lose
    > > weight if you don't ride with some intensity ... at least a couple of

    > times
    > > a week. There was a long time when the popular theory was that, if you
    > > spent all your time training in a certain, relatively easy, heart rate

    > zone,
    > > you were using fat as your fuel source instead of sugar. Therefore,

    > staying
    > > in that range all the time would make you lose fat. Great theory, but I
    > > never EVER saw that work for anyone.

    >
    > Because they ate too much. It's easy to do---Powerbars, Gatorade, pre-ride
    > pasta gorge, post-ride beers and pizza. If they ate at maintenance level
    > calories and rode like you say, they will lose weight.
    >
    > > If you want to lose weight on the bike, you have to work HARD on the

    bike.
    > > Lots of mile, lots of intervals of intensity, etc.

    >
    > Long slow distance seems to be the rule. Of course, some Poliquin-type
    > interval training helps, too. But calories are the key. As bodybuilders

    say,
    > "great abs are made in the kitchen".
    >
    > > I don't have a "real" job. I'm self-employed and have a farm. I have a
    > > flexible schedule and can ride alot. I get in 250 to 300 miles per week
    > > pretty much all year round. I don't race, but I do centuries with the

    > racer
    > > folks and turn in sub-5 hour rides regularly. That's intensity for this

    > 48
    > > year old body. I say all that to say this ... even with all those miles

    > and
    > > near-race intensity, if I don't eat right, I gain weight. Carbs like

    > pasta
    > > can be great fuel before a big ride, but most of the time, if you want

    to
    > > lose, you've gotta discipline your diet. I recommend you look at the

    Zone
    > > diet and learn its principles. It's not really one of the fad diets.

    I'm
    > > not a dietician, but the Zone principles seem to make sense ...

    balancing
    > > your fat, protein and carbohydrate intake to keep your blood sugar at
    > > optimum levels. It's really worked for me.

    >
    > Good for you. But tricks aside, you cannot escape The Law of

    Thermodynamics.
    > If anyone consumes fewer calories than burned, weight loss will occur. The
    > key is burning fat and not excessive amounts of muscle.
    >
    > > One last thing. Crosstraining. Bicycling is great, but I find it

    really
    > > helps to add a second activity when I want to lose weight. For me, it's
    > > just walking. As I said, I live on a farm and I simply walk the

    property
    > > each morning. It takes about 20 minutes and gets the motor going. For

    > some
    > > reason, the addition of a second activity like this really pushes things
    > > into higher gear for me and I lose weight quickly.

    >
    > Weight lifting would be ideal. Growing muscle helps to burn fat. Everybody
    > should strength train, if for no other reason than to maintain bone

    density.
    > I don't want to end up a stick-armed old man with great cardio ability. I
    > want to end up a strong old man with great cardio ability! :)
    >


    I do core strength work. I believe that's important. Weight training, per
    se, can actually result in gaining weight. If the goal is strictly weight
    loss, I'd opt for some core strength exercises that don't involve much in
    the way of weights. You can do a lot with crunches, pushups, chair dips,
    etc.

    Bob C.
     
  7. AMG

    AMG Guest

    On Sat, 05 Jun 2004 20:30:33 +0000, Warren Block wrote:

    > Daniel Crispin <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I am wondering if there is an easy way to dose my efforts toward
    >> weight loss. I could buy a HRM but I have already spent 600$ on my
    >> bike this month and would like to stop spending for a while.

    >


    Most of the previous posts have been to the point, but numerically (and
    approximately),

    Weight loss = (Calories out - calories in) / 3500.

    If you push on the bike, rather than just cruising, you might burn 500
    calories / hr. But it would still take about seven hours of pedaling to
    burn off one pound of fat, assuming no change in diet. This is why you
    have to watch it in the kitchen, too, since it is not too difficult to add
    back a few hundred calories a day with the pasta, energy bars, etc., etc.
    It doesn't take much, unfortunately...

    The moral: if you want to be a bit more scientific about it, try actually
    adding up the calories. Then you can find out where they came from and
    where they went (and if you're not losing weight, why they didn't went).

    Cheers, and happy pedaling. At least we have fun while we struggle...
     
  8. curt

    curt Guest

    Bicycling is a great way to lose weight! I think most important is to ride
    long and steady to lose. I don't use a HR monitor, so I can't help you
    there, but there is an effective HR for weight loss, but it is different for
    everyone and we would need to know more information about you.

    If you like pasta, it will be harder to lose, unless you don't eat that
    much. Sorry, that is just the way it is. A high carb diet makes it harder
    to lose, it is just the facts. It can certainly be done and is done all the
    time, but you need to cut calories, unless you are going to ride very long
    distances 4+ days a week. I suggest lower fat if you are going high carb.
    If you want to lose faster, then bag the pasta and eat chicken, fish, etc.

    JMHO,
    Curt


    "Daniel Crispin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am wondering if there is an easy way to dose my efforts toward weight
    > loss. I could buy
    > a HRM but I have already spent 600$ on my bike this month and would like

    to
    > stop spending
    > for a while.
    >
    > Any trick that can tell me I am using the right effort for weight loss?
    > Someone told me that if I cannot
    > speak without feeling a little out of breath that is the right zone... is
    > that true?
    >
    > Also I am been trying to pedal faster. I used to pedal slow and hard but
    > after reading some books
    > I now understand it's a really bad way to do it. I have no idea what my
    > current cadence is since my
    > computer doesn't have that feature but I think I am at around 1.25 turn

    per
    > second... that is of course
    > an approximate... it would mean 75 turns per minute which is close to what
    > is recommanded... I cannot
    > see myself pedaling faster, already feels like I am spinning way too fast

    ;)
    > How do you guys do 100 turns
    > per minute? Must be a mental issue, the legs don't seems to mind but geez
    > at a 100 I am not sure I could
    > even keep my balance hehehe!
    >
    > Last thing... what should I eat before and during training? I love pasta.
    > I know they contain a lot of calories
    > but that is the food I like. On the other hand they give lots of carbs so
    > that can't be bad while training right?
    > Should I eat something different the days I train?
    >
    > How about during training? I normal bring a Nutribar which is an meal
    > replacement designed for weight loss.
    > I has a balance of carbs, fats and proteins. Should I use something with
    > more carbs?
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  9. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >>

    > I do core strength work. I believe that's important. Weight training,

    per
    > se, can actually result in gaining weight. If the goal is strictly weight
    > loss, I'd opt for some core strength exercises that don't involve much in
    > the way of weights. You can do a lot with crunches, pushups, chair dips,
    > etc.


    True. But someone who is 150 pounds at 10 percent bodyfat is in far better
    shape than someone who weighs 150 pounds at 20 percent bodyfat. Weight alone
    is not the issue(except for racers). We're not talking about becoming Mr
    Olympia. Just general fitness, and nothing works better at building strength
    than basic compound strength training exercises. Bench press, military
    press, squat, deadlift. Difficult to duplicate with just bodyweight,
    especially once one attains a basic strength level. :)
     
  10. "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Daniel Crispin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I am wondering if there is an easy way to dose my efforts toward weight
    > > loss.

    >
    > <bunch of stuff snipped>
    >
    > Daniel,
    >
    > I see lots of folks who take up cycling for weight loss and never lose
    > weight. Frankly, it's not exactly the best choice for weight loss because
    > it's a non-weight-bearing activity and most folks who have real jobs can't
    > do enough of it, or won't work hard enough at it, to get much benefit.
    >
    > What I've read and what I believe based on years of observing various
    > riders, reading tons of stuff, etc. is that you absolutely will not lose
    > weight if you don't ride with some intensity ... at least a couple of

    times
    > a week. There was a long time when the popular theory was that, if you
    > spent all your time training in a certain, relatively easy, heart rate

    zone,
    > you were using fat as your fuel source instead of sugar. Therefore,

    staying
    > in that range all the time would make you lose fat. Great theory, but I
    > never EVER saw that work for anyone.
    >
    > If you want to lose weight on the bike, you have to work HARD on the bike.


    I put on some weight a couple of years ago from a thyroid condition. About
    15 lbs, which doesn't sound like much but it was on me! It was largely due
    to metabolism. However, I found that I began to lose the weight during the
    cycling season, and the best thing I can advise is lots of long rides.
    Intensity is good, but if fat burning is the goal, long, steady rides are
    best- not necessarily fast, but steady. I began to burn fat, and during the
    winter would work out at the gym. I guess the muscle toning and fat burning
    kick started my slowed-down metabolism and made me burn energy more
    efficiently. I lost all the weight I gained and then some, 20 lbs
    altogether. ANd you won't just lose weight, you'll lose inches.I gained and
    then lost a pant size.

    As for intensity, like hills etc, I think once you build endurance, that
    comes easier. Also as you lose weight, climbing is easier. So get those
    miles and go for a couple of really long rides a week and you'll not only
    lose the weight, you'll keep it off. And when your metabolism is working
    faster, you won't gain too much during the winter, unless you totally stuff
    your face and do nothing but watch tv for four months.
     
  11. "Daniel Crispin" wrote:
    > I am wondering if there is an easy way to dose my efforts toward weight
    > loss.


    > Any trick that can tell me I am using the right effort for weight loss?


    Ride lots.

    If you're looking to lose a lot of weight in a short period of time, the
    latest diet fad may be more effective than cycling. But if you're willing to
    work at it, lose weight gradually, and keep it off (while improving your
    overall fitness and energy level) cycling may be the ticket.

    There's no magic formula, except that you must burn more calories than you
    consume. Daily rides of 10-15 miles are good, but long weekend rides are
    where you will really burn calories. Speed isn't the main thing. Yes, a
    faster pace will burn more calories per hour, but riding the same distance
    at a moderate pace (longer time in the saddle) is almost as good. Don't kill
    yourself, but don't loaf either.

    Combine a sensible diet (and smaller portions) with regular cycling and you
    can't help but lose weight. After a long ride, you metabolism will stay high
    for a couple of hours, helping you to burn calories.

    Make cycling a life-long habit, not just something you're going to do for a
    few months until you reach your target weight. The best way to do that is
    make it fun, not something you have to endure. It may help to join a club or
    ride informally with a few other people, especially on long rides.

    > Someone told me that if I cannot
    > speak without feeling a little out of breath that is the right zone... is
    > that true?


    That sounds like anaerobic threshold training, and is an effective way to
    achieve fitness. But for weight loss it's all about miles.

    > Also I have been trying to pedal faster. I used to pedal slow and hard

    but
    > after reading some books I now understand it's a really bad way to do it.


    Initially, a fast cadence won't feel natural. Try for at least 75-80 rpms.
    Lower gears and a faster cadence may increase your heart rate, but will be
    easier on your legs.

    > Last thing... what should I eat before and during training? I love pasta.
    > I know they contain a lot of calories
    > but that is the food I like. On the other hand they give lots of carbs so
    > that can't be bad while training right?


    Pasta is good, just be mindful of what you put on it.

    > How about during training? I normal bring a Nutribar which is an meal
    > replacement designed for weight loss.


    Definitely don't starve yourself while you're riding, but keep the calorie
    equation in mind (before, during, and after the ride). Normal food is just
    as good (or better) than energy bars. Energy bars can be more convenient.
    See what works best for you.

    Good luck,
    Art Harris
     
  12. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "Daniel Crispin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am wondering if there is an easy way to dose my efforts toward weight
    > loss. I could buy
    > a HRM but I have already spent 600$ on my bike this month and would like

    to
    > stop spending
    > for a while.
    >
    > Any trick that can tell me I am using the right effort for weight loss?
    > Someone told me that if I cannot
    > speak without feeling a little out of breath that is the right zone... is
    > that true?
    >
    > Also I am been trying to pedal faster. I used to pedal slow and hard but
    > after reading some books
    > I now understand it's a really bad way to do it. I have no idea what my
    > current cadence is since my
    > computer doesn't have that feature but I think I am at around 1.25 turn

    per
    > second... that is of course
    > an approximate... it would mean 75 turns per minute which is close to what
    > is recommanded... I cannot
    > see myself pedaling faster, already feels like I am spinning way too fast

    ;)
    > How do you guys do 100 turns
    > per minute? Must be a mental issue, the legs don't seems to mind but geez
    > at a 100 I am not sure I could
    > even keep my balance hehehe!
    >
    > Last thing... what should I eat before and during training? I love pasta.
    > I know they contain a lot of calories
    > but that is the food I like. On the other hand they give lots of carbs so
    > that can't be bad while training right?
    > Should I eat something different the days I train?
    >
    > How about during training? I normal bring a Nutribar which is an meal
    > replacement designed for weight loss.
    > I has a balance of carbs, fats and proteins. Should I use something with
    > more carbs?
    >
    >


    Regarding cadence, I typically ride along at about 90 to 95 rpm and that's
    common among lots of the racer-type folks I train with. Learning to do that
    really transformed my cycling, shaving an hour off my time on some centuries
    (over the course of a couple of seasons as I got the hang of the spin
    thing).

    Some tips ... The spin starts from the hip. Think of the old style
    locomotive where there was a big drive wheel connected to the smaller wheels
    by beams of steel. That's a bit how you should envision your spin. Your
    hip is where the power is that helps drive the pedals. And you need to
    learn to drive the pedals in circles. Make sure you're not just mashing
    down on the pedals each time a foot reaches the top. You should work to
    develop a very smooth pedaling motion where you actually feel power to the
    pedal almost the entire way around the pedal revolution.

    Get a set of rollers. Learn to ride them (they're like learning to ride a
    bike ... you'll have it down in just a few tries). The secret to staying up
    on rollers is speed ... kind of a gyroscopic effect. They force you to
    develop leg speed. Also, if your pedaling dynamics are bad, they really
    cure that, too. You have to pedal smoothly and evenly or you'll be all over
    the rollers (and maybe on the floor ... but that's not to scare you off ...
    they really aren't hard to learn. Just be sure to set them up in a doorway
    at first so you have something to grab if you do start to go down).

    As for determining cadence, count your pedal revolutions (each time your
    right foot reaches the bottom, for example) for 10 seconds and multiply by
    six. Or count them for six seconds and multiply by 10. Or count them for
    15 seconds and multiply by 4. Or count them for 20 seconds and ...

    Bob C.
     
  13. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Sun, 06 Jun 2004 01:50:11 GMT, "curt" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If you like pasta, it will be harder to lose, unless you don't eat that
    >much. Sorry, that is just the way it is. A high carb diet makes it harder
    >to lose, it is just the facts. It can certainly be done and is done all the
    >time, but you need to cut calories, unless you are going to ride very long
    >distances 4+ days a week. I suggest lower fat if you are going high carb.
    >If you want to lose faster, then bag the pasta and eat chicken, fish, etc.
    >
    >JMHO,
    >Curt


    Just one quibble on the 'if you like pasta it will be harder to lose'. I'm
    in complete agreement, but it seems that -some- ppl don't actually have
    'carb addiction', and it is really (so say those ppl) a matter of eating
    less, moving more and having the will power, or determination to continue
    on plan.

    OTOH, if you find you eat 'comfort food', and this food is typically pasta,
    bread, potatoes, then you -might- be a carb addict. If so, low carb, or
    eliminating the cravings should help.

    My feeling is when I'm in the right place in my low carb diet, I don't have
    any 'cravings' for food. Going through the 'induction phase' was crucial
    for my success.

    But if you don't have cravings, then any diet will probably work.

    -B

    -Badger
    "World's most dangerous City Bike Path Rider"
     
  14. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Sun, 06 Jun 2004 00:53:49 GMT, AMG <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If you push on the bike, rather than just cruising, you might burn 500
    >calories / hr. But it would still take about seven hours of pedaling to
    >burn off one pound of fat, assuming no change in diet. This is why you
    >have to watch it in the kitchen, too, since it is not too difficult to add
    >back a few hundred calories a day with the pasta, energy bars, etc., etc.
    >It doesn't take much, unfortunately...


    Interesting calculation, since many beginner/intermediate bikes seem to
    ride about 7 hours a week.

    OK, that's over-simplified, but if it translates into a pound loss of fat
    per week, that's pretty good.

    I lose about 2-2.5 lbs per week during the 'optimal phase' of my dieting,
    and then level off to about 1-1.5 lb per week on diet alone.

    If you're recomposing and adding muscle to your legs, a wild ass guess, it
    seems to me, would show a 2lb loss per week, with maybe 1/4lb per week gain
    of muscle, maybe. So a 6-8lb loss of body weight per month, with, hopefully
    most of the loss being fat, plus a net gain of 1 lb of muscle per month (if
    you're biking hard and are a beginner), gives a final weight flux of minus
    5-7lbs per month. This is what I'm seeing. (Note that it's almost
    impossible to lose fat and gain muscle at the same time, but it can happen
    for beginners.)

    As you get closer to goal, naturally, you'll have sticking points and the
    rate of fat loss and muscle gain will slow.

    Again, just wild ass guessing, off the top of my head, here. ;-p

    -B

    -Badger
    "World's most dangerous City Bike Path Rider"
     
  15. Mike Schwab

    Mike Schwab Guest

    Marlene Blanshay wrote:
    <snip>
    > As for intensity, like hills etc, I think once you build endurance, that
    > comes easier. Also as you lose weight, climbing is easier. So get those
    > miles and go for a couple of really long rides a week and you'll not only
    > lose the weight, you'll keep it off. And when your metabolism is working
    > faster, you won't gain too much during the winter, unless you totally stuff
    > your face and do nothing but watch tv for four months.


    Winter is training time for the Iditarod Impossible.
    http://www.ultimateiditarod.com/Iditarod/update4.htm
    http://www.icebike.org
    http://www.bikewinter.org
     
  16. Mike Schwab

    Mike Schwab Guest

    Look for breads and pastas made with whole grain. Check health food
    stores.

    curt wrote:
    >
    > Bicycling is a great way to lose weight! I think most important is to ride
    > long and steady to lose. I don't use a HR monitor, so I can't help you
    > there, but there is an effective HR for weight loss, but it is different for
    > everyone and we would need to know more information about you.
    >
    > If you like pasta, it will be harder to lose, unless you don't eat that
    > much. Sorry, that is just the way it is. A high carb diet makes it harder
    > to lose, it is just the facts. It can certainly be done and is done all the
    > time, but you need to cut calories, unless you are going to ride very long
    > distances 4+ days a week. I suggest lower fat if you are going high carb.
    > If you want to lose faster, then bag the pasta and eat chicken, fish, etc.
    >
    > JMHO,
    > Curt

    <snip>
     
  17. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Sun, 06 Jun 2004 16:53:09 -0500, Mike Schwab <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Look for breads and pastas made with whole grain. Check health food
    >stores.


    Why? It's still going to spike your insulin. Tch; even the LC people tout
    this, but it's still bread.

    -Badger
    "World's most dangerous City Bike Path Rider"
     
  18. Mike Schwab

    Mike Schwab Guest

    Sorry, wrong link.
    Organizer's site http://www.alaskaultrasport.com/
    Photo gallery
    http://www.justridingalong.com/racing/iditabike_photo_gallery.php
    Story http://www.justridingalong.com/racing/iditabike2004.php
    CNN news story http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/01/14/offbeat.iditarod.ap/

    Mike Schwab wrote:
    >
    > Marlene Blanshay wrote:
    > <snip>
    > > As for intensity, like hills etc, I think once you build endurance, that
    > > comes easier. Also as you lose weight, climbing is easier. So get those
    > > miles and go for a couple of really long rides a week and you'll not only
    > > lose the weight, you'll keep it off. And when your metabolism is working
    > > faster, you won't gain too much during the winter, unless you totally stuff
    > > your face and do nothing but watch tv for four months.

    >
    > Winter is training time for the Iditarod Impossible.
    > http://www.ultimateiditarod.com/Iditarod/update4.htm
    > http://www.icebike.org
    > http://www.bikewinter.org
     
  19. Mike Schwab

    Mike Schwab Guest

    With the whole grain bread / pasta, the sugar is consumed with the fiber
    and is absorbed slower.
    With the white bread, the sugar is absorbed very quickly.
    This difference wass measured by having testing persons eating a
    quantity of food then testing their blood surar.

    This is from Dr. Arthur Agaston's book South Beach diet.

    http://www.southbeachdiet.com/
    http://www.glycemicindex.com/

    Badger_South wrote:
    >
    > On Sun, 06 Jun 2004 16:53:09 -0500, Mike Schwab <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Look for breads and pastas made with whole grain. Check health food
    > >stores.

    >
    > Why? It's still going to spike your insulin. Tch; even the LC people tout
    > this, but it's still bread.
    >
    > -Badger
    > "World's most dangerous City Bike Path Rider"
     
  20. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    Before you go and cite some 'South Beach diet' or something, "Whole grain"
    bread -still- spikes insulin, and in some people, just as strongly as white
    bread.

    If I were to start eating whole grain pasta and bread, I'd quickly
    re-acquire my 'carb addiction'. So to suggest this to those on LC is
    specious at best and purposefully misleading at worst.



    On Sun, 06 Jun 2004 18:02:30 -0500, Mike Schwab <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >With the whole grain bread / pasta, the sugar is consumed with the fiber
    >and is absorbed slower.
    >With the white bread, the sugar is absorbed very quickly.
    >This difference wass measured by having testing persons eating a
    >quantity of food then testing their blood surar.
    >
    >This is from Dr. Arthur Agaston's book South Beach diet.
    >
    >http://www.southbeachdiet.com/
    >http://www.glycemicindex.com/
    >
    >Badger_South wrote:
    >>
    >> On Sun, 06 Jun 2004 16:53:09 -0500, Mike Schwab <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Look for breads and pastas made with whole grain. Check health food
    >> >stores.

    >>
    >> Why? It's still going to spike your insulin. Tch; even the LC people tout
    >> this, but it's still bread.
    >>
    >> -Badger
    >> "World's most dangerous City Bike Path Rider"



    -Badger
    "World's most dangerous City Bike Path Rider"
     
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