How to Deal with Hostile Security

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by [email protected], Apr 28, 2006.

  1. I have been commuting to work for many years. I recently relocated my
    office to a new complex. And the hassles for security have reached an
    all-time level. I park the bicycle at the only racks in the complex
    (two buildings away in the garage) and as soon as I get off the bicycle
    I am surrounded by security questioning whether I actually work in the
    building. Today I parked and didn't specifically see any security and
    so I walked down to the lobby of my building and entered. At which
    point I was told by the Security guard in the lobby to "freeze" and I
    was told to identify myself and state my business in the building. It
    took 15 minutes before they allowed me to go up to my office.

    I can't keep putting up with this. I need to try to figure out a
    better solution. The head of security said that it was necessary to do
    this as they were concerned that bicyclists might use the building's
    racks and then go and use the Subway next to the building. This
    ignores the fact that the building has lousy old 1960's style racks
    which provide poor locking surfaces and that the CTA station has many
    brand new high tech racks, a number of "bicycle locking bubbles", and
    CTA security personnel next to the racks. I really don't want to
    start parking at the CTA station, but I am thinking that this may be my
    "best option.

    BTW. I commute only 12 miles in each direction and my bike of
    preference is a 1970's rebuilt road bike. I have three of them and
    switch off depending on my mood. (a 21 speed, an 18 speed and a 12
    speed... all with different ranges of gears). Its a heck of a lot
    better to commute on one of these than on those horrible things now
    being passed off as "city bikes" and not nearly as expensive and more
    durable than a high tech road bike.
     
    Tags:


  2. You could make yourself an official-looking badge with your picture on
    it and the address of your office (got PhotoShop?). Laminate it and
    wear it on a lanyard around your neck or clip it to your shirt. If
    you get hassled by the man, flash your badge, thank them for being so
    diligent in doing their jobs, and politely remind them that they work
    for you (albeit indirectly).

    Good luck!

    - Forbes B-Black
     
  3. Have you tried complaining to HR? Not that I hold HR in high regard,
    but they've got to be good for something.

    I'm surprised that your employer doesn't have ID badges, given that
    they actually have security guards. I've never worked anywhere that
    had the latter without the former. If you have an ID badge and are
    wearing it, ask why they are giving you a hassle when you obviously
    work there.

    Jeff
     
  4. Thanks. I guess so. On the other hand, they do not cross examine
    every person who walks into the building (cars, pedestrians, transit
    riders) and quite honestly, I am more than a little po'd about being
    focused on merely becuase I happened to ride a bicycle.
     
  5. Its a bit more complex than that. Most of the building is the offices
    of a large bank and most of the people work for the Bank. But some of
    the space is rented out to outside tennants. That would be me. In
    fact my name is one of the few names on the Directory. And I believe
    that our society is over-regulated and will not issue ID's to my
    employees. (In addition, real and effective security does not use
    ID's. People get lazy and look at the ID and not the person on the
    conduct.)
     
  6. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 28 Apr 2006 14:15:38 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >I have been commuting to work for many years. I recently relocated my
    >office to a new complex. And the hassles for security have reached an
    >all-time level. I park the bicycle at the only racks in the complex
    >(two buildings away in the garage) and as soon as I get off the bicycle
    >I am surrounded by security questioning whether I actually work in the
    >building. Today I parked and didn't specifically see any security and
    >so I walked down to the lobby of my building and entered. At which
    >point I was told by the Security guard in the lobby to "freeze" and I
    >was told to identify myself and state my business in the building. It
    >took 15 minutes before they allowed me to go up to my office.
    >
    >I can't keep putting up with this. I need to try to figure out a
    >better solution.


    My advice: Use the chain of command. Report the problem to your
    supervisor, and note that the security people are actively
    interefering with your ability to get to work on time despite your
    having done nothing that is outside of company-permitted actions. If
    this doesn't achieve the needed result, ask what accommodation the
    company can provide to alleviate the problem.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  7. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 28 Apr 2006 14:57:43 -0700, "David the Nationals Fan"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Its a bit more complex than that. Most of the building is the offices
    >of a large bank and most of the people work for the Bank. But some of
    >the space is rented out to outside tennants. That would be me. In
    >fact my name is one of the few names on the Directory. And I believe
    >that our society is over-regulated and will not issue ID's to my
    >employees. (In addition, real and effective security does not use
    >ID's. People get lazy and look at the ID and not the person on the
    >conduct.)


    Ah. Well, then, it's time to call the people who are responsible for
    the lease on your office, and hand off the matter to *them*, stating
    that if the Security people can't be trained, you'll have little
    choice but to seek another office space, and unless they are willing
    to foot the bill for moving you and paying the incidental costs
    associated, perhaps they should get the matter resolved promptly.

    *You* should not have to fix this problem.

    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  8. On 28 Apr 2006 14:57:43 -0700, "David the Nationals Fan"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Its a bit more complex than that. Most of the building is the offices
    >of a large bank and most of the people work for the Bank. But some of
    >the space is rented out to outside tennants. That would be me. In
    >fact my name is one of the few names on the Directory. And I believe
    >that our society is over-regulated and will not issue ID's to my
    >employees. (In addition, real and effective security does not use
    >ID's. People get lazy and look at the ID and not the person on the
    >conduct.)


    Do I understand correctly that you are renting space there (not
    working for someone who rents space,but are the actual renter)? If so,
    complain to whomever you rented it from.

    CMM
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Today I parked and didn't specifically see any security and
    > so I walked down to the lobby of my building and entered. At which
    > point I was told by the Security guard in the lobby to "freeze" and I
    > was told to identify myself and state my business in the building. It
    > took 15 minutes before they allowed me to go up to my office.


    The next time this happens, do this:

    1. If it's the same guards every day, say "I work here, same as I did
    yesterday. Why are you singling me out for harrassment every single day?
    Don't you recognize me by now?"

    2. Find out which security firm they work for, and call them to
    complain. Let them know that security at building so-and-so are
    harrassing you because of your appearance, that you are a paying tenant
    of the building, and that this needs to stop. If possible, get the names
    of the guards, and cite them specifically.

    3. Contact building management, and repeat step (2) with them. Let them
    know that /their/ security are harrassing paying tenants, and they'll
    generally make it stop. If not, remind them that you'll be glad to take
    your business elsewhere when your lease is up.

    > I can't keep putting up with this. I need to try to figure out a
    > better solution. The head of security said that it was necessary to do
    > this as they were concerned that bicyclists might use the building's
    > racks and then go and use the Subway next to the building.


    That doesn't excuse harrassing you *every day*. They should recognize
    you by now. Remind him of that fact next time this happens.

    --

    __o Kristian Zoerhoff
    _'\(,_ [email protected]
    (_)/ (_)
     
  10. I like your attitude with regard to over-regulation and ID. At a prior
    employer (>10,000 employees), one of my coworkers replaced his ID
    picture with that of Homer Simpson and was not noticed for weeks.

    Given that your name is on the directory of the building, talk to your
    landlord. He pays the security folks and you pay him. Follow the
    money.

    Jeff
     
  11. Cathy Kearns

    Cathy Kearns Guest

    "Kristian M Zoerhoff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > > I can't keep putting up with this. I need to try to figure out a
    > > better solution. The head of security said that it was necessary to do
    > > this as they were concerned that bicyclists might use the building's
    > > racks and then go and use the Subway next to the building.

    >
    > That doesn't excuse harrassing you *every day*. They should recognize
    > you by now. Remind him of that fact next time this happens.


    And you should recognize them by now too. A cheery "Good morning! <insert
    security guard's name here>" would tend to remind them you belong there.

    Sometimes the little people just like to be recognized.
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > I have been commuting to work for many years. I recently relocated my
    > office to a new complex. And the hassles for security have reached an
    > all-time level.


    It sounds like you're the business owner, if you're the one who
    relocated the office, right? If so, skip security and talk to your
    property manager, tell them this sort of treatment is unacceptable and
    you want it fixed. Security is hired help, they have to do what
    management tells them. You're paying the rent, management cares what
    you think of their hired help. Or, if they don't, maybe it's time to
    find a new landlord.

    Personally, as a business owner, I have an official written policy that
    my bike goes into my office, and I spoke to the property manager about
    it before leasing my space.

    --
    [email protected] is Joshua Putnam
    <http://www.phred.org/~josh/>
    Braze your own bicycle frames. See
    <http://www.phred.org/~josh/build/build.html>
     
  13. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On 28 Apr 2006 14:15:38 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >I have been commuting to work for many years. I recently relocated my
    >office to a new complex. And the hassles for security have reached an
    >all-time level. I park the bicycle at the only racks in the complex
    >(two buildings away in the garage) and as soon as I get off the bicycle
    >I am surrounded by security questioning whether I actually work in the
    >building. Today I parked and didn't specifically see any security and
    >so I walked down to the lobby of my building and entered. At which
    >point I was told by the Security guard in the lobby to "freeze" and I
    >was told to identify myself and state my business in the building. It
    >took 15 minutes before they allowed me to go up to my office.
    >
    >I can't keep putting up with this. I need to try to figure out a
    >better solution. The head of security said that it was necessary to do
    >this as they were concerned that bicyclists might use the building's
    >racks and then go and use the Subway next to the building. This
    >ignores the fact that the building has lousy old 1960's style racks
    >which provide poor locking surfaces and that the CTA station has many
    >brand new high tech racks, a number of "bicycle locking bubbles", and
    >CTA security personnel next to the racks. I really don't want to
    >start parking at the CTA station, but I am thinking that this may be my
    >"best option.
    >
    >BTW. I commute only 12 miles in each direction and my bike of
    >preference is a 1970's rebuilt road bike. I have three of them and
    >switch off depending on my mood. (a 21 speed, an 18 speed and a 12
    >speed... all with different ranges of gears). Its a heck of a lot
    >better to commute on one of these than on those horrible things now
    >being passed off as "city bikes" and not nearly as expensive and more
    >durable than a high tech road bike.


    You don't mention the pointed discussion you had with the landlord/ building
    management and your recommendation that they retain a _competent_ security
    agency. Perhaps a friendly or retained attorney might explain it with painful
    clarity in a brief letter.

    This is not a bicycle problem.

    Ron
     
  14. Richard B

    Richard B Guest

    Joshua Putnam <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >> I have been commuting to work for many years. I recently relocated
    >> my office to a new complex. And the hassles for security have
    >> reached an all-time level.

    >
    > It sounds like you're the business owner, if you're the one who
    > relocated the office, right? If so, skip security and talk to your
    > property manager, tell them this sort of treatment is unacceptable and
    > you want it fixed. Security is hired help, they have to do what
    > management tells them. You're paying the rent, management cares what
    > you think of their hired help. Or, if they don't, maybe it's time to
    > find a new landlord.
    >
    > Personally, as a business owner, I have an official written policy
    > that my bike goes into my office, and I spoke to the property manager
    > about it before leasing my space.
    >



    My company leases space in an office building.
    I do not own the business but my bike goes with me into the office.
    The security guards see me every morning on their cameras as I wheel the
    bike down the hallway into the office (make sure the tires are clean),
    they all know me now and ask how my ride was each morning. Because I
    bring my bike into the building I even get chances to try to recruit
    others into the bike commute world; unfortunately I have not succeeded
    yet, but I will continue to be an advocate.


    Rich
     
  15. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote: (clip) I park the bicycle at the only
    racks in the complex (two buildings away in the garage) and as soon as I get
    off the bicycle I am surrounded by security questioning whether I actually
    work in the building. (clip)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    You use the parking facilities provided. If you get hassled, I guess we can
    assume that any bicycle rider who uses those racks gets hassled also. What
    do you suppose the intended purpose of the racks is--they don't seem to want
    them to be used by anyone.
     
  16. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote: (clip) Today I parked and didn't
    specifically see any security and so I walked down to the lobby of my
    building and entered. At which point I was told by the Security guard in
    the lobby to "freeze" and I was told to identify myself and state my
    business in the building. (clip)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    How is this consistent with their claim that they are doing this to prevent
    the racks from being used by CTA riders?

    "Freeze?" That's even too corny for today's TV scripts. Did they make you
    "Spread 'em?"
     
  17. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 00:15:33 GMT, "Cathy Kearns"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Kristian M Zoerhoff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> > I can't keep putting up with this. I need to try to figure out a
    >> > better solution. The head of security said that it was necessary to do
    >> > this as they were concerned that bicyclists might use the building's
    >> > racks and then go and use the Subway next to the building.

    >>
    >> That doesn't excuse harrassing you *every day*. They should recognize
    >> you by now. Remind him of that fact next time this happens.

    >
    >And you should recognize them by now too. A cheery "Good morning! <insert
    >security guard's name here>" would tend to remind them you belong there.
    >
    > Sometimes the little people just like to be recognized.


    When they act *this* little, they need to be squashed like the bugs
    they are. OTOH, knowing their names, and finding out the names of
    their supervisors and of the manager of the security firm's branch
    office nearby, might unnerve them a bit. There are times when one
    must use devious means to disarm an adversary.


    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  18. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Claire Petersky" <cpeters[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>I like your attitude with regard to over-regulation and ID. At a prior
    >> employer (>10,000 employees), one of my coworkers replaced his ID
    >> picture with that of Homer Simpson and was not noticed for weeks.

    >
    >
    > My husband had a badge with the visage of Mike Tyson.
    >

    When I misplaced my ID, I just waved my Jewel Preferred Card (supermarket
    frequent shopper card) and this worked for a few days until I found my ID
    again. This won't work any more because we now use RFID.

    The use of RFID's seems to have eliminated the periodic waves of purse
    robberies in the building. I think life is a balance, and if it makes the
    building where I work safer I think ID's are worth the tradeoff. Cameras as
    well -- the company's only going to have one security guard at night for our
    two interconnected buildings, and electronics can provide a help.
     
  19. On 28 Apr 2006 14:15:38 -0700 in rec.bicycles.misc,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > I park the bicycle at the only racks in the complex
    > (two buildings away in the garage) and as soon as I get off the bicycle
    > I am surrounded by security questioning whether I actually work in the
    > building. Today I parked and didn't specifically see any security and
    > so I walked down to the lobby of my building and entered. At which
    > point I was told by the Security guard in the lobby to "freeze" and I
    > was told to identify myself and state my business in the building. It
    > took 15 minutes before they allowed me to go up to my office.


    are you a tenant, or an employee of a tenant? if you are the
    tenant, complain to the landlord, and ask them to distribute your
    picture (with your bike) to the security folks. and tell the
    landlord that you consider this kind of heavy-handed idiocy a
    violation of your lease! do they drive your customers/clients
    away doing the same thing?

    the worst thing that 9/11 did was to make a bunch of retired cops
    into double-dipping "security experts" who couldn't protect a
    building to save their lives. the terrorists have won.

    if you're an employee of a tenant, have your boss file a
    complaint with the landlord about the idiots running their
    "security".
     
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