How to determine age & size of bikes

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by bellaluca, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. bellaluca

    bellaluca New Member

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    I have a Cannondale R700 and a GF Bontrager. I am having a hard time determing the exact size and age of these bikes. Please help! Serial #s Q032246 &WL31767682 respectively. Thanks in advance :) Sharon
     
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  2. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    Size is best determined by using a yardstick or tape measure. The bike size is usually the distance from the center of the crank to the center of the top tube. If you are selling, people will also be interested in the top tube length (from center of seat tube to center of head tube) and stand over height (distance from the floor to the top of the top tube.

    I can't help on the serial numbers, but if you check the components, they many times have date codes that can be used to approximate the dates. One place to look for date code information is vintage-trek.com.
     
  3. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    Cannondale used to code the size and manufacture date into the beginning of the serial number, [size(2 digits)date(mmddyy)] but your's looks shorter. You might be able to narrow it down based on the decals and components if you can find some old catalog scans.
     
  4. darkhelmet

    darkhelmet New Member

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    Road bikes and Mountain bikes are measured differently. The size of a Cannondale road frame is measured from the center of the crank to the top of the top tube. I verified this from my own SR 500.
    Mountain bikes are measured from the center of the crank to the top of the seat tube. However, I've seen this measured in shops using two slightly different methods. One way is to take the measurement holding the tape against the seat tube. The other is to hold a level at the top of the seat tube and run the tape straight up to the level from the center of the crank. I don't think there's much of a difference between these two methods.
     
  5. bellaluca

    bellaluca New Member

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    Yes, I found that out. So I had to measure the GF over and came up with 18.5" c to c and stand over 32". Does that sound accurate proportially? BTW, They are both 2005 models.
     
  6. darkhelmet

    darkhelmet New Member

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    Sorry, That does not sound right. I'm assuming your GF is a mountain bike. It sounds like the frame is a little larger or the standover is not that high. I think you're off by about 1"- 1.5" somewhere in the measurements. As an example, our 18" frame (marked by Trek as 18" and I measured it at 18") has a standover of just under 30". An 18.5 frame would have a standover of less than 31".
     
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