How to do a rolling enclosure without too much $$$

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Monkeyhillcs, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Monkeyhillcs

    Monkeyhillcs Guest

    I can't post to RBR but here is a response to the dude who wanted to know how I can shit down roads
    in Lancaster

    The most efficient way to run a road race while being able to use the whole road is to find a
    circuit between 2.5 and 8 miles long (can be longer, but I like to keep it simple). Get the local
    municipality to declare the roads one way for the duration of the racing. Post fire police at each
    intersection directing the cars the same way as the way the riders are going. Put a pace car in
    front of and in back of the field for further protection ( this works best with police cars).
    Typically the most a person has to go out of their way is one full lap of the course, but if you are
    tricky and come up with detour routes and inform people either through a letter and/or maps to the
    fire police you can usually reduce the detour distance to a couple of miles. This is easier to
    convince the muni to do than you might think. The selling points are that the roads are not closed,
    they are detoured which is something that most munis are more familiar with, not only are emergency
    vehicles given priority over the race, but emergency reponse in the area for the day is increased as
    you will have fire police and ambulances in the immeidate are on the day. Of course good business
    practice would suggest that you write the homes directly affected by the race to inform them of the
    race and invite them to watch, that you use and make a donation to the local sports booster club for
    marshalling assistance, and that you make the local elected officials part of the program.

    That takes some work and perhaps a little bit of money, but is an effective and financially
    reasonable way to put on a good safe race.
     
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  2. Monkeyhillcs wrote:

    > I can't post to RBR but here is a response to the dude who wanted to know how I can shit down
    > roads in Lancaster

    Please please please tell me that was a typo. STF
     
  3. Brian Batke

    Brian Batke Guest

    [email protected] (Monkeyhillcs) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > The most efficient way to run a road race while being able to use the whole road is to find a
    > circuit between 2.5 and 8 miles long (can be longer, but I like to keep it simple). Get the local
    > municipality to declare the roads one way for the duration of the racing.

    Even if you have cops direcing traffic one way at the intersections, what do you do about people --
    residents,etc. -- who decide to pull out of their driveway or business and go opposite the race's
    direction?

    This will almost certainly happen, even if you write to the people who live on the course. Who
    hasn't seen cars go around cones and barricades and get on a crit course? People will always
    find a way.

    I have a course that I would really like to do w/out the center line rule. It is about 8.5 miles ...
    but there are many residents. I have done races on the course the last 2 years, with a yellow line
    rule. For the biggest field (1/2/3) I was able to get the police to 'push' oncoming traffic off the
    road and to the berm. This was for safety purposes. We still told the riders there was a yellow line
    rule because I couldn't ensure a complete closure.

    I had police as lead vehicle and 2 motorcycles with officials. If a break goes away, and the lead
    vehicle with it, then the field is unprotected or protected only by a moto.

    Another problem I see is that if you say there is no yellow line rule, and a car gets on the course,
    and someone gets hurt, then you are setting yourself up for trouble as a promoter.

    Finding a road course with no residents or businesses is virtually impossible.

    I would really like to put on a race with road closure. I have done Altoona and other races that
    close the roads, and it makes for a much better race experience. It seems that in those races, there
    are many cops and motos, and they will push all oncoming traffic off onto the berm. It didn't appear
    to me that the road was totally free of cars.

    Brian
     
  4. > Even if you have cops direcing traffic one way at the intersections, what do you do about people
    > -- residents,etc. -- who decide to pull out of their driveway or business and go opposite the
    > race's direction?

    It takes additional motor marshals and police. Also some additional stationary volunteers/police and
    good communications. And you are correct in your assumption about trouble if a break gets up the
    road. The general rule of thumb is that you need to "fill" the space between the lead police and all
    groups on the road with police and/or motors.

    One thing all promoters need to remember is that for us being out there on the road with police and
    motorcycles may be a weekly thing. However for John
    Q. Public who is suddenly confronted with blue lights and a motor marshal trying to yell through a
    helmet the experience can be quite traumatic.

    There is no single formula for a rolling enclosure/full-road type of race. Different courses and
    different areas require different security arrangements. However (take it from me) you are correct
    in your thinking that if not done properly a rolling enclosure can be a real mess.

    Chuck Hodge
     
  5. Bob Schwartz

    Bob Schwartz Guest

    Monkeyhillcs <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Put a pace car in front of and in back of the field for further protection ( this works best with
    > police cars).

    That's field, singular, right?

    This is interesting stuff and I'll file it away in long term memory. But if all you are running is a
    single field then a lot of things are possible that are not possible if you are running a more
    complex race. Actually, I think that if you are running multiple fields you have to run a lot more
    complex race because you need small field sizes. That is the approach for most USAC road races here
    take. You run a lot of smaller fields and possibly hire a lot of officials to breath down each
    field's neck to keep them in right of center.

    If VOS was indeed large fields on busy roads then JL is probably correct in concluding that it is an
    unreasonably hairy race. But I haven't seen anything that makes me think that a rolling enclosure
    will work for the mainstream road race.

    Bob Schwartz [email protected]
     
  6. Mriordan95

    Mriordan95 Guest

    Many states have very powerful police unions. In Massachusetts, the only people allowed to do any
    type of traffic control involving motor vehicles are police officers (non-paid "fire police" are
    non-existent in Massachusetts). Road race marshals are not legally allowed to direct motor vehicle
    traffic. They can "assist" the paid duty police officer. Marshals can only do crowd control.

    Police and traffic control costs add a tremendous amount to overall race budgets in many states
    because the use of volunteers has very tight restrictions (and the race sponsor is looking for
    maximum exposure). Even the old Tour du Trump, after one "trip" into Massachusetts didn't want to
    come back because of the high costs associated with traffic control.

    The police union is so powerful in that state that road construction projects are not allowed to use
    flag "people". They must hire paid police officers for any type of traffic control. I am former
    resident of Massachusetts and promoted road races in New England. I now live in Pennsylvania and
    have noticed a big difference regarding traffic control in each state.
     
  7. Chuck Hodge

    Chuck Hodge Guest

    > They can "assist" the paid duty police officer. Marshals can only do
    crowd
    > control.

    A good point...and in most cases the way it actually should be. I have had cars literally push
    barricades into me at all kinds of events (not just cycling). In those instances you have to have a
    blue light, badge and a gun! It is amazing the curses that will come out of a little old lady's
    mouth when she is delayed going to the store.

    They must hire paid police officers for
    > any type of traffic control. I am former resident of Massachusetts and promoted road races in New
    > England. I now live in Pennsylvania and have noticed a big difference regarding traffic control in
    > each state.
    >

    It always amazes me how the police in different states work. I have been involved with race
    promotion in about 20 different states, and have had everything from free police to state troopers
    we paid $62 per hour for. Luckily most areas have some type of reserve forces they can draw on. In
    many cases it is possible to get a combination of paid and unpaid officers if you play your cards
    right. But the bottom line is that it is worth it to pay.

    I think my interest in this thread has a lot to do with the fact that I was actually right next to
    the kid who got killed in Ashville a few years ago. I know it is one of the reasons I became a motor
    official a couple of years later. We need more of them out there and if anyone is interested look
    into taking a local official's course.

    Cheers, Chuck
     
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