How to improve for 10-mile TT



Shades

New Member
Jan 13, 2006
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hi,

im 36 and ( describe myself as intermediate level cyclist) and want to improve my 10-mile time trial. I've tried a few and my best time was 26.50. I cycle 3-4 times per week, usually long, steady rides avergaing 17mph. When the weather picks up I do more hilly/faster tempo rides to add a little pop to my legs.
I have recently bought a basic turbo trainer and occasionally use a heart rate monitor. I've a feel for my "Zones". It's a long story but i get ectopic heart beats and so i can't always trust my HR monitor.

Im basically wondering how to train over the winter to improve my time. I've done a little reading and am familiar with the term interval training, though i've not yet tried adding any to my cycling. I was thinking of trying 2x5 mins, increasing to 5x5mins ; or maybe 2x20 mins, increasing to 3x20 mins cycling at threshold/max sustainable heart rate.. Any thoughts?


Thanks
 
What kind of course is it? Hilly or reasonably flat? Here's my amateur take.

If you have a relatively flat course then I would train hard tempo with some sprint intervals slightly over the length of the TT so you have some 'reserves' to push it up during the event.

if it's hilly I would think that sprint intervals on hills would be your best bet coupled with some tempo distance.

17MPH over 10 miles seems pretty good to me...are you using a TT bike or just 'runnin whatcha brung'?
 
Basically, it's a 3-step process:

1. Build your engine

2. Refine the position

3. Get the right equipment

1,2,3 are sort of connected. But if you think of it as a process, that is the evolution I would recommend.

Work on 2x20 minute intervals. Rest as much as you like between intervals. I usually like 5 minutes, but to start with you might need 10 minutes or even 20 minutes of just spinning.

Your 20 minute intervals should be done at 95% of your FTP. FTP varies but it is generally somewhere around 95% of your max for a 20 minute interval. So if you do a 100% effort over 20 minutes, take your average heart rate, multiply by .95, then multiply that by .95. That will be your target heart rate for your 20 minute intervals. I would start with two of these sessions per week. I like to 'block' them, but you can space them out. Then see if you can move up to three 2x20's per week with about a month to go before your event.

As you approach TT season, you want to do some 'above threshold' VO2 max work. I like to start about 6 weeks out from my target event. There are many ways to do these intervals. Some suggest 1 minute on, 1 minute off. Or 2,3,4,5 minutes. I like 5 minutes. I try to do them at 115% of FTP. If I am blocking my 2x20's, I like to mix the V02 work into the first day of the block.

The reason for doing VO2 is to both increase your FTP and prepare you for the inevitability of going above threshold in your event: wind, hills, and corners (i.e. acceleration back up to peak speed) can all bring you above threshold.

Getting the right position is hard to explain over the internet; you're best to see a professional bike fitter.

With equipment, the first thing to invest in are some aerobars. Then buy a TT helmet. These two things will save a lot more time than a hugely expensive TT wheelset.

Good luck with it.
 
Google T-Max intervals.

In 3 months they helped my average speed go up 4mph on my local 10m loop.
 
I was hoping someone could answer what may be a stupid question, but here goes. I've been riding for about two months, 2-3 times a week, 7-14 miles ata time. I'm still not used to the saddle! Any advice?

Thanks,
Chuppy :confused:
 
not used to the saddle meaning it hurts your ass when your riding? can't get comfortable on it?...if you didn't get fitted the first place I would go is a bike shop and have them fit it to you...its alot easier to let them fit it to you than for you to mess around with positions for another month until you get it right...if thats not the case then look into some better riding shorts...
 
I was fitted for the bike 2 years ago. I asked other riders and they said the person who fitted me probly didn't know what they were doing.I appreciate your input.

Thanks,
Chuppy
tiggere said:
not used to the saddle meaning it hurts your ass when your riding? can't get comfortable on it?...if you didn't get fitted the first place I would go is a bike shop and have them fit it to you...its alot easier to let them fit it to you than for you to mess around with positions for another month until you get it right...if thats not the case then look into some better riding shorts...