how to install a bicycle parking rack at home



E

Eric Bragas

Guest
Hi everybody,

I am moving to unit without a garage. (Gasp!) I know I can buy a
storage shed to house my three bicycles, but it seems like overkill
considering a simple bicycle parking rack, like those found in front
of most stores, may be considerably less expensive and less of an
eyesore. Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can anybody
tell me anything about my idea? I'm in San Jose, in case anybody has
an idea of whom to call for such a service.

Thanks,
Eric
 
B

Brian Huntley

Guest
On Feb 21, 2:31 pm, "Eric Bragas" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Hi everybody,
>
> I am moving to unit without a garage. (Gasp!) I know I can buy a
> storage shed to house my three bicycles, but it seems like overkill
> considering a simple bicycle parking rack, like those found in front
> of most stores, may be considerably less expensive and less of an
> eyesore. Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
> Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
> installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can anybody
> tell me anything about my idea? I'm in San Jose, in case anybody has
> an idea of whom to call for such a service.


I can't help you with Condo Authorities or San Jose or such, but I put
a rail made of "black mallable iron" pipe and elbows in my front year,
along the inside of my hedge, to act as a bike rack. It's set in
concrete (buried) and I painted it with Rustoleum. It's very
unobtrusive, although it typically has three bikes and a wagon locked
to it.
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
Eric Bragas wrote:
:: Hi everybody,
::
:: I am moving to unit without a garage. (Gasp!) I know I can buy a
:: storage shed to house my three bicycles, but it seems like overkill
:: considering a simple bicycle parking rack, like those found in front
:: of most stores, may be considerably less expensive and less of an
:: eyesore. Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
:: Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
:: installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can
:: anybody tell me anything about my idea? I'm in San Jose, in case
:: anybody has an idea of whom to call for such a service.

Mount them on the wall or ceiling inside your unit.
 
K

Kristian M Zoerhoff

Guest
On 2007-02-21, Eric Bragas <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
> Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
> installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can anybody
> tell me anything about my idea?


If it's a condo, your chances of being allowed to do anything to the
outside of the unit are slim. Check with the condo board before you
bother calling around for the rack.

--

__o Kristian Zoerhoff
_'\(,_ [email protected]
(_)/ (_)
 
E

Eric Bragas

Guest
On Feb 21, 12:04 pm, "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Eric Bragas wrote:
>
> :: Hi everybody,
> ::
> :: I am moving to unit without a garage. (Gasp!) I know I can buy a
> :: storage shed to house my three bicycles, but it seems like overkill
> :: considering a simple bicycle parking rack, like those found in front
> :: of most stores, may be considerably less expensive and less of an
> :: eyesore. Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
> :: Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
> :: installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can
> :: anybody tell me anything about my idea? I'm in San Jose, in case
> :: anybody has an idea of whom to call for such a service.
>
> Mount them on the wall or ceiling inside your unit.


Three bicycles inside a condo? That's definitely the easier solution,
but takes up too much living space. I've already eliminated this
option.
 
E

Eric Bragas

Guest
On Feb 21, 12:02 pm, "Brian Huntley" <[email protected]>
wrote:
> On Feb 21, 2:31 pm, "Eric Bragas" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > Hi everybody,

>
> > I am moving to unit without a garage. (Gasp!) I know I can buy a
> > storage shed to house my three bicycles, but it seems like overkill
> > considering a simple bicycle parking rack, like those found in front
> > of most stores, may be considerably less expensive and less of an
> > eyesore. Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
> > Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
> > installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can anybody
> > tell me anything about my idea? I'm in San Jose, in case anybody has
> > an idea of whom to call for such a service.

>
> I can't help you with Condo Authorities or San Jose or such, but I put
> a rail made of "black mallable iron" pipe and elbows in my front year,
> along the inside of my hedge, to act as a bike rack. It's set in
> concrete (buried) and I painted it with Rustoleum. It's very
> unobtrusive, although it typically has three bikes and a wagon locked
> to it.


Thanks, Brian, but I think I'm going to go with a rack bolted to the
concrete instead. I would want it to be a selling point when the time
comes later down the road, so I don't think I'll go with anything home-
made, although your solution sounds like an effective one.
 
E

Eric Bragas

Guest
On Feb 21, 12:24 pm, Kristian M Zoerhoff <[email protected]>
wrote:
> On 2007-02-21, Eric Bragas <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
> > Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
> > installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can anybody
> > tell me anything about my idea?

>
> If it's a condo, your chances of being allowed to do anything to the
> outside of the unit are slim. Check with the condo board before you
> bother calling around for the rack.
>
> --
>
> __o Kristian Zoerhoff
> _'\(,_ [email protected]
> (_)/ (_)


Thanks, Kristian, I realize this is a big IF. The concrete slab in
question is the one in the fenced backyard; it's not a communal area.
This is the first time I'll be living in a condo, so I'm taking your
advice to heart. I know not to assume liberties in this situation.
 
K

Kristian M Zoerhoff

Guest
On 2007-02-21, Eric Bragas <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Feb 21, 12:24 pm, Kristian M Zoerhoff <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> On 2007-02-21, Eric Bragas <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> > Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
>> > Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
>> > installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can anybody
>> > tell me anything about my idea?

>>
>> If it's a condo, your chances of being allowed to do anything to the
>> outside of the unit are slim. Check with the condo board before you
>> bother calling around for the rack.
>>

> Thanks, Kristian, I realize this is a big IF. The concrete slab in
> question is the one in the fenced backyard; it's not a communal area.
> This is the first time I'll be living in a condo, so I'm taking your
> advice to heart. I know not to assume liberties in this situation.


Ah, that's probably more to your advantage. You could probably install
the rack yourself, if that's the case. Just need a big drill & masonry
bit, and just bolt the rack down. Sounds like a good excuse to hit the
hardware store, in any event :)

--

__o Kristian Zoerhoff
_'\(,_ [email protected]
(_)/ (_)
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
Eric Bragas wrote:
:: On Feb 21, 12:04 pm, "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:
::: Eric Bragas wrote:
:::
::::: Hi everybody,
:::::
::::: I am moving to unit without a garage. (Gasp!) I know I can buy a
::::: storage shed to house my three bicycles, but it seems like
::::: overkill considering a simple bicycle parking rack, like those
::::: found in front of most stores, may be considerably less expensive
::::: and less of an eyesore. Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure
::::: I need to get the Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't
::::: know much about installing anything, so I'll likely hire a
::::: contractor, but can anybody tell me anything about my idea? I'm
::::: in San Jose, in case anybody has an idea of whom to call for such
::::: a service.
:::
::: Mount them on the wall or ceiling inside your unit.
::
:: Three bicycles inside a condo? That's definitely the easier
:: solution, but takes up too much living space. I've already
:: eliminated this option.

Interesting. It also depends on where you put them. They don't have to all
be in the same place. Hung from the ceiling in various locations could
allow the use of "dead" space and greater security.

Just some ideas.
 
D

dgk

Guest
On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 16:39:59 -0500, "Roger Zoul"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Eric Bragas wrote:
>:: On Feb 21, 12:04 pm, "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:
>::: Eric Bragas wrote:
>:::
>::::: Hi everybody,
>:::::
>::::: I am moving to unit without a garage. (Gasp!) I know I can buy a
>::::: storage shed to house my three bicycles, but it seems like
>::::: overkill considering a simple bicycle parking rack, like those
>::::: found in front of most stores, may be considerably less expensive
>::::: and less of an eyesore. Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure
>::::: I need to get the Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't
>::::: know much about installing anything, so I'll likely hire a
>::::: contractor, but can anybody tell me anything about my idea? I'm
>::::: in San Jose, in case anybody has an idea of whom to call for such
>::::: a service.
>:::
>::: Mount them on the wall or ceiling inside your unit.
>::
>:: Three bicycles inside a condo? That's definitely the easier
>:: solution, but takes up too much living space. I've already
>:: eliminated this option.
>
>Interesting. It also depends on where you put them. They don't have to all
>be in the same place. Hung from the ceiling in various locations could
>allow the use of "dead" space and greater security.
>
>Just some ideas.
>


Besides making a fine conversation piece.
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On 21 Feb 2007 11:31:41 -0800, "Eric Bragas" <[email protected]>
may have said:

>Hi everybody,
>
>I am moving to unit without a garage. (Gasp!) I know I can buy a
>storage shed to house my three bicycles, but it seems like overkill
>considering a simple bicycle parking rack, like those found in front
>of most stores, may be considerably less expensive and less of an
>eyesore. Can anybody advise me on this? I'm sure I need to get the
>Condo Authorities permission first, and I don't know much about
>installing anything, so I'll likely hire a contractor, but can anybody
>tell me anything about my idea? I'm in San Jose, in case anybody has
>an idea of whom to call for such a service.


If you aren't in a complex with a really effective security system,
keep the bikes inside the unit or be prepared to lose them. No
lock-up rack will protect a bike from being stolen if the thief has
ready access to it and wants the bike.

There are several indoor bike storage rack systems made for apartment
and condo dwellers; which one is right for you will depend on what you
have for priorities in feature selection.


--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On 21 Feb 2007 12:31:20 -0800, "Eric Bragas" <[email protected]>
may have said:

>On Feb 21, 12:04 pm, "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Mount them on the wall or ceiling inside your unit.

>
>Three bicycles inside a condo? That's definitely the easier solution,
>but takes up too much living space. I've already eliminated this
>option.


Consider also the effects of weather on the bikes. Will they be worth
riding when you need them, if they aren't stored in a shelter of some
sort?

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Werehatrack <[email protected]> writes:
> On 21 Feb 2007 12:31:20 -0800, "Eric Bragas" <[email protected]>
> may have said:
>
>>On Feb 21, 12:04 pm, "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> Mount them on the wall or ceiling inside your unit.

>>
>>Three bicycles inside a condo? That's definitely the easier solution,
>>but takes up too much living space. I've already eliminated this
>>option.

>
> Consider also the effects of weather on the bikes.


He's in San Jose. San Jose doen't have weather.
Just earthquakes & sunshine. Almost the next
best thing to Sandy Eggo.


> Will they be worth
> riding when you need them, if they aren't stored in a shelter of some
> sort?


If they're still there, unstolen & unvandalized,
I'd expect they would be.

Climate Change might make an issue of outdoor bike storage
down there in Paradise. As you know, the West Coast has
already been battered by some pretty hefty storms lately.

Bikes, like good huntin' dogs, like to enjoy some indoor
comfort, with the rest of their pack.

To the Original Poster (hi Eric <smile, wave>) I'd say
get rid of the sofa, to make room for the stuff that
matters more to you. People that can't/won't tolerate
sitting on hard-ass'd kitchen chairs aren't worth the
trouble of trying to please anyways.

Cohabitate with your beloved bikes!
Love them and protect them, and they'll give so much
back to you, if you let 'em.

Don't let greedy hands despoil them. 'Cuz that's what
will happen if you leave them outside.

Hell, while you're sleeping at night, there's probably
people coming by and poking around in your garbage can,
looking for deposit bottles, and any copper or aluminum
to ultimately sell to China via a metal recycling joint,
so they can get a $5 rock or gak to eke them through
another dreadful night.

In other words, if you want to keep your bikes,
you've gotta keep them indoors, by hook or by crook.
Sometimes even that isn't enough. I'm sorry to break
the bad news to ya, but that's how it is.

In the old days (60's/70's/early 80's) the West Coast
had the best hashish thing going. Then certain influences
kyboshed all that, stuck the West Coast with crappy coke &
derivatives and other ****, and snookered our happy
cannabinoids to points east & south (the filthy swine.)
So we on the West Coast are now stuck with a bunch of
thieving addicts who want the exportable metals on your
bike to trade with scrap dealers, to keep from feeling
deathly sick & desperate.

If the West Coast had the good ol' hash trade back, it
would solve a lot of social misery. 'Cuz folks on hash
don't wanna break into cars, or steal bikes, or even
get up out of their chairs. They just wanna kick back
and dig some (Sid Barett) Pink Floyd or Led Zep or Yes
or Ras Michael And The Sons And Daughters Of Nemus or
John Mayall or Jethro Tull or Jimi Hendrix or that guy
whom I suspect is the illegitimate son of Peter O'Toole
(David Bowie) or even some Bob Dyldo.

But, no. Things is as they is, and there ain't
no two ways about it.

Outdoor bikes are targets. Defend them. Desarados
are out to get 'em.


cheers,
Tom

--
Nothing is safe from me.
Above address is just a spam midden.
I'm really at: tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
Tom Keats wrote:
:: In article <[email protected]>,
:: Werehatrack <[email protected]> writes:
::: On 21 Feb 2007 12:31:20 -0800, "Eric Bragas" <[email protected]>
::: may have said:
:::
:::: On Feb 21, 12:04 pm, "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:
::::: Mount them on the wall or ceiling inside your unit.
::::
:::: Three bicycles inside a condo? That's definitely the easier
:::: solution, but takes up too much living space. I've already
:::: eliminated this option.
:::
::: Consider also the effects of weather on the bikes.
::
:: He's in San Jose. San Jose doen't have weather.
:: Just earthquakes & sunshine. Almost the next
:: best thing to Sandy Eggo.
::
::
::: Will they be worth
::: riding when you need them, if they aren't stored in a shelter of
::: some sort?
::
:: If they're still there, unstolen & unvandalized,
:: I'd expect they would be.
::
:: Climate Change might make an issue of outdoor bike storage
:: down there in Paradise. As you know, the West Coast has
:: already been battered by some pretty hefty storms lately.
::
:: Bikes, like good huntin' dogs, like to enjoy some indoor
:: comfort, with the rest of their pack.
::
:: To the Original Poster (hi Eric <smile, wave>) I'd say
:: get rid of the sofa, to make room for the stuff that
:: matters more to you. People that can't/won't tolerate
:: sitting on hard-ass'd kitchen chairs aren't worth the
:: trouble of trying to please anyways.
::
:: Cohabitate with your beloved bikes!
:: Love them and protect them, and they'll give so much
:: back to you, if you let 'em.
::
:: Don't let greedy hands despoil them. 'Cuz that's what
:: will happen if you leave them outside.
::
:: Hell, while you're sleeping at night, there's probably
:: people coming by and poking around in your garbage can,
:: looking for deposit bottles, and any copper or aluminum
:: to ultimately sell to China via a metal recycling joint,
:: so they can get a $5 rock or gak to eke them through
:: another dreadful night.
::
:: In other words, if you want to keep your bikes,
:: you've gotta keep them indoors, by hook or by crook.
:: Sometimes even that isn't enough. I'm sorry to break
:: the bad news to ya, but that's how it is.
::
:: In the old days (60's/70's/early 80's) the West Coast
:: had the best hashish thing going. Then certain influences
:: kyboshed all that, stuck the West Coast with crappy coke &
:: derivatives and other ****, and snookered our happy
:: cannabinoids to points east & south (the filthy swine.)
:: So we on the West Coast are now stuck with a bunch of
:: thieving addicts who want the exportable metals on your
:: bike to trade with scrap dealers, to keep from feeling
:: deathly sick & desperate.
::
:: If the West Coast had the good ol' hash trade back, it
:: would solve a lot of social misery. 'Cuz folks on hash
:: don't wanna break into cars, or steal bikes, or even
:: get up out of their chairs. They just wanna kick back
:: and dig some (Sid Barett) Pink Floyd or Led Zep or Yes
:: or Ras Michael And The Sons And Daughters Of Nemus or
:: John Mayall or Jethro Tull or Jimi Hendrix or that guy
:: whom I suspect is the illegitimate son of Peter O'Toole
:: (David Bowie) or even some Bob Dyldo.
::
:: But, no. Things is as they is, and there ain't
:: no two ways about it.
::
:: Outdoor bikes are targets. Defend them. Desarados
:: are out to get 'em.
::

Wow....I'm not sure if you're kiddin or not.
 
N

nash

Guest
Outdoor bikes are targets. Defend them. Desarados
are out to get 'em.

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

That is so true and they are very brazen as well.
I live in a 80 suite condo complex, first floor, I forgot to
turn on the outside light one night and they stole my Trek
and broke down a locked gate. I did not lock the Trek all
the time because I locked the gate.
No one heard them or bothered to say anything.
It was on its last legs after riding the hell out of it everyday for 5 years
anyway so they might have used it for the metal I guess.
 
A

Andrew Price

Guest
On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 22:12:22 -0600, Werehatrack
<[email protected]> wrote:

[---]

>There are several indoor bike storage rack systems made for apartment
>and condo dwellers; which one is right for you will depend on what you
>have for priorities in feature selection.


I'd also be interested in learning a bit more about those - do you
happen to have a URL for any of them?
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Thu, 22 Feb 2007 09:51:32 -0500, "Roger Zoul"
<[email protected]> may have said:

>Tom Keats wrote:
>:: Cohabitate with your beloved bikes!
>:: Love them and protect them, and they'll give so much
>:: back to you, if you let 'em.
>::
>:: Don't let greedy hands despoil them. 'Cuz that's what
>:: will happen if you leave them outside.
>::
>:: Hell, while you're sleeping at night, there's probably
>:: people coming by and poking around in your garbage can,
>:: looking for deposit bottles, and any copper or aluminum
>:: to ultimately sell to China via a metal recycling joint,
>:: so they can get a $5 rock or gak to eke them through
>:: another dreadful night.
>::
>:: In other words, if you want to keep your bikes,
>:: you've gotta keep them indoors, by hook or by crook.
>:: Sometimes even that isn't enough. I'm sorry to break
>:: the bad news to ya, but that's how it is.
>::
>:: In the old days (60's/70's/early 80's) the West Coast
>:: had the best hashish thing going. Then certain influences
>:: kyboshed all that, stuck the West Coast with crappy coke &
>:: derivatives and other ****, and snookered our happy
>:: cannabinoids to points east & south (the filthy swine.)
>:: So we on the West Coast are now stuck with a bunch of
>:: thieving addicts who want the exportable metals on your
>:: bike to trade with scrap dealers, to keep from feeling
>:: deathly sick & desperate.
>::
>:: If the West Coast had the good ol' hash trade back, it
>:: would solve a lot of social misery. 'Cuz folks on hash
>:: don't wanna break into cars, or steal bikes, or even
>:: get up out of their chairs. They just wanna kick back
>:: and dig some (Sid Barett) Pink Floyd or Led Zep or Yes
>:: or Ras Michael And The Sons And Daughters Of Nemus or
>:: John Mayall or Jethro Tull or Jimi Hendrix or that guy
>:: whom I suspect is the illegitimate son of Peter O'Toole
>:: (David Bowie) or even some Bob Dyldo.
>::
>:: But, no. Things is as they is, and there ain't
>:: no two ways about it.
>::
>:: Outdoor bikes are targets. Defend them. Desarados
>:: are out to get 'em.
>::
>
>Wow....I'm not sure if you're kiddin or not.


I think he's only slightly over the top there; the core message
(indoor storage is the only reliable option) is accurate, though there
may be a bit of hyperbole in the societal commentary. I doubt that
he's kidding, though I have to observe that I knew more than a few
potheads back in the '70s whose propensity for sociopathic behavior
was every bit as problematic as many of the meth and crack heads of
the present day. Every abuser's reaction is different; it's foolish
to assume that your neighbor is harmless because he just smokes lots
of homegrown dope rather than snorting nose candy.

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
E

Eric Bragas

Guest
OK, people, I was asking for advice on how to install a bicyle parking
rack at home. I'm a Californian, I remember the 70's and the "non-
violent" offenders--I saw plenty of violence by doped up drunks as a
kid, by the way--and I lived in the bike rip-off capital of the
state. I know how to lock my bikes up, you don't have to tell me how
much I love them! I haven't avoided getting ripped off for this long
by being naive. However, the wife and kids like the furniture and
clean living space, so it's either going to be an outdoor parking rack
or an entire lockable shed. "Inclement weather" here comes in the
form of occasional showers, and that's all. I intend to throw a tarp
over them if I don't opt for the shed.

Thanks for all the advice, but has anybody actually installed a
parking rack? Seems like only one person has actual experience with
this.
 
E

Eric Bragas

Guest
I lock my bikes together, through wheels and frames, even when they're
indoors.
 
C

Curtis L. Russell

Guest
On 22 Feb 2007 12:04:57 -0800, "Eric Bragas" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Thanks for all the advice, but has anybody actually installed a
>parking rack? Seems like only one person has actual experience with
>this.


Yes, but not at a house. None of them would seem to apply to your
situation. In two cases we used relatively modern designs with
additional stand alone units that attached at the bottom bracket or
anything approaching a bottom bracket. Since we put all of them into
fresh concrete, it isn't exactly the same. The third case was not much
better in design than a toaster rack, and they almost put it too close
to the building to use it at all. As it was, the drop off in front of
the rack made for some difficult times for the users.

I just took my Bike Friday up to my office...

One problem we had using a commercial rack is that a lot of the
contacts, other than toaster rack styles, wanted to talk to someone
representing sales of at least ten or so, better yet, a municipality
buying a lot more. One rack didn't get a lot of return phone calls
from some of the firms. We got ours from a business that distributed
outdoor benches and such.

Curtis L. Russell
Odenton, MD (USA)
Just someone on two wheels...