How to lubricate the freewheel?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by ChrisW, Mar 18, 2003.

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  1. ChrisW

    ChrisW New Member

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    If I put my bike in for a service, the freewheel ratchet is almost silent when I get it back. I've never worked out how to achieve this myself, as there is no obvious lubrication point for the freewheel. The only option seems to be to squirt oil between the sprockets, but this is more messy than effective.

    Can anyone enlighten me? (The freewheels in question are on various Shimano sets.)

    Chris
     
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  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    ChrisW wrote:
    > If I put my bike in for a service, the freewheel ratchet is almost silent when I get it back. I've
    > never worked out how to achieve this myself, as there is no obvious lubrication point for the
    > freewheel. The only option seems to be to squirt oil between the sprockets, but this is more messy
    > than effective.
    >
    > Can anyone enlighten me? (The freewheels in question are on various Shimano sets.)

    For most hubs, you have to take them apart to get at the freewheel mechanism. For cassette hubs,
    see: http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQindex.shtml#drivetrain

    Whoever does yours must be putting loads of grease in there - which is not a very sensible thing to
    do, imo. I worry about my freewheels when they get quiet; can mean they're getting gunked up. A loud
    freewheel is a healthy freewheel!

    ~PB
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In a brief moment of lucidity ChrisW scribbled:

    > If I put my bike in for a service, the freewheel ratchet is almost silent when I get it back. I've
    > never worked out how to achieve this myself, as there is no obvious lubrication point for the
    > freewheel. The only option seems to be to squirt oil between the sprockets, but this is more messy
    > than effective.
    >
    > Can anyone enlighten me? (The freewheels in question are on various Shimano sets.)
    >
    > Chris

    Personally, I reckon if you can hear the freewheel you know it's working corectly. If it's too quiet
    to hear it's likely to be too full of grease, oil or cack and isn't (generally) working correctly.

    Basically you have to strip the freewheel down to lubricate it properly, and there are a number of
    different types, that can be dis-assembled / re-assembled differently.

    --

    My house is FOR SALE ... http://tinyurl.com/69r0
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In a brief moment of lucidity Pete Biggs scribbled:

    > ChrisW wrote:
    >> If I put my bike in for a service, the freewheel ratchet is almost silent when I get it back.
    >> I've never worked out how to achieve this myself, as there is no obvious lubrication point for
    >> the freewheel. The only option seems to be to squirt oil between the sprockets, but this is more
    >> messy than effective.
    >>
    >> Can anyone enlighten me? (The freewheels in question are on various Shimano sets.)
    >
    > For most hubs, you have to take them apart to get at the freewheel mechanism. For cassette hubs,
    > see: http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQindex.shtml#drivetrain
    >
    > Whoever does yours must be putting loads of grease in there - which is not a very sensible thing
    > to do, imo. I worry about my freewheels when they get quiet; can mean they're getting gunked up. A
    > loud freewheel is a healthy freewheel!
    >
    > ~PB

    Sorry, Pete, didn't mean to almost make a verbatim copy of what you posted .. Your reply wasn't on
    my server when I read the OP .. ;)

    --

    My house is FOR SALE ... http://tinyurl.com/69r0
     
  5. Msa

    Msa Guest

    news:[email protected]...
    > In a brief moment of lucidity ChrisW scribbled:
    >
    > > If I put my bike in for a service, the freewheel ratchet is almost silent when I get it back.
    > > I've never worked out how to achieve this myself, as there is no obvious lubrication point for
    > > the freewheel. The only option seems to be to squirt oil between the sprockets, but this is more
    > > messy than effective.
    > >
    > > Can anyone enlighten me? (The freewheels in question are on various Shimano sets.)
    > >
    > > Chris
    >
    > Personally, I reckon if you can hear the freewheel you know it's working corectly. If it's too
    > quiet to hear it's likely to be too full of grease, oil or cack and isn't (generally) working
    > correctly.
    >
    > Basically you have to strip the freewheel down to lubricate it properly, and there are a number of
    > different types, that can be dis-assembled / re-assembled differently.
    >
    > --

    > My house is FOR SALE ... http://tinyurl.com/69r0
    >
    >

    When I first grease my freewheel it's quiet. Within a few miles the click-click is back again. As
    Pete says...healthy!

    Solution to stop the noise completely.....Don't stop pedalling ya slack bitch! :)

    --
    Mark
    ______________________________________

    "Just ask yourself: What would Scooby Doo?"
     
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