How to make my cheap bike faster...cheaply



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E

Ed Brenton

Guest
I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
purpose thus far.

I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.

I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
working on making myself faster)

I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200 (on
sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.

I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.

Thanks, El Cheap-O Ed
 
B

B A R R Y B U R

Guest
On 28 Jan 2004 13:48:42 -0800, [email protected] (Ed Brenton) wrote:

> I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.

Low-end seatposts, cranks and stems are often quite heavy.

Barry
 
A

Andy Birko

Guest
Profile Fast Forward Seatpost. This will allow you to rotate your position and achieve a smaller
frontal area and flatter back.

"Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> purpose thus far.
>
> I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
>
> I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> working on making myself faster)
>
> I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
> (on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
>
> I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
> positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.
>
> Thanks, El Cheap-O Ed
 
B

Bruce Frech

Guest
Wheels are the next best thing, after the aero bars.

So check out all wheels in your price range and choose the most aero ones.

Bruce

"Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> purpose thus far.
>
> I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
>
> I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> working on making myself faster)
>
> I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
> (on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
>
> I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
> positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.
>
> Thanks, El Cheap-O Ed
 
P

Paul Kopit

Guest
On 28 Jan 2004 13:48:42 -0800, [email protected] (Ed Brenton) wrote:

>I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
>(on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
>
>I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
>positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.

Save the $200 and just work on yourself. Minimize body weight and do interval training. Chase riders
that are faster than you for as long as you can stand it.

A pound of weight on the bicycle makes little difference in how fast you'll go. Prove it to
yourself. Ride a time trial with 2 large, full water bottles and the same trial with the minimum of
water you need.
 
B

Brian Watson

Guest
Ed, I am no expert on this, but I am a big believer in starting "cheap" and working up as *required*
- not as fashion dictates! My take on this is that you have a functional bike that is doing the job.
If you feel that it is letting you down in some way, try to figure out how it is letting you down
and improve that.

I know this does not answer your question, but hopefully gives some food for thought.

Good luck,

Brian

"Andy Birko" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Profile Fast Forward Seatpost. This will allow you to rotate your
position
> and achieve a smaller frontal area and flatter back.
>
>
> "Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> > purpose thus far.
> >
> > I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
> >
> > I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> > working on making myself faster)
> >
> > I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
> > (on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
> >
> > I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty
> > good positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.
> >
> > Thanks, El Cheap-O Ed
 
P

Phil Holman

Guest
"Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> purpose thus far.
>
> I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
>
> I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> working on making myself faster)
>
> I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
> (on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
>
> I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
> positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.

I believe you can still get a wheel cover that will turn your rear wheel into a disc for around $50.
I estimated a gain of 1mph for myself some while back.

Phil Holman
 
J

Jeff

Guest
"Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> purpose thus far.
>
> I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
>
> I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> working on making myself faster)
>

Re-build your hubs with 25 grade chromium steel balls. Keep your chain clean and lubed. Shave
your legs?

-JJ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ "It's all about ball bearings"
- Rick Wilcox, Canyon Cycles, Kittredge, CO.
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsk

Guest
> I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
> (on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
>
> I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
> positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.

Absolute #1 bang for the buck, in terms of performance, are tires. If you're riding on the stock
tires (or anything like them) and upgrade to a high-quality tire like a Conti GP3000 or Michelin
Axial Pro, I'd be very surprised if you couldn't notice a big difference. And the difference won't
be as much speed from greater efficiency as it will be from the bike simply feeling more lively
and smooth.

As for wheels, reviews tend to miss one of the most important considerations- long-term durability.
We're talking not just resistance to damage, but how easy it is to get and replace spokes, bearings
& cassette mechanisms. Things people don't tend to think about when they buy new wheels, and
discover later on that the wheels aren't nearly as practical as they'd hoped.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

"Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> purpose thus far.
>
> I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
>
> I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> working on making myself faster)
>
> I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
> (on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
>
> I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
> positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.
>
> Thanks, El Cheap-O Ed
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
Ed Brenton wrote:

> I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> purpose thus far.
>
> I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
>
> I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> working on making myself faster)
>
> I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
> (on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
>
> I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
> positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.

You'd get a better value from :

Buy "The Bicycle Wheel", a spoke wrench, hub adjusting wrenches, a set of new bearings and grease.

Rebuild the cleaned hubs with fresh grease, new bearings and a proper adjustment.

Detension your wheels, lubricate the nipples and retrue them yourself. You get an immediate benefit
in that they will be tight, round and straight. You get a much more valuable benefit in knowing they
are right (you can ride them harder with greater confidence) and you'll gain durability and
dependability.

And you'd still be money ahead if you indulged in a pair of zippy event-only tires that you slip on
the night before your race.

There's nothing about your wheels that the other wheels improve. If you do get the 'sale' wheels,
you would do well to prep them in the same manner anyway.
--
Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> purpose thus far.
>
> I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
>
> I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> working on making myself faster)
>
> I'm looking at getting Performance Titan wheels which are lighter, more aero, are less than $200
> (on sale), and they got good reviews. Would wheels be a good place to start as far as upgrades.
>
> I've gone clipless from the start, slapped some aero-bars on there, and think I've got pretty good
> positioning. I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.

This subject has been beaten to death in the past. In summary, there are 2 camps: those who believe
wheels, frames, etc. will make you faster, and those who don't. Science seems to support the latter,
advertising the former.
 
Q

Qui Si Parla Ca

Guest
Get a good bike fit from a fit person that maximizes your position for what you want to do...that is
be as fast as possible on the bike, then be the best shape you can to start the run...

Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote
> "Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote
> >
> > I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> > working on making myself faster)
> >
>
> Re-build your hubs with 25 grade chromium steel balls.

Rebuilding hubs won't make a bike faster.

> "It's all about ball bearings"
> - Rick Wilcox, Canyon Cycles, Kittredge, CO.

It isn't, really.
 
R

Richard Chan

Guest
> Ed Brenton wrote:
>
> > I have a Trek 1000 (2001) all stock. Yes it is LOWWWW end everything, but it has served it's
> > purpose thus far.
> >
> > I race recreationaly in non-drafting races, sprint triathlons mostly.
> >
> > I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
> > working on making myself faster)...

Work on your riding position for pedalling and aero efficiency. Move your saddle around to find the
effective zone (with respect to the BB). It will be very uncomfortable to be aero - grin and bear
it. Next best thing, pump more air into your tires.
 
H

Harris

Guest
B a r r y B u r k e J r . <[email protected]> wrote:
> On 28 Jan 2004 13:48:42 -0800, [email protected] (Ed Brenton) wrote:

> > I'm now looking for the most bang for the buck on an upgrade.

> Low-end seatposts, cranks and stems are often quite heavy.

For steady pace time trialing, the amount of weight saved on these items isn't going to make much
difference.

I think he's already made the most important changes: Clipless pedals and aero bars.

Art Harris
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 01:16:51 GMT, "Phil Holman"
<[email protected]> may have said:

>I believe you can still get a wheel cover that will turn your rear wheel into a disc for around
>$50. I estimated a gain of 1mph for myself some while back.

Beware of crosswinds...

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
it's also possible that I'm busy.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
J

John Everett

Guest
On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 13:38:11 GMT, "Peter Cole"
<[email protected]ast.net> wrote:

>"Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote
>> "Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote
>> >
>> > I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
>> > working on making myself faster)
>> >
>>
>> Re-build your hubs with 25 grade chromium steel balls.
>
>Rebuilding hubs won't make a bike faster.

And besides, most hubs come with Grade 25 balls.

jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Peter Cole wrote:

> This subject has been beaten to death in the past. In summary, there are 2 camps: those who
> believe wheels, frames, etc. will make you faster, and those who don't. Science seems to support
> the latter, advertising the former.

In addition, most race sanctioning organizations create rules than attempt to minimize performance
differences due to equipment.

Tom Sherman - Quad Cities
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Peter Cole wrote:

> "Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote
>
>>"Ed Brenton" <[email protected]> wrote
>>
>>>I want to make my bike faster, but not spend more than I spent on the actual bike. (Yes, I am
>>>working on making myself faster)
>>>
>>
>>Re-build your hubs with 25 grade chromium steel balls.
>
>
> Rebuilding hubs won't make a bike faster.

Yes and no. If the bearings were in really bad shape, rebuilding or replacing the hub would make a
significant difference.

Tom Sherman - Quad Cities
 
J

Jp

Guest
"Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s51>...

> This subject has been beaten to death in the past. In summary, there are 2 camps: those who
> believe wheels, frames, etc. will make you faster, and those who don't. Science seems to support
> the latter, advertising the former.

Actually, science proves that there are measurable improvements in the performance of equipment, and
is able to quantify the theoretical effect on the outcome of a time trial.

The two camps are those who think that small differences don't count because "you would improve more
by losing a pound" and those who think that it is possible that the cumlative effect of small
improvements in equipment could be significant in some events.

JP
 
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