How To Mark Seatpost?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by James Messick, Jun 22, 2003.

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  1. I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark it at the max height (for
    me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one that's good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike.
    How's the best way to do this? File? Marker? Ruler? (That's out, then I'd have to remember at least
    one number!) TIA

    James
     
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  2. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark it at the max height (for
    > me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one that's good for off-road, as this is a
    > mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker? Ruler? (That's out, then I'd have to
    > remember at least one number!) TIA

    I wrap a piece of tape around mine, marking the lowest setting, then it's easy to eyeball the
    maximum setting, an inch or so below. Instead of lowering your seatpost for transport, you could
    just pull it out.
     
  3. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark
    it
    > at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    that's
    > good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker? Ruler?
    > (That's out, then I'd have to remember at least one number!) TIA
    >
    > James
    >
    >

    Try a paint pencil.

    http://crafts.fiskars.com/projects/show_product.html?prod=2715-7097

    Mike
     
  4. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark it at the max height (for
    >me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one that's good for off-road, as this is a
    >mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker? Ruler? (That's out, then I'd have to
    >remember at least one number!) TIA

    Mine's anodized black. Within not too long a time, it just sort of lost it's sheen where it was
    clamped so it became self-marking. Before that, I accidentally put a very fine scratch in it - which
    coincidentally became handy as a reference point..
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  5. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark
    it
    > at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    that's
    > good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker? Ruler?
    > (That's out, then I'd have to remember at least one number!) TIA
    >
    > James

    If you take a sharp punch, you can mark it all the way at the back right where it enters the
    seatpost. Just a tiny little dimple. If you want to make it more obvious, you can fill it in with a
    tiny bit of white paint. Presto, instant, obvious marker, that won't interfere or rub off when you
    drop the post in the frame.

    Jon Bond
     
  6. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark
    > it
    > > at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    > that's
    > > good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker?
    > > Ruler? (That's out, then I'd have to remember at
    least
    > > one number!) TIA
    > >
    > > James
    >
    > If you take a sharp punch, you can mark it all the way at the back right where it enters the
    > seatpost.

    ER, seat tube. you know what I mean.

    > Just a tiny little dimple. If you want to make it more obvious, you can fill it in with a tiny bit
    > of white paint. Presto, instant, obvious marker, that won't interfere or rub off when you drop the
    > post in the frame.
    >
    > Jon Bond
     
  7. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark
    it
    > at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    that's
    > good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker? Ruler?
    > (That's out, then I'd have to remember at least one number!)

    My own bike gets loaned all to often and so it has a vey small centerpunch dot that falls just at
    the top of the slot when it's right for me. My post is a classic hefty thick-walled model and the
    centerpunch dot is about 0.3mm deep. YMMV

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  8. > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark
    it
    > at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    that's
    > good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker? Ruler?
    > (That's out, then I'd have to remember at least one number!) TIA

    James: I use a piece of duct tape that's stuck underneath the saddle, and write down the distance
    from the center of the bottom bracket to the base of the seat rails. That's something easily
    repeatable *and* independent of seatpost used (plus, you've got some duct tape handy for
    emergencies, like securing a tire boot in place).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  9. On Sun, 22 Jun 2003 22:29:06 GMT, "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark it at the max height (for
    >me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one that's good for off-road, as this is a
    >mountain-bike.

    Most of my posts have numbers printed or etched on them. If you're going to use several "settings",
    it might make sense to pick up a seat post that has measurements etched or painted on.

    Barry
     
  10. Bobqzzi

    Bobqzzi Guest

    On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 03:56:17 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark
    >it
    >> at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    >that's
    >> good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker?
    >> Ruler? (That's out, then I'd have to remember at least one number!) TIA
    >
    >James: I use a piece of duct tape that's stuck underneath the saddle, and write down the distance
    >from the center of the bottom bracket to the base of the seat rails. That's something easily
    >repeatable *and* independent of seatpost used (plus, you've got some duct tape handy for
    >emergencies, like securing a tire boot in place).
    >
    >--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >

    Yes, but what about the extra weight of the duct tape? Surely it must slow you down significantly,
    especially when compared to scribing a line which actually removes material, and therefore weight.
    Think man, think!
     
  11. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    James Messick <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark
    it
    > at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    that's
    > good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker? Ruler?
    > (That's out, then I'd have to remember at least one number!) TIA
    >
    > James

    I used a hacksaw. Remember to be careful not to cut all the way through your seat post (which is an
    apparently common mishap), or it may well become unusable. HTH.

    Shaun aRe
     
  12. "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > James Messick <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to mark
    > it
    > > at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    > that's
    > > good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to do this? File? Marker?
    > > Ruler? (That's out, then I'd have to remember at
    least
    > > one number!) TIA
    > >
    > > James
    >
    > I used a hacksaw. Remember to be careful not to cut all the way through
    your
    > seat post (which is an apparently common mishap), or it may well become unusable. HTH.
    >
    >
    >
    > Shaun aRe
    >
    >

    That sounds like a good idea, just scoring it every inch or so. Thanks to everyone for the
    good ideas.

    James
     
  13. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > That sounds like a good idea, just scoring it every inch or so. Thanks to everyone for the
    > good ideas.
    >
    > James
    >

    If I could interject here, I wouldn't go scoring your seatpost frankly. It is a structural part and
    is subject to cyclical stresses that could induce fatigue failure in a scored post. I would go more
    the route of a permanent marker or paint pen as others have suggested. I use a permanent marker and
    touch it up when it starts to fade. IMHO, it's a better option.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  14. Tsheer

    Tsheer Guest

    "James Messick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > James Messick <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I routinely have to lower my seatpost during transport. I'd like to
    mark
    > > it
    > > > at the max height (for me) and maybe at a lower level when I find one
    > > that's
    > > > good for off-road, as this is a mountain-bike. How's the best way to
    do
    > > > this? File? Marker? Ruler? (That's out, then I'd have to remember at
    > least
    > > > one number!) TIA
    > > >
    > > > James
    > >
    > > I used a hacksaw. Remember to be careful not to cut all the way through
    > your
    > > seat post (which is an apparently common mishap), or it may well become unusable. HTH.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    > >
    > >
    >
    > That sounds like a good idea, just scoring it every inch or so. Thanks to everyone for the
    > good ideas.
    >
    > James
    >
    I use a paint pen, which you can get at art supply stores. It's like a felt-tip marker that
    dispenses paint. You can get a color that contrasts with your post, and it's very durable.
    Hopefully you folks are joking about the hacksaw.
     
  15. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

  16. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > "Remember to be careful not to cut all the way through your seat post (which is an apparently
    > common mishap), or it may well become unusable. HTH."
    >
    >
    > Hmmm, what do you think? ',;~}~
    >
    >
    >
    > Shaun aRe
    >

    You know, I had this image of someone hacking away at their post..thought I'd better inject some
    sanity in there just in case someone read that and thought "Well, that sounds like a great idea!"
    You just never know!

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  17. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    S. Anderson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]...
    > "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >
    > > "Remember to be careful not to cut all the way through your seat post (which is an apparently
    > > common mishap), or it may well become unusable. HTH."
    > >
    > >
    > > Hmmm, what do you think? ',;~}~
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Shaun aRe
    > >
    >
    > You know, I had this image of someone hacking away at their post..thought I'd better inject some
    > sanity in there just in case someone read that and thought "Well, that sounds like a great idea!"
    > You just never know!
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Scott..

    Heheheheh - I did actually use a piece of broken h/s blade to mark mine, but I just scratched it
    with the blade then rubbed crud into the scratch - it's safe, but then again, I was my chains in a
    jar full of petrol and haven't blown myself up yet (it seems it's a stupid thing to do for everybody
    else - YMMV and all that stuff).

    Shaun aRe - Experience is a good teacher, common sense is a good safety officer.
     
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