How to Plan a long ride?



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D

Dale S.

Guest
Hi,

I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could guide
me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could recommend? :)

Thanks.

-D
 
J

Jobst Brandt

Guest
Dale S. writes furtively:

> I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
> planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could guide
> me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could recommend? :)

I don't think you'll get far looking for a tour using only bicycle paths but the best way to plan a
long tour is to take shorter ones. There are are many features best learned by practice and personal
preference that will become apparent as you ride. You'll also learn what you need and are willing to
carry on your trip as you extend your range.

Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
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David Storm

Guest
The following touring websites might be helpful:

http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/touring/ http://www.tomswenson.com/ http://www.raph.nl/

"Dale S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Hi,
>
> I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
> planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could guide
> me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could recommend? :)
>
> Thanks.
>
> -D
 
D

Dennis P. Harri

Guest
On 20 Feb 2003 10:14:09 -0800 in rec.bicycles.rides, [email protected] (Dale S.) wrote:

> I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
> planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could guide
> me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could recommend? :)
>
for maps, try www.adventurecycling.com

some states have bike-specific maps

check larger bookstores, or those the specialize in sports or travel books, for bicycle touring
guides. do google searches for "bicycle touring guide". check the league of american bicyclists web
site for links to local bike clubs that have web sites --- www.bikeleague.org

about preparation: for a fit cyclist, figure on averaging about 60 miles per day, and allow yourself
at least one day per week for resting --- your muscles need to recuperate.

remember to gear down and spin up. you can ride all day at 90-95 rpm if you gear down. your
objective is not to see how fast you can reach your destination, but to reach it every day
if possible.

do some weekend tours, especially on 3 day weekends. do some training rides, 10-20 miles a day at
first, building up to 60 mile days. as you build up your touring stamina, start riding with panniers
and increase the pannier loads until you reach your touring weight.
 
E

Ed

Guest
[email protected] (Dale S.) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> Hi,
>
> I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
> planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could guide
> me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could recommend? :)
>
> Thanks.
>
> -D

I am in the process of planning a ride from Springfield MA to NYC in the Spring. I plan to use both
rail trails and back roads. If interested I can foward my cue sheets. also checkout NYC
tansportation alternatives site for bridge crossings in NYC

Ed
 
K

Karen M.

Guest
Dale wrote:

> I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
> planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could guide
> me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could recommend? :)

It would be difficult to find a road that specifically prohibits bicycles, other than in
interstate (and few of us prefer to ride on those). In NJ you can ride on interstates with a
permit, but why would you want to? Get a set of state highway maps, lay them out on the floor,
and figure out a general trajectory. How long do you have for the trip, and how many miles per
day would you like to ride? What time of year--will T-storms or leaf-peeper traffic jams be a
factor? Adjust the route. Will you be camping, hostelling, or motelling? Adjust for overnights.
Pick up a guidebook or two, and see if there's anything interesting or really cool that you
shouldn't miss. (For me, in Joisey it would be SoL State Park, and Cape May.) Adjust the route.
Are there small town festivals during that time frame that you'd like to take in, or avoid?
Adjust the route. You could also contact bike clubs nearby, and bounce your plan off them.
Someone local will tell you about the marvelous scenery and low-trafficked route just a couple
miles away from your initial choice, and someone else will steer you away from a potholed canine
gauntlet that won't take you where you want to go. (Last year a touring cyclist posted a query to
our Michigan mail list. We routed him through metro Detroit on a fast 'n' easy highway service
drive, and argued about the Intersection From Hell which I live near and an advocate had never
seen.) Hint: roads paralleling an interstate are often the best for cycling. HTH --Karen M.
 
J

Juniatabiker

Guest
[email protected] (Dale S.) wrote in message
> Hi,
>
> I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
> planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could guide
> me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could recommend? :)
>
> Thanks.
>
> -D

I agree with Karen. Good state highway maps have enabled me to plan most of my trips. Even better
are the DeLorme atlas's, but unfortunately most of the states you'll be passing through are not
covered by DeLorme (unless they have new ones out that I don't know about). I also second the idea
of using roads that parallel interstates. Oft times these were the original highways which means
they are fairly direct, but now most of the traffic is on the interstate.

Once you have a proposed route, posting it here usually brings some helpful responses although be
prepared to get conflicting advice. Good routes, like beauty, are in the eye of the beholder.

Don't be so fast to ignore interstates (although most states prohibit their use - New Jersey being
an exception). The wide, paved berms often make for safer riding in my opinion than some back roads
where lack of berm forces you into the driving lanes with the dumptrucks, etc. Of course,
interstates do tend to be boring.

You obviously need to think about where you'll cross the Hudson. Since I don't know where you're
going in Jersey, I really can't make much comment about that. When going east, I usually use the
George Washington Bridge into Manhatten.

HTH Ed B
 
J

Janet Cicariell

Guest
JuniataBiker wrote:

> <snip>
>
> Don't be so fast to ignore interstates (although most states prohibit their use - New Jersey being
> an exception). The wide, paved berms often make for safer riding in my opinion than some back
> roads where lack of berm forces you into the driving lanes with the dumptrucks, etc. Of course,
> interstates do tend to be boring.
>

New Jersey allows bicycles on *some* parts of the interstates with a permit. These are in the
western and southern extremes of the state. The area close to NYC you cannot ride on interstates.
There are lots of places with virtually no shoulder, "permanent" under construction, etc.

Janet
 
L

Lawrence Fieman

Guest
<snip> "Dale S." <[email protected]> wrote > I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey
sometime in the next
> year. How would I go about planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any
> websites

Adventure Cycling http://www.adv-cycling.org/ sells their maps of bicycle friendly long distance
cycling routes. They are reputable.

Regards, Larry
 
L

Larry Fitzpatri

Guest
Juniata,

It great to hear you are planning a bike touring trip, believe me it's the greatest. My children and
I have toured the western US and recently Mexico as well as some weekenders.

My experience as told me you can spend as much or as little a time planning as you want. It usually
turns out a lot different than you ever dreamed... The main thing is allow enough time to enjoy
yourself and get to were you are going in time. Between 50 and 60 miles per day is plenty if you are
hauling all your stuff including camping gear.

Less traveled roads are more enjoyable, but most of them time they don't go a very direct route. New
England is full of small villages and the maze of roads and freeways has to a bicyclist dream. Don't
spend all your time studying maps and planning overnights, road construction, traffic and just plain
worn out roads can make changing your route at an intersection a good idea. Instead think of the
places you want to ride though and have lots of them in mind, it's great when a detour takes you by
something you didn't think you would get to see.

Allow enough days to get there, allow for a rest day or two, get your bike in good shape, don't take
much with you, ride south and I bet you have a great trip.

Wish I was going,

Larry Fitzpatrick "JuniataBiker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> [email protected] (Dale S.) wrote in message
> > Hi,
> >
> > I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
> > planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could
> > guide me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could
> > recommend? :)
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > -D
>
> I agree with Karen. Good state highway maps have enabled me to plan most of my trips. Even better
> are the DeLorme atlas's, but unfortunately most of the states you'll be passing through are not
> covered by DeLorme (unless they have new ones out that I don't know about). I also second the idea
> of using roads that parallel interstates. Oft times these were the original highways which means
> they are fairly direct, but now most of the traffic is on the interstate.
>
> Once you have a proposed route, posting it here usually brings some helpful responses although be
> prepared to get conflicting advice. Good routes, like beauty, are in the eye of the beholder.
>
> Don't be so fast to ignore interstates (although most states prohibit their use - New Jersey being
> an exception). The wide, paved berms often make for safer riding in my opinion than some back
> roads where lack of berm forces you into the driving lanes with the dumptrucks, etc. Of course,
> interstates do tend to be boring.
>
> You obviously need to think about where you'll cross the Hudson. Since I don't know where you're
> going in Jersey, I really can't make much comment about that. When going east, I usually use the
> George Washington Bridge into Manhatten.
>
> HTH Ed B
 
D

Daniel Finton

Guest
For routes down through NY State, try http://www.roberts-1.com/bikehudson/. He's a local rider who
has a lot of Hudson Valley routes on his website.

"ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> [email protected] (Dale S.) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > Hi,
> >
> > I was hoping to bike from Vermont to New Jersey sometime in the next year. How would I go about
> > planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there any websites that could
> > guide me? Any books you could recommend, or better yet, any specific routes you could
> > recommend? :)
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > -D
>
> I am in the process of planning a ride from Springfield MA to NYC in the Spring. I plan to use
> both rail trails and back roads. If interested I can foward my cue sheets. also checkout NYC
> tansportation alternatives site for bridge crossings in NYC
>
> Ed
 
R

Ron Wallenfang

Guest
Adventure Cycling's east cost route goes from Bar Harbor ME to Norristown PA he southern part of
that route (from Windsor Locks, CT might be helpful if you're starting in VT.

Don't get married to a route before you start. There can be surprises. I've changes routes a number
of times on my long trips, most often because of unsafe riding conditions (narrow 2 lane roads with
lots of traffic and no paved shoulder), but also because of detours or to take advantage of tail
winds, or to find needed facilities. "Lawrence Fieman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> <snip> "Dale S." <[email protected]> wrote > I was hoping to bike from Vermont
to
> New Jersey sometime in the next
> > year. How would I go about planning this trip to only use roads that allow bicycles? Are there
> > any websites
>
>
> Adventure Cycling http://www.adv-cycling.org/ sells their maps of
bicycle
> friendly long distance cycling routes. They are reputable.
>
> Regards, Larry
 
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