how to prevent fishtailing ?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Clarou, Jan 31, 2006.

  1. Clarou

    Clarou Guest

    I had a friend watch me swim tonight, her only remark was : "You're
    fishtailing ! That's very graceful, but very inefficient !"
    She didn't offer much help to correct this : she thought it was
    probably a problem of lack of core body strength, but I don't feel
    particularily weak, maybe I just don't know how to use this strength in
    the pool. So do you have any idea on how to correct this ?
     
    Tags:


  2. Martin Smith

    Martin Smith Guest

    Clarou wrote:

    > I had a friend watch me swim tonight, her only remark was : "You're
    > fishtailing ! That's very graceful, but very inefficient !"
    > She didn't offer much help to correct this : she thought it was
    > probably a problem of lack of core body strength, but I don't feel
    > particularily weak, maybe I just don't know how to use this strength in
    > the pool. So do you have any idea on how to correct this ?
    >


    Someimes it is caused by pulling across the center line.
     
  3. diablo

    diablo Guest

    "Martin Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Clarou wrote:
    >
    >> I had a friend watch me swim tonight, her only remark was : "You're
    >> fishtailing ! That's very graceful, but very inefficient !"
    >> She didn't offer much help to correct this : she thought it was
    >> probably a problem of lack of core body strength, but I don't feel
    >> particularily weak, maybe I just don't know how to use this strength in
    >> the pool. So do you have any idea on how to correct this ?
    >>

    >
    > Someimes it is caused by pulling across the center line.


    ....and strengthen up your kick.
     
  4. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    Clarou wrote:
    > I had a friend watch me swim tonight, her only remark was : "You're
    > fishtailing ! That's very graceful, but very inefficient !"
    > She didn't offer much help to correct this : she thought it was
    > probably a problem of lack of core body strength, but I don't feel
    > particularily weak, maybe I just don't know how to use this strength in
    > the pool. So do you have any idea on how to correct this ?
    >

    I have a related problem, but only when I breathe. I tend to fishtail
    toward the breathing side. I supposed this could be solved with better
    body roll.
    Madelaine
     
  5. The most consistent "cure" for so-called Fishtailing is to think "the
    hips lead the stroke." Everytime I bring this up, some people object,
    but it's a very simple thing to try and, in my experience with giving
    this advice over the past 15 years, it works almost all of the time.

    What causes fishtailing is writhing back and forth with the upper
    torso, while the hips/pelvis/butt/thighs are dragged passively behind.
    Most novice swimmers can't kick (Diablo's suggestion), but almost
    everyone will stop fishtailing if the hips are made the center of
    attention. Begin each and every stroke by driving the opposite hip to
    the extended hand downward. Move up and down the pool driving each
    stroke with the hips. Your fishtailing should instantly be a thing of
    the past.
     
  6. Clarou

    Clarou Guest

    Thank you everybody for your suggestions, I will think of this in the
    pool next time, and I'll try to report on what happens. The problem is
    that I don't know how to check if I'm fishtailing or not, so I'll will
    have to wait until I can have someone watch me swim again, and it could
    be a long time.
     
  7. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    [email protected] (Larry Weisenthal) wrote:
    > The most consistent "cure" for so-called Fishtailing is to think "the
    > hips lead the stroke." Everytime I bring this up, some people object,
    > but it's a very simple thing to try and, in my experience with giving
    > this advice over the past 15 years, it works almost all of the time.
    >
    > What causes fishtailing is writhing back and forth with the upper
    > torso, while the hips/pelvis/butt/thighs are dragged passively behind.
    > Most novice swimmers can't kick (Diablo's suggestion), but almost
    > everyone will stop fishtailing if the hips are made the center of
    > attention. Begin each and every stroke by driving the opposite hip to
    > the extended hand downward. Move up and down the pool driving each
    > stroke with the hips. Your fishtailing should instantly be a thing of
    > the past.
    >


    Hmmm, it seems I am trying to breathe with my non-arthritic hip.
    Instead of rolling to breathe, I seem to be kind of making myself into a
    "C." My kick is OK, but I could see if a strong downbeat will stop the
    c-ing.
    Madelaine
     
  8. Clarou wrote:
    > I had a friend watch me swim tonight, her only remark was : "You're
    > fishtailing ! That's very graceful, but very inefficient !"
    > She didn't offer much help to correct this : she thought it was
    > probably a problem of lack of core body strength, but I don't feel
    > particularily weak, maybe I just don't know how to use this strength in
    > the pool. So do you have any idea on how to correct this ?


    Allow me to take the contrarian point of view. I doubt fishtailing has
    much affect on speed. Given how humans present to the water: head,
    blocked off shoulders, arms pinwheeling .. it's a mess. It's hard for
    me to believe that gentle side to side undulation of the rest of the
    body is really a big deal. Also, I'm always amazed at some of the
    overhead shots of elite swimmers. I wouldn't say they are fishtailing,
    but they often kick well outside their body line. I'm speaking of
    elites who have broken kicking rhythms. I mean side ways kicks of huge
    amplitude. So the notion of travelling down a narrow tube as we swim
    is probably imagery reserved for swimmers who use 6-beat kicks and can
    thus cancel all the many torques which get created during freestyle.
    But if you don't kick much, your body IS going to undulate.

    Eric
     
  9. Pat in TX

    Pat in TX Guest


    >
    > Allow me to take the contrarian point of view. I doubt fishtailing has
    > much affect on speed. Given how humans present to the water: head,
    > blocked off shoulders, arms pinwheeling .. it's a mess. It's hard for
    > me to believe that gentle side to side undulation of the rest of the
    > body is really a big deal. Also, I'm always amazed at some of the
    > overhead shots of elite swimmers. I wouldn't say they are fishtailing,
    > but they often kick well outside their body line. I'm speaking of
    > elites who have broken kicking rhythms. I mean side ways kicks of huge
    > amplitude. So the notion of travelling down a narrow tube as we swim
    > is probably imagery reserved for swimmers who use 6-beat kicks and can
    > thus cancel all the many torques which get created during freestyle.
    > But if you don't kick much, your body IS going to undulate.
    >
    > Eric


    I try not to present a "blocked off shoulders" effect when swimming the
    front crawl. I put one arm forward and the other back so that the shoulders
    are not square to the direction in which I am traveling. In order to do
    that, I have to roll a bit. I try to minimize the "blocked off shoulders"
    effect whenever I can.

    Pat in TX
    >
     
Loading...
Loading...