How to remove FSA SLK Mega-Exo Crank?



W

Wayne Pein

Guest
I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?

Thanks,
Wayne
 
On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 21:49:54 GMT, Wayne Pein <[email protected]> wrote:

>I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
>two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
>appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
>them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
>the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
>brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?


If there's not a pinch bolt in the end of the crank, your left arm
should be self-extracting when the reaining bolt is unscrewed. If you
have removed the retaining bolt, put it back, and then reinstall the
threaded collar that covers the outer diameter of it, and use the
appropriate size of Allen wrench to unscrew the bolt again. As you do
so, the crank will be pushed off by the retaining bolt. If you
buggered the collar by prying it out, it may be that you're screwed
until you can get a replacement, but it won't hurt to try a regular
crank puller and see it it will thread into the recess.

If there's a pinch bolt in the end of the crank, this must be
unscrewed (I'm not sure if it has to be removed completely) as well as
removing the retaining bolt. The pinch-bolt type of crank is mostly
used on road bikes. With the retaining bolt and pinch bolt removed,
the arm should come right off.



--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
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On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 22:54:07 GMT, Werehatrack
<[email protected]> wrote:

>On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 21:49:54 GMT, Wayne Pein <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
>>two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
>>appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
>>them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
>>the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
>>brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?

>
>If there's not a pinch bolt in the end of the crank, your left arm
>should be self-extracting when the reaining bolt is unscrewed. If you
>have removed the retaining bolt, put it back, and then reinstall the
>threaded collar that covers the outer diameter of it, and use the
>appropriate size of Allen wrench to unscrew the bolt again. As you do
>so, the crank will be pushed off by the retaining bolt. If you
>buggered the collar by prying it out, it may be that you're screwed
>until you can get a replacement, but it won't hurt to try a regular
>crank puller and see it it will thread into the recess.
>
>If there's a pinch bolt in the end of the crank, this must be
>unscrewed (I'm not sure if it has to be removed completely) as well as
>removing the retaining bolt. The pinch-bolt type of crank is mostly
>used on road bikes. With the retaining bolt and pinch bolt removed,
>the arm should come right off.


Actually, on the pinch-bolt type of arm, there may be two pinch bolts.
Both of them have to be slacked off and/or removed if so.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
No - you're doing it right. 2x4 and a hammer. Should work every time.
 
Andrew F Martin wrote:
> No - you're doing it right. 2x4 and a hammer. Should work every
> time.


That's wrong on so many levels. The obvious tool for this crank removal is
the adjustable wrench.
--
Phil, Squid-in-Training
 
Wayne Pein wrote:
> I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
> two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
> appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
> them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
> the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
> brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?
>
> Thanks,
> Wayne


Speaking from what I heard/read on the internet only. Doesn't FSA use
the ISIS connection on the non-drive crank arm? Assuming the crank
bolt is not self extracting, shouldn't you use a crank arm removal tool
to pull it off just like a normal crank arm.
 
Werehatrack wrote:

>On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 21:49:54 GMT, Wayne Pein <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
>>I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
>>two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
>>appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
>>them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
>>the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
>>brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?
>>
>>

>
>If there's not a pinch bolt in the end of the crank, your left arm
>should be self-extracting when the reaining bolt is unscrewed. If you
>have removed the retaining bolt, put it back, and then reinstall the
>threaded collar that covers the outer diameter of it, and use the
>appropriate size of Allen wrench to unscrew the bolt again. As you do
>so, the crank will be pushed off by the retaining bolt. If you
>buggered the collar by prying it out, it may be that you're screwed
>until you can get a replacement, but it won't hurt to try a regular
>crank puller and see it it will thread into the recess.
>
>
>
>

No pinch bolt, so self-extracting as you describe.

Thanks,
Wayne
 
Andrew F Martin wrote:
> No - you're doing it right. 2x4 and a hammer. Should work every time.


Rice and beans went out of my nose.


josh
 
On 2 Feb 2006 16:13:37 -0800, "Andrew F Martin"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Arkansas micrometer? Yeah, that'll work too.


Naw, he needs a crowbar. Hook the fork under the crank next to the
shaft, brace the crook on the seat tube, and heave up.

[this advice *not* intended for actual use]
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
Wayne Pein wrote:
> I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
> two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
> appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
> them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
> the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
> brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?


Yea, stop and go to a shop.

-Nate
 
Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
> Andrew F Martin wrote:
> > No - you're doing it right. 2x4 and a hammer. Should work every
> > time.

>
> That's wrong on so many levels. The obvious tool for this crank removal is
> the adjustable wrench.
> --
> Phil, Squid-in-Training


An adjustable is too specialized. That's why I ride a round with a
Vise-Grip clamped to my seatpost.

Joseph
 
[email protected] wrote:
> Wayne Pein wrote:
> > I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
> > two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
> > appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
> > them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
> > the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
> > brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Wayne

>
> Speaking from what I heard/read on the internet only. Doesn't FSA use
> the ISIS connection on the non-drive crank arm? Assuming the crank
> bolt is not self extracting, shouldn't you use a crank arm removal tool
> to pull it off just like a normal crank arm.


I belive this is true. I have ordered one and it is expected anyday. If
this isn't resolved, I'll post a description of the unmounted pieces.

Joseph
 
Wayne Pein wrote:
> I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
> two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
> appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
> them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
> the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
> brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?
>
> Thanks,
> Wayne


Little stub that goes into the BB spindle then a normal crank puller.
 
[email protected] wrote:
> Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
> > Andrew F Martin wrote:
> > > No - you're doing it right. 2x4 and a hammer. Should work every
> > > time.

> >
> > That's wrong on so many levels. The obvious tool for this crank removal is
> > the adjustable wrench.
> > --
> > Phil, Squid-in-Training

>
> An adjustable is too specialized. That's why I ride a round with a
> Vise-Grip clamped to my seatpost.
>
> Joseph



The obvious answer is, get a bigger hammer. something in the 10lb range
should take that sucker clean off. like butta.


josh
 
Hi Wayne,
I'm with Full Speed Ahead.

Tip #1 - Contact FSA. We can provide tech support by phone from our
Seattle offices (or from FSA Europe in Milan).

Tip #2 - The dust cover you describe is meant to be left in place. Put
your 8mm allen wrench into the retaining bolt (through the hole in the
dust cover). Loosen. As the retaining bolt unscrews, it will collide
with the dust cover. Further loosening will free the arm from the
spindle. You won't find much torque is required.

Since you've loosened the dust cover, best to eventually make it very
tight. A Park SPA-2 (red pin wrench), for example, works.

Please contact us for any further advice: 1-877-743-3372 (USA).

Cheers,
Ric

Wayne Pein wrote:
> I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
> two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
> appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
> them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
> the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
> brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?
>
> Thanks,
> Wayne
 
Ric wrote:

> Hi Wayne,
> I'm with Full Speed Ahead.
>
> Tip #1 - Contact FSA. We can provide tech support by phone from our
> Seattle offices (or from FSA Europe in Milan).
>
> Tip #2 - The dust cover you describe is meant to be left in place. Put
> your 8mm allen wrench into the retaining bolt (through the hole in the
> dust cover). Loosen. As the retaining bolt unscrews, it will collide
> with the dust cover. Further loosening will free the arm from the
> spindle. You won't find much torque is required.
>
> Since you've loosened the dust cover, best to eventually make it very
> tight. A Park SPA-2 (red pin wrench), for example, works.
>
> Please contact us for any further advice: 1-877-743-3372 (USA).
>
> Cheers,
> Ric
>


Thanks Ric. I maintain and have completely disassembled and built 6
bikes, including our tandem, but had never encountered a self-extracting
bolt as all our bikes previously used square taper spindles.

Usually, 2x4s, hammers, bolt cutters, and pipe wrenches are sufficient.
If they fail I use a chain saw or a 4x6.

Wayne
 
Gentleman, I nominate the crank extraction thread for
Post of the Month. And thank you.

In article
<[email protected]>,
[email protected] wrote:
> Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
> > Andrew F Martin wrote:

> In article <68vEf.452$%[email protected]>,
> Wayne Pein <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > I removed the dust cap and retaining bolt on the non-drive arm, but the
> > two arms don't come apart. From the downloadable pdf instructions it
> > appears that the two arms are connected with a spline, but I can't get
> > them to release. I wrapped the left arm in a towel and put a 2x4 over
> > the inner surface and whacked it with a hammer but nothing. The bike is
> > brand new, about 150 miles. Any tips?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Wayne


> > > No - you're doing it right. 2x4 and a hammer. Should work every
> > > time.

> >
> > That's wrong on so many levels. The obvious tool for this crank removal is
> > the adjustable wrench.

>
> An adjustable is too specialized. That's why I ride a round with a
> Vise-Grip clamped to my seatpost.


In article <LvMEf.1943$%[email protected]>,
Wayne Pein <[email protected]> wrote:
> Ric wrote:
>
> > Hi Wayne,
> > I'm with Full Speed Ahead.
> >
> > Tip #1 - Contact FSA. We can provide tech support by phone from our
> > Seattle offices (or from FSA Europe in Milan).
> >
> > Tip #2 - The dust cover you describe is meant to be left in place. Put
> > your 8mm allen wrench into the retaining bolt (through the hole in the
> > dust cover). Loosen. As the retaining bolt unscrews, it will collide
> > with the dust cover. Further loosening will free the arm from the
> > spindle. You won't find much torque is required.
> >
> > Since you've loosened the dust cover, best to eventually make it very
> > tight. A Park SPA-2 (red pin wrench), for example, works.
> >
> > Please contact us for any further advice: 1-877-743-3372 (USA).
> >
> > Cheers,
> > Ric
> >

>
> Thanks Ric. I maintain and have completely disassembled and built 6
> bikes, including our tandem, but had never encountered a self-extracting
> bolt as all our bikes previously used square taper spindles.
>
> Usually, 2x4s, hammers, bolt cutters, and pipe wrenches are sufficient.
> If they fail I use a chain saw or a 4x6.


--
Michael Press