How to remove stuck pedal

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by stevecoh1, Sep 24, 2005.

  1. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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    I recently bought a new bike and for the first time use clipless pedals. But this bike is my "show horse". I am keeping my older road bike for commuting, my "work horse". I've always used toe clips on this bike but now I'd like to convert it to clipless pedals. I ordered some, along with the biggest, most expensive pedal wrench Performance sells, and find I can't remove the old pedals. There's no way to get enough force on the pedals to remove them. I tried wd40 and I do know that the left pedal is threaded in reverse but I just can't budge the damned thing.

    Has anyone experienced this and what is the solution?
     
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  2. MTB WVA

    MTB WVA New Member

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    I dont have a "pedal wrench" I just used a 5/8 open end wrench (or at least I think it was a 5/8) But I had the same problem, I tried all day to get the dang pedal off, so I got mad of course. I went and found the biggest hammer we have, put my foot on the pedal to hold it, and WHAM, it came loose. (and no I didnt hit the pedal, I hit the wrench) You might try that if you havent.
     
  3. shannons dad

    shannons dad New Member

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    Yup, I'd agree with that. "If at first you don't succeed, use a bigger hammer!":)
     
  4. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    I use a 15mm combination spanner and a RUBBER hammer.. :D
     
  5. shannons dad

    shannons dad New Member

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    They work well with glass nails, left handed screwdrivers and the occasional long stand........:D
     
  6. huhenio

    huhenio New Member

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    PB blaster or liquid wrench. Apply and happy wrenching
     
  7. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Use the the best fitting wrench possible . Put an extension on it if you have one for leverage ,such as a hollow pipe.
    Use anti seize lubricant on it such as wd-40.
    Now apply heat from a simple propane torch to the crank or the pedal. Since there are two types of metal they will expand at a different rate.
    This will work I have done it many times. Apply the WD - 40, let it sit for a while ,heat and torque the bitch, it will turn.
    By the way make sure youe are turning the threads in the correct dirrection since one side has reverse threads.
    At the moment I can't remember which but I think it is the left side.
     
  8. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    I cannot agree with most of this advice! Heat and brute force on a nice new Carbon Fibre or clear painted polished hollow alloy crank arm is just not on! Consider the damage to a BB from steel hammer blows... :eek:

    Put some grease on the threads before installing the pedals. If its a new bike have the LBS demonstrate that the pedals can be easily removed, its like wheel nuts on a car, they must be user friendly, for girls too.
     
  9. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Unless I misunderstood it is an old bike and the crank is probably not carbon.
    Heat is the solution. You can put grease on it until doomsday if it is seized and it will make no difference.
    Heat and a wrench will do the trick and unless you are a pyromaniac you can use caution and never tell it has had a torch near it.
    Old pedals seize,it happens. Heat it up and it will spin free.
     
  10. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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    Correct, the bike in question is 13 years old and there's no carbon in it. The cranks are aluminum. My NEW bike is carbon but there's no pedal problem there.

    Thanks, I thought heat might be the solution and wanted to see if anyone would recommend it. Assuming a not-too-hot torch, just a cheap torch for heating copper plumbing tubing, for example, how long would you need to heat the crank.
     
  11. toomanybikes

    toomanybikes New Member

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    Last time I had this problem I simply removed the crank arm, put the pedal in a bench vise so the crank arm would spin and belted it a few times with a dead blow hammer. It came loose.
     
  12. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Probably about three minutes or so and adjust the torch to a fine point and only use the very tip of the flame as to direct the heat only whre you need it.
    Should work well, just don't burn yourself with a hot wrench.
     
  13. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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    Seems to me that carefully applied heat would have less chance of seriously damaging (disfiguring, cracking, bending) the crank than whacking it with a hammer would. Plus I don't have a bench vise. And plus I would have to then handle crank removal as well.
     
  14. Asian Allez

    Asian Allez New Member

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    same thing happened to me, LBS took care of it without a problem.
     
  15. Bluey_27

    Bluey_27 New Member

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    I had the same problem. Just put a big pipe over the wrench and get someone else to hold the other crank down with another big pipe. If this doesn't work get a bigger pipe.
    or you could try putting the cranks in the oven.
     
  16. stevecoh1

    stevecoh1 New Member

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    Well, there's good news and there's bad news. The good news is that this method took the left pedal right off. Hooray for heat. The bad news is that heat did no good on the right side All that happened is that the wrench slipped, gradually deforming the hexagonal pedal axle without budging the frigging threads one iota.

    This frigging stupid pedal has made a mockery of Performance's "Professional" pedal wrench and a more ordinary Craftsman model. Both wrenches simply slip over the nut's now rounded hexes. Got a long length of pipe and that just helps the wrench slip over the rounded hexes.

    What now?
     
  17. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Do you wish to reuse the pedal?

    If not you can strip the pedal down to the bare axle and then use a heavy-duty pipe wrench and see if that helps. If held the right way they pinch tighter the more you torque, so it is possible to apply some serious force before they start to slip. With the rest of the pedal out of the way you can even grind new flat faces on the axle to allow a smaller wrench to fit there.
    If you know someone who has an arc welder (stick will do fine) simply slip a big nut over the pedal axle, weld the nut into place(a 30-sec job) and then torque. This will have the added benefit of getting considerable heat into the axle as well. Drilling out the axle and chasing the thread IS possible, but a bitch of a job due to the hardness of the axle.
     
  18. wineandkeyz

    wineandkeyz New Member

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    Pipe wrench or vise grips.

    By the way, don't make the mistake I did when I was trying to replace a balky pedal recently. It wouldn't come loose easily, so I arranged the bike so that the opposite pedal was wedged and couldn't move. I don't have a repair stand, so the bike was resting on the floor with both wheels on the ground. I used a wrench with a piece of pipe as an extender. The pedal finally came loose, but by then I had put so much downward pressure on the back wheel that I needed to take it to the LBS to have it trued. :rolleyes:
     
  19. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    I agree, find a pipe wrench with a narrow enough head to fit and use the heat and a little leverage.
     
  20. MTB WVA

    MTB WVA New Member

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    I think vise grips would be your best bet, it will take a lot of force to get them on tight enough, but it should work.
     
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