How to store bikes?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Doug, May 1, 2003.

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  1. Doug

    Doug Guest

    Hello all

    This must be a familiar story to all of you bike lovers out there.

    As the proud owner of a road bike, 2 MTB's, a tandem, a trailer bike and assorted kids bikes, the
    inside of my garage looks like the aftermath of an explosion. I gave up on the idea of putting a
    car in the garage long ago, but it would be nice to walk from one end to the other without going
    through a tubular assault course and I always have to move at least two bikes before I can get to
    the one I want.

    So short of installing a TARDIS inside my garage, whats the best way to store these bikes so that I
    can get to the one I want and walk across the garage without risking serious injury (I'm not as
    flexible as I used to be).

    I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around the wheels but I'm worried
    that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).

    Hanging them horizontally would only help if I was less then 4 feet tall.

    I could grind them up and put them in a box, but then I wouldn't be able to ride them....

    This must be a common issue and I'd be very interested to hear how people have resolved the
    problem....

    Doug
     
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  2. Doug wrote: <snip>
    > This must be a common issue and I'd be very interested to hear how people have resolved the
    > problem....

    I saw a wall mounted rack in Halford's the other day for about £15, IIRC. Looked like it would take
    2 bikes, and I guess if you can get them high enough it might free up enough space for a car even.
    I'm sure you must be able to buy them elsewhere or even make something similar.

    --
    StainlessSteelRat "Life is divided into the horrible and the miserable." -- Woody Allen
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Doug" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around
    the
    > wheels but I'm worried that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).

    Think about it - how much does your bike weigh, and how much do you weigh? Yes, it will be fine.

    Using some kind of pulley system would possibly be sensible too.

    > This must be a common issue and I'd be very interested to hear how people have resolved the
    > problem....

    we haven't resolved it... (but vertically isn't an option where our bikes stay).

    cheers, clive
     
  4. Bryan

    Bryan New Member

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    Gearshift (www.gearshift.co.uk) sell a stand that you extends from floor to ceiling and you can put a couple of bikes on sells for £35 iirc

    Bryan
     
  5. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], Doug <[email protected]> typed:
    >
    > I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around the wheels but I'm worried
    > that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).
    >

    I hang all mine alternately handlebar up, handlebar down from hooks. The wheels can withstand your
    weight on them so the weight of the bike hanging will be inconseequential.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
  6. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Doug" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hello all
    >
    > This must be a familiar story to all of you bike lovers out there.
    >
    > As the proud owner of a road bike, 2 MTB's, a tandem, a trailer bike and assorted kids bikes, the
    > inside of my garage looks like the aftermath of
    an
    > explosion. I gave up on the idea of putting a car in the garage long
    ago,
    > but it would be nice to walk from one end to the other without going
    through
    > a tubular assault course and I always have to move at least two bikes
    before
    > I can get to the one I want.
    >
    > So short of installing a TARDIS inside my garage, whats the best way to store these bikes so that
    > I can get to the one I want and walk across the garage without risking serious injury (I'm not as
    > flexible as I used to
    be).
    >
    > I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around
    the
    > wheels but I'm worried that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).
    >
    > Hanging them horizontally would only help if I was less then 4 feet tall.
    >
    > I could grind them up and put them in a box, but then I wouldn't be able
    to
    > ride them....
    >
    > This must be a common issue and I'd be very interested to hear how people have resolved the
    > problem....
    >
    >
    >
    > Doug
    >
    >
    It's obvious, Doug.... You need a bigger house, with a bigger garage.... 'course, once you've got
    that sorted, you'll probably be able to fit another couple of bikes in..... ;-) cheers, Dave.
     
  7. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    My bike is stored in the maintence pit in our garage. This allows me to get from one end to
    the other. The bike being so light weight it's not a problem to lift the trap and haul it out.
    Plus there is plenty of room down there to keep the workstand and assorted tools I need to
    work down there.

    Gadget
     
  8. Rg

    Rg Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In news:[email protected], Doug <[email protected]> typed:
    > >
    > > I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around the wheels but I'm
    > > worried that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).
    > >
    >
    > I hang all mine alternately handlebar up, handlebar down from hooks. The wheels can withstand your
    > weight on them so the weight of the bike hanging will be inconseequential.
    >
    > Tony
    >

    This method with hooks on the garage ceiling was the only solution I could come up with for my 10
    machines - no problems with wheels (so far) - logic implies that the engineering principles of
    spokes should make it safe.

    I actually have a slight compromise - 7 machines hang on hooks and the 3 frequently used/best
    machines have a floor stand (holds the wheel) - that way I still have room to get to the
    workbench etc

    ... trouble is if I buy a Brompton I'll have to hide it in the car in case the missus finds out !

    RG
     
  9. Trealaw Boy

    Trealaw Boy Guest

    --------------BD1B00E1E0C9A0206D59D057 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    Take a look at www.tuskstore.com

    The Bike Store may be what you need. It has a decent review in this months Cycling Plus.

    Regards

    TB

    Doug wrote:

    > Hello all
    >
    > This must be a familiar story to all of you bike lovers out there.
    >
    > As the proud owner of a road bike, 2 MTB's, a tandem, a trailer bike and assorted kids bikes, the
    > inside of my garage looks like the aftermath of an explosion. I gave up on the idea of putting a
    > car in the garage long ago, but it would be nice to walk from one end to the other without going
    > through a tubular assault course and I always have to move at least two bikes before I can get to
    > the one I want.
    >
    > So short of installing a TARDIS inside my garage, whats the best way to store these bikes so that
    > I can get to the one I want and walk across the garage without risking serious injury (I'm not as
    > flexible as I used to be).
    >
    > I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around the wheels but I'm worried
    > that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).
    >
    > Hanging them horizontally would only help if I was less then 4 feet tall.
    >
    > I could grind them up and put them in a box, but then I wouldn't be able to ride them....
    >
    > This must be a common issue and I'd be very interested to hear how people have resolved the
    > problem....
    >
    > Doug

    --------------BD1B00E1E0C9A0206D59D057 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    <!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> <html> Take a look at <a
    href="http://www.tuskstore.com">www.tuskstore.com</a>
    <p>The Bike Store may be what you need. It has a decent review in this months Cycling Plus.
    <q>Regards
    <r>TB
    <s>Doug wrote: <blockquote TYPE=CITE>Hello all
    <t>This must be a familiar story to all of you bike lovers out there.
    <u>As the proud owner of a road bike, 2 MTB's, a tandem, a trailer bike and <br>assorted kids bikes,
    the inside of my garage looks like the aftermath of an <br>explosion. I gave up on
    the idea of putting a car in the garage long ago, <br>but it would be nice to walk from one end
    to the other without going through <br>a tubular assault course and I always have to move at
    least two bikes before <br>I can get to the one I want.
    <v>So short of installing a TARDIS inside my garage, whats the best way to <br>store these bikes so
    that I can get to the one I want and walk across the <br>garage without risking serious injury
    (I'm not as flexible as I used to be).
    <w>I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around the <br>wheels but I'm
    worried that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).
    <x>Hanging them horizontally would only help if I was less then 4 feet tall.
    <y>I could grind them up and put them in a box, but then I wouldn't be able to <br>ride them....
    <z>This must be a common issue and I'd be very interested to hear how people <br>have resolved the
    problem....
    <z>Doug</blockquote> </html>

    --------------BD1B00E1E0C9A0206D59D057--
     
  10. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Doug" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around the wheels but I'm worried
    > that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).

    Don't worry, this will not happen. As long as you don't scratch the rim in the physical act of
    putting it on or taking it off the hook you can leave a bike like that indefinitely with absolutely
    no ill effects.

    > This must be a common issue and I'd be very interested to hear how people have resolved the
    > problem....

    With a small number of bicycles the best solution is to hang them on the wall so that they are flat
    against it. Unfortunately you soon run out of useful wall space as I have in my own garage at home.
    I'm about to rearrange things so that each bike hangs by its front wheel from a single hook in the
    wall. The front wheel will be uppermost and the rear wheel will rest on the wall, as though
    Spiderman were riding the bike straight up it. This way you can get many more bikes onto a given
    wall space and still have some room to walk round them.

    A further idea is to have an anchor point fixed into the ground and then secure all the bikes with
    an FO lock and a single cable through the frames.

    --
    Dave...
     
  11. > I gave up on the idea of putting a car in the garage long ago,

    Do you mean you are supposed to put cars in the garage??? Nooooo.... that's what driveways are
    for. Garages are to protect one's most treasured travelling steeds in. B icycles go in garages -
    not cars :)

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  12. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], RG <[email protected]> typed:
    >
    > ... trouble is if I buy a Brompton I'll have to hide it in the car in case the missus finds out !
    >

    Didn't work for me :-(

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
  13. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > In news:[email protected], Doug <[email protected]> typed:
    >>
    >> I thought about hanging them vertically from the roof with hooks around the wheels but I'm
    >> worried that this might pull the wheels out of shape(?).
    >>
    >
    > I hang all mine alternately handlebar up, handlebar down from hooks. The wheels can withstand your
    > weight on them so the weight of the bike hanging will be inconseequential.

    Large plastic covered hooks from the DIY place work well. The rims are solid enough, but it helps to
    deliberately choose a different point after each outing. Btw take care with oil filled forks to
    avoid back seepage.

    My Mum used to have a wooden frame in the kitchen, upon which she used to drape linen for drying or
    airing, and then haul it up to the ceiling on rope and pulleys. Would a version of that work to hold
    a bike on its side above the car? Mike
     
  14. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Trealaw Boy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > The Bike Store may be what you need. It has a decent review in this months Cycling Plus.

    Google may be your friend - try Kestrel Engineering - it came up with a link to numerous bike
    stands. There was also a company at last years bike show at the NEC with a pretty good idea in
    bike storage - unfortunately I can't remember the name:-( second stand on the right when you came
    in the door.

    I have about 90 bikes stored in the outside bike shed - it measures about 20ft square.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.sandymillport.fsnet.co.uk
     
  15. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Thu, 1 May 2003 11:32:37 +0100, "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I hang all mine alternately handlebar up, handlebar down from hooks.

    Whe not have them all right-way-up with the bars at alternate ends?

    Mind you, I built a verandah on the back of my house which, since the house is on a big hill, has
    enough space underneath it for a decent sized bike shed :)

    Mind you, we still have a triplet and the 'bent parked in the kitchen...

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  16. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

  17. In article <k353bv8u73m4c5[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Thu, 1 May 2003 11:32:37 +0100, "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I hang all mine alternately handlebar up, handlebar down from hooks.
    >
    > Whe not have them all right-way-up with the bars at alternate ends?

    Depends on the hooks. If I understand what I think you mean you'd need to alternate wheel hooks
    (like those the CTC sell) with handlebar hooks, like those Tusk do.

    Colin
     
  18. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> typed:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> On Thu, 1 May 2003 11:32:37 +0100, "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I hang all mine alternately handlebar up, handlebar down from hooks.
    >>
    >> Whe not have them all right-way-up with the bars at alternate ends?
    >
    > Depends on the hooks. If I understand what I think you mean you'd need to alternate wheel hooks
    > (like those the CTC sell) with handlebar hooks, like those Tusk do.
    >

    I didn't quite understand either but I hang one bike by the front wheel, the next by the back wheel
    etc - no need for the Tusk hooks I just use the plastic covered ones. The reason for alternating is
    you can space the hooks half a handebar's width apart since adjacent bikes do not have their
    handlebars competing for space. Otherwise you need to have extra space or the handlebars could
    clash. Where I have mine hung the other alternative of saddle towards you/ saddle away from you
    makes getting the bikes down more difficult.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] family.com says...

    > I didn't quite understand either but I hang one bike by the front wheel, the next by the back
    > wheel etc - no need for the Tusk hooks I just use the plastic covered ones. The reason for
    > alternating is you can space the hooks half a handebar's width apart since adjacent bikes do not
    > have their handlebars competing for space. Otherwise you need to have extra space or the
    > handlebars could clash. Where I have mine hung the other alternative of saddle towards you/ saddle
    > away from you makes getting the bikes down more difficult.

    Incidentally, do you use the hooks sold by the CTC, 9.99 each I think, or some others? I need to
    hang four bikes (at present) and so I am looking to keep the costs down.

    Colin
     
  20. In message <[email protected]>, Colin Blackburn
    <[email protected]> writes
    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] family.com says...
    >
    >> I didn't quite understand either but I hang one bike by the front wheel, the next by the back
    >> wheel etc - no need for the Tusk hooks I just use the plastic covered ones. The reason for
    >> alternating is you can space the hooks half a handebar's width apart since adjacent bikes do not
    >> have their handlebars competing for space. Otherwise you need to have extra space or the
    >> handlebars could clash. Where I have mine hung the other alternative of saddle towards you/
    >> saddle away from you makes getting the bikes down more difficult.
    >
    >Incidentally, do you use the hooks sold by the CTC, 9.99 each I think, or some others? I need to
    >hang four bikes (at present) and so I am looking to keep the costs down.
    >
    >Colin

    I use these: http://tinyurl.com/at17

    Available from my local hardware shop, cost a bit more than £2.26 plus VAT but certainly not £9.99
    each. LBS sells same things too.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
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