How to tell if chain is too long?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Boyd Speerschne, Jun 5, 2003.

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  1. Hi,

    The subject says it all. How can I tell if my chain needs a few links removed?

    Thanks in advance,
    - Boyd S.
     
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  2. Ns>

    Ns> Guest

    I believe if I can remember... Have the bike in the large front chainring and the smallest rear
    chainring. The rear derailleur should intersect with the ground i.e. the bottom jockey wheel of the
    rear derailleur should not be in front of the upper jockey wheel. I believe as close to 90 degrees
    as possible...

    My2c,

    NS
     
  3. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    NS> wrote:
    > I believe if I can remember... Have the bike in the large front chainring and the smallest rear
    > chainring. The rear derailleur should intersect with the ground i.e. the bottom jockey wheel of
    > the rear derailleur should not be in front of the upper jockey wheel. I believe as close to 90
    > degrees as possible...
    >
    > My2c,
    >
    > NS>

    Another approach: Break the chain and put it around the big-big combination outside the rear DR. You
    should have about 1 link of overlap (1/2 to 1-1/2) between the chain ends when you pull 'em tight.
    Put the chain back on right. At 1/2 link or so of overlap, make sure that you can shift into the
    big-big combination without damage to the rear DR (shifting from the front or the rear) -- not a
    normal combination, but most of us hit it by accident on occasion -- for me, it's usually while
    night riding.

    If you have a full suspension mountain bike, you need to do the above test with the rear suspension
    at the point where it needs the most chain (fully extended for most, so not a problem).

    Note that by a link, I mean 2 chain pieces :).

    David
     
  4. If it's dragging on the ground, that would be a clue :-3)

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  5. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Thu, 05 Jun 2003 22:54:53 GMT, Boyd Speerschneider <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >The subject says it all. How can I tell if my chain needs a few links removed?

    Put the chain in the small ring and small cog. If the chain drags the bottom of the rear
    derailleur, it is too long. You should be able to put the chain in the big/big combination. If you
    can do the first but not the second, you need a rear derailleur with a longer cage or a smaller big
    ring or low cog.
     
  6. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Paul Kopit wrote:
    > On Thu, 05 Jun 2003 22:54:53 GMT, Boyd Speerschneider <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>The subject says it all. How can I tell if my chain needs a few links removed?
    >
    >
    > Put the chain in the small ring and small cog. If the chain drags the bottom of the rear
    > derailleur, it is too long. You should be able to put the chain in the big/big combination. If you
    > can do the first but not the second, you need a rear derailleur with a longer cage or a smaller
    > big ring or low cog.
    >

    Be wary of this approach. On my mountain bike, it leads to too short a chain and WILL break the rear
    DR shifting into the big-big (I know, not normal, but it does happen :)).

    David
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    >> The subject says it all. How can I tell if my chain needs a few links removed?
    >
    > Put the chain in the small ring and small cog. If the chain drags the bottom of the rear
    > derailleur, it is too long.

    It doesn't matter if it is too long for small-small, IMO. Low gears tend to work best with shorter
    chains. I use chains that are just long enough for the big-big.

    ~PB
     
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