How To Transport A Bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kevan Smith, May 3, 2003.

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  1. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    Yesterday, I took my racing bike to the bike shop for it's yearly maintenance. Before I took it, I
    thought, "You know, it would be funny if I could take a bike on my bike to the bike shop." So I
    strapped the wheels to the rack of my crosstown bike and carried the frame on my shoulder. It
    worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it in a
    couple of days.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Okay ... I'm going home to write the "I HATE
    RUBIK's CUBE HANDBOOK FOR DEAD CAT LOVERS" ...
    3:07:40 AM 3 May 2003
     
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  2. >It worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it in
    >a couple of days.

    Don't know. But I have seen kids here transporting bicycles by holding them alongside by the stem,
    it looked effortless but I suppose some practice is required. An interesting solution.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  3. "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >It worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it
    > >in a couple of days.
    >
    > Don't know. But I have seen kids here transporting bicycles by holding them alongside by the stem,
    > it looked effortless but I suppose some practice is required. An interesting solution.

    I did this when I was a little kid. Don't expect to go very fast; keep it slow and pay double
    attention. definitely NOT the thing to do on a busy arterial.

    (and probably illegal in states which prohibit two-abreast cycling...!)

    -L
     
  4. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >It worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it
    > >in a couple of days.
    >
    > Don't know. But I have seen kids here transporting bicycles by holding them alongside by the stem,
    > it looked effortless but I suppose some practice is required. An interesting solution.

    How about mounting a biketight onto the rear rack of the towing bike? The fork of the towee (?)
    would attach to the bike tight and you could zip-tie the front wheel to the frame. Of course, it
    would look like one bike was getting a bit amorous with the other, but if you don't mind the stares,
    it should work well.

    http://www.biketight.com/

    -Buck
     
  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sat, 03 May 2003 03:08:34 -0500, <[email protected]>, Kevan Smith
    <[email protected]/\/\> wrote:

    >Yesterday, I took my racing bike to the bike shop for it's yearly maintenance. Before I took it, I
    >thought, "You know, it would be funny if I could take a bike on my bike to the bike shop." So I
    >strapped the wheels to the rack of my crosstown bike and carried the frame on my shoulder. It
    >worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it in a
    >couple of days.

    When this came up before, one proposed solution was to lower the saddle all the way, turn the bike
    over and securely lash the flat central portion of the handlebars to the rack of the tow-bike.
    Obviously this won't work if the bike being towed has fenders or a rear rack.
    --
    zk
     
  6. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Sat, 03 May 2003 16:46:20 GMT, "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p
    . c o m> from Road Runner - Texas wrote:

    >"Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> >It worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it
    >> >in a couple of days.
    >>
    >> Don't know. But I have seen kids here transporting bicycles by holding them alongside by the
    >> stem, it looked effortless but I suppose some practice is required. An interesting solution.
    >
    >How about mounting a biketight onto the rear rack of the towing bike? The fork of the towee (?)
    >would attach to the bike tight and you could zip-tie the front wheel to the frame. Of course, it
    >would look like one bike was getting a bit amorous with the other, but if you don't mind the
    >stares, it should work well.
    >
    >http://www.biketight.com/

    That looks good, except I think that would put too much straing on the fork, because the bike would
    be entirley supported by it. However, I bet I could rig somethign with a board extending from the
    rack to at least the rear triangle. Man, this thing will be back heavy!

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace FOOLED you! Absorb EGO SHATTERING impulse
    rays, polyester poltroon!!
    6:41:54 PM 3 May 2003
     
  7. On Sat, 03 May 2003 10:20:57 -0700, Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Sat, 03 May 2003 03:08:34 -0500, <[email protected]>, Kevan Smith
    ><[email protected]/\/\> wrote:
    >
    >>Yesterday, I took my racing bike to the bike shop for it's yearly maintenance. Before I took it, I
    >>thought, "You know, it would be funny if I could take a bike on my bike to the bike shop." So I
    >>strapped the wheels to the rack of my crosstown bike and carried the frame on my shoulder. It
    >>worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it in a
    >>couple of days.
    >
    >When this came up before, one proposed solution was to lower the saddle all the way, turn the bike
    >over and securely lash the flat central portion of the handlebars to the rack of the tow-bike.
    >Obviously this won't work if the bike being towed has fenders or a rear rack.

    FWIW I like this idea. You have one wheel on the ground so you can make turns. Even better would be
    a setup that could have some rotation between the handlebars and the rack.

    NOSPAM is antispam
     
  8. "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message .look.ca...
    >
    > When this came up before, one proposed solution was to lower the saddle all the way, turn the bike
    > over and securely lash the flat central portion of the handlebars to the rack of the tow-bike.

    Well, maybe the poor people do it that way, but here's how the other half live:

    http://www.birdautomotive.com/Bike%20Rack%20Audi%20TT.htm
     
  9. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Kevan Smith" <[email protected]/\/\> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Yesterday, I took my racing bike to the bike shop for it's yearly
    maintenance.
    > Before I took it, I thought, "You know, it would be funny if I could take
    a bike
    > on my bike to the bike shop." So I strapped the wheels to the rack of my crosstown bike and
    > carried the frame on my shoulder. It worked fine, but
    are
    > there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it
    in a
    > couple of days.
    >

    How about strapping (securly!) the front wheel to the side of the rack? The back wheel of the towed
    bike stays on the ground, and you have a hinge (towed bikes forks) for turns.

    Never tried it, but it sounds like it might work.

    Pete
     
  10. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sun, 04 May 2003 22:09:02 GMT, <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    >>When this came up before, one proposed solution was to lower the saddle all the way, turn the bike
    >>over and securely lash the flat central portion of the handlebars to the rack of the tow-bike.
    >>Obviously this won't work if the bike being towed has fenders or a rear rack.
    >
    >FWIW I like this idea. You have one wheel on the ground so you can make turns. Even better would be
    >a setup that could have some rotation between the handlebars and the rack.

    Lash the bars with strips of a cut-up inner tube. There's enough flex to keep the back wheel on the
    pavement. You don't need anything like hose clamps. Cable ties would work for a one-time tow job.
    With a road bike's drop stem, the bars only contact the rear cross member of the rack. Riser bars
    can sit on top.
    --
    zk
     
  11. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 05 May 2003 02:40:52 GMT, "Pete" <[email protected]> from Road Runner High Speed Online --
    Northeast Ohio wrote:

    >How about strapping (securly!) the front wheel to the side of the rack? The back wheel of the towed
    >bike stays on the ground, and you have a hinge (towed bikes forks) for turns.
    >
    >Never tried it, but it sounds like it might work.

    If it doesn't, I'm out a lot of money on a carbon fork! I might try something like that with a
    beater bike, but OCLV carbon is too good to risk damaging.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Everywhere I look I see NEGATIVITY and
    ASPHALT ...
    1:28:10 AM 5 May 2003
     
  12. Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:
    > "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message .look.ca...
    >>
    >> When this came up before, one proposed solution was to lower the saddle all the way, turn the
    >> bike over and securely lash the flat central portion of the handlebars to the rack of the
    >> tow-bike.
    >
    > Well, maybe the poor people do it that way, but here's how the other half live:
    >
    > http://www.birdautomotive.com/Bike%20Rack%20Audi%20TT.htm

    Fabs. Did you write that review they published. I loved it. Here is a little sample. "On top of all
    that it looks really cool!!! I couldn't be happier with it. I get envious stares and questions from
    fellow ..import.. owners when it's on the car, of course I tell them who to call. Thank you so much
    for taking the time to answer my questions , my spouse was so impressed with my choice."

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  13. Kevan Smith wrote:
    > That looks good, except I think that would put too much straing on the fork, because the bike
    > would be entirley supported by it.

    Why don't you think the forks can handle that? I thought the forks were built to support the
    entire bike.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  14. On Sat, 03 May 2003 05:07:58 +0000, Eric S. Sande wrote:

    >>It worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it
    >>in a couple of days.
    >
    > Don't know. But I have seen kids here transporting bicycles by holding them alongside by the stem,
    > it looked effortless but I suppose some practice is required. An interesting solution.

    Effortless it is not. I've done it, and after a short while holding that bike does stress the arm.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It is a scientifically proven fact that a mid life crisis can _`\(,_ | only be cured by
    something racy and Italian. Bianchis and (_)/ (_) | Colnagos are a lot cheaper than Maserattis
    and Ferraris. -- Glenn Davies
     
  15. "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message ...
    > > http://www.birdautomotive.com/Bike%20Rack%20Audi%20TT.htm
    >
    > Fabs. Did you write that review they published. I loved it.
    >
    I like the fact that when you remove the bike rack the receiver pipes that are recessed behind the
    bumper can be mistaken for turbo waste gates!!

    Guys like Zoot will never know the feeling of cycling at this level.

    Of course you'll never transport a lame recumbent in that kind of style, rather for a bent you would
    need one of these:

    http://www.stjohnstruck.com/garbage/stk3734.html
     
  16. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:

    > "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message ...
    > > > http://www.birdautomotive.com/Bike%20Rack%20Audi%20TT.htm
    > >
    > > Fabs. Did you write that review they published. I loved it.
    > >
    > I like the fact that when you remove the bike rack the receiver pipes that are recessed behind the
    > bumper can be mistaken for turbo waste gates!!
    >
    > Guys like Zoot will never know the feeling of cycling at this level.
    >
    > Of course you'll never transport a lame recumbent in that kind of style, rather for a bent you
    > would need one of these:
    >
    > http://www.stjohnstruck.com/garbage/stk3734.html

    STOP! You're killing me!! LOL!
     
  17. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 05 May 2003 20:56:42 -0400, "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> from Lehigh
    University wrote:

    >On Sat, 03 May 2003 05:07:58 +0000, Eric S. Sande wrote:
    >
    >>>It worked fine, but are there any bike carrying racks for bikes? Because now I have to go get it
    >>>in a couple of days.
    >>
    >> Don't know. But I have seen kids here transporting bicycles by holding them alongside by the
    >> stem, it looked effortless but I suppose some practice is required. An interesting solution.
    >
    >Effortless it is not. I've done it, and after a short while holding that bike does stress the arm.

    That sounds too much like upper body exercise.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace My BIOLOGICAL ALARM CLOCK just went off ...
    It has noiseless DOZE FUNCTION and full kitchen!!
    2:26:22 AM 6 May 2003
     
  18. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Mon, 05 May 2003 20:26:23 GMT, "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> from Telia
    Internet wrote:

    >Kevan Smith wrote:
    >> That looks good, except I think that would put too much straing on the fork, because the bike
    >> would be entirley supported by it.
    >
    >Why don't you think the forks can handle that? I thought the forks were built to support the
    >entire bike.

    I'm paranoid.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace I'm wearing PAMPERS!!
    2:22:22 AM 6 May 2003
     
  19. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Tue, 06 May 2003 03:36:50 GMT, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" <[email protected]> from Shaw Residential
    Internet wrote:

    >
    >"Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message ...
    >> > http://www.birdautomotive.com/Bike%20Rack%20Audi%20TT.htm
    >>
    >> Fabs. Did you write that review they published. I loved it.
    >>
    >I like the fact that when you remove the bike rack the receiver pipes that are recessed behind the
    >bumper can be mistaken for turbo waste gates!!
    >
    >Guys like Zoot will never know the feeling of cycling at this level.
    >
    >Of course you'll never transport a lame recumbent in that kind of style, rather for a bent you
    >would need one of these:
    >
    >http://www.stjohnstruck.com/garbage/stk3734.html

    Don't you think that's in a little too good condition? And where's the beard?

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace Hmmm ... a CRIPPLED ACCOUNTANT with a FALAFEL
    sandwich is HIT by a TROLLEY-CAR ...
    2:25:22 AM 6 May 2003
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, Bernie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:
    >
    > > "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message ...
    > > > > http://www.birdautomotive.com/Bike%20Rack%20Audi%20TT.htm
    > > >
    > > > Fabs. Did you write that review they published. I loved it.
    > > >
    > > I like the fact that when you remove the bike rack the receiver pipes that are recessed behind
    > > the bumper can be mistaken for turbo waste gates!!
    > >
    > > Guys like Zoot will never know the feeling of cycling at this level.
    > >
    > > Of course you'll never transport a lame recumbent in that kind of style, rather for a bent you
    > > would need one of these:
    > >
    > > http://www.stjohnstruck.com/garbage/stk3734.html
    >
    > STOP! You're killing me!! LOL!

    He is the Fabrizio. Not only could he drop any of us at will, he is also funnier than any of us. We
    must but behold in awe.

    BTW, I have a theory that Fabrizio Mazzoleni's natural enemy is none of us, but rather Escape
    Velocity Bicycle Club's poet laureate, Sluggo:

    http://escapevelocity.bc.ca/sluggo.html

    Fabs, what's your Sluggo Factor?

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
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