How to walk safely in clipless road shoes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Peter, Aug 11, 2003.

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  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    I've read a number of posts where people have mentioned the hazard of the protruding cleat found on
    many clipless road shoes especially when walking on stairs or tiled surfaces. To solve this problem
    and also to allow me to walk about (if I want to explore a store etcetera I come across when riding)
    I bought an inexpensive pair of light-weight sandals with a strap around the ankle and another strap
    over the foot behind the toes. I put on my cycling shoes and slipped them into the sandals and
    walked around until the cleat (Look/Shimano) made a slight impression in the inside sole of the
    sandals. I removed the sandals and using a razor knife with the blade locked carefully cut out the
    cleat imprint. Now if I need or want to walk around I simply remove the sandals from my cycling
    jersey (middle pocket) and slip them on over my cycling shoes so that the cleat slips into the
    cutout area and snug up the straps. They provide level footing and great traction even on wet floors
    and are easily put on or taken off. Plus I can walk a fair distance in them if need be. They are
    nearly as good as a pair of shoes but without the bulk or the weight. I hope this idea will be of
    use to some of you also.
     
    Tags:


  2. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Peter Prekow writes:

    > I've read a number of posts where people have mentioned the hazard of the protruding cleat found
    > on many clipless road shoes especially when walking on stairs or tiled surfaces. To solve this
    > problem and also to allow me to walk about (if I want to explore a store etcetera I come across
    > when riding) I bought an inexpensive pair of light-weight sandals with a strap around the ankle
    > and another strap over the foot behind the toes.

    Use Tri-shoes with SPD (recessed) cleats. The SH-TO92 shoe:

    http://tinyurl.com/a822

    What you propose is cumbersome and requires carrying extra footwear.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  3. yet, i personally find it a great idea. something i wish i had thought about long ago. i use a
    timbuk2 messenger bag for commuting and the space it allows could easily accomodate a set of sandals
    for taking the stairs at work. just another option....

    no disrespect to jobst at all.

    i recently saw small black SPD covers at my local bike shop. does anyone make something similar for
    look cleats???

    eric

    fresno, ca.

    > From: [email protected] Newsgroups: rec.bicycles.tech Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2003
    > 07:19:51 GMT Subject: Re: How to walk safely in clipless road shoes
    >
    > Peter Prekow writes:
    >
    >> I've read a number of posts where people have mentioned the hazard of the protruding cleat found
    >> on many clipless road shoes especially when walking on stairs or tiled surfaces. To solve this
    >> problem and also to allow me to walk about (if I want to explore a store etcetera I come across
    >> when riding) I bought an inexpensive pair of light-weight sandals with a strap around the ankle
    >> and another strap over the foot behind the toes.
    >
    > Use Tri-shoes with SPD (recessed) cleats. The SH-TO92 shoe:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/a822
    >
    > What you propose is cumbersome and requires carrying extra footwear.
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  4. > i recently saw small black SPD covers at my local bike shop. does anyone make something similar
    > for look cleats???

    They're called "Kool Kovers" and readily available at most better shops. Regarding the original
    poster's idea, I was going to bring along some Nike Aqua Socks to France with me, since they're
    extremely light weight and allow you to walk around without wrecking your shoes. Unfortunately, I
    left them at home, and four hours up on the Tourmalet, walking around on Speedplay cleats, was a bit
    less than ideal for my shoes...

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "eric paul zamora" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BB5C9E3F.E84A%[email protected]...
    > yet, i personally find it a great idea. something i wish i had thought about long ago. i use a
    > timbuk2 messenger bag for commuting and the space
    it
    > allows could easily accomodate a set of sandals for taking the stairs at work. just another
    > option....
    >
    > no disrespect to jobst at all.
    >
    > i recently saw small black SPD covers at my local bike shop. does anyone make something similar
    > for look cleats???
    >
    >
    > eric
    >
    > fresno, ca.
    >
    >
    > > From: [email protected] Newsgroups: rec.bicycles.tech Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2003
    > > 07:19:51 GMT Subject: Re: How to walk safely in clipless road shoes
    > >
    > > Peter Prekow writes:
    > >
    > >> I've read a number of posts where people have mentioned the hazard of the protruding cleat
    > >> found on many clipless road shoes especially when walking on stairs or tiled surfaces. To solve
    > >> this problem and also to allow me to walk about (if I want to explore a store etcetera I come
    > >> across when riding) I bought an inexpensive pair of light-weight sandals with a strap around
    > >> the ankle and another strap over the foot behind the toes.
    > >
    > > Use Tri-shoes with SPD (recessed) cleats. The SH-TO92 shoe:
    > >
    > > http://tinyurl.com/a822
    > >
    > > What you propose is cumbersome and requires carrying extra footwear.
    > >
    > > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  5. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > They're called "Kool Kovers" and readily available at most better shops. Regarding the original
    > poster's idea, I was going to bring along some Nike Aqua Socks to France with me, since they're
    > extremely light weight and allow you to walk around without wrecking your shoes. Unfortunately, I
    > left them at home, and four hours up on the Tourmalet, walking around on Speedplay cleats, was a
    > bit less than ideal for my shoes...

    http://www.koolkovers.us/koolkovers.html

    I've been using them for a while now on Look cleats. They work great. They preserve the cleats
    and they make walking much safer. I broke down and got them after I moved to a place that
    required carrying my bike up and down two flights of concrete stairs. They also make them for
    Speedplay X/Zero.

    --Bill Davidson
    --
    Please remove ".nospam" from my address for email replies.

    I'm a 17 year veteran of usenet -- you'd think I'd be over it by now
     
  6. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    I sell a Look, black, style "Anti Skip" cleat. The square slots hold a soft rubber pad, "IRC Inner
    Rubber Cleat". The pads compress when you are clip in but grip the street when you walk. The pads
    are replaceable and also cut down on the wear of the nose of the cleat. It is a new design that is
    made in Italy.

    $23/pr., shipped, with hardware. Additional pairs in same shipment $20.
     
  7. Mikeyankee

    Mikeyankee Guest

    >How to walk safely in clipless road shoes

    Here's a cheap, effective fix for SPD users. Take home some of that automotive V-belt material you
    often see along the roadside when riding. For each shoe, cut two pieces 4 cm long and glue them to
    the sole using contact cement (oriented lengthwise and placed about 1 cm inboard and outboard of the
    SPD cleat). This keeps the cleat off the ground as you walk, provides good traction and doesn't
    interfere with the pedals. It also wears better than the SPD "outriggers" that come with cleats, and
    the similar raised areas on Carnac SPD adapters.

    Mike Yankee

    (Address is munged to thwart spammers. To reply, delete everything after "com".)
     
  8. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    I sell a Look, black, style "Anti Skip" cleat. The square slots hold a soft rubber pad, "IRC Inner
    Rubber Cleat". The pads compress when you are clip in but grip the street when you walk. The pads
    are replaceable and also cut down on the wear of the nose of the cleat. It is a new design that is
    made in Italy.

    $23/pr., shipped, with hardware. Additional pairs in same shipment $20.

    I just checked and the cleat is available in red with rotation as well. I don't have that model in
    stock at this moment but it is available in a couple of days.
     
  9. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > i recently saw small black SPD covers at my local bike shop. does
    anyone
    > > make something similar for look cleats???
    >
    > They're called "Kool Kovers" and readily available at most better shops.

    Kool Stop makes covers for SPD cleats?

    > Regarding the original poster's idea, I was going to bring along some Nike Aqua Socks to France
    > with me, since they're extremely light weight and
    allow
    > you to walk around without wrecking your shoes. Unfortunately, I left
    them
    > at home, and four hours up on the Tourmalet, walking around on Speedplay cleats, was a bit less
    > than ideal for my shoes...
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
    >

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  10. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Mike Yankee writes:

    >>How to walk safely in clipless road shoes

    > Here's a cheap, effective fix for SPD users. Take home some of that automotive V-belt material you
    > often see along the roadside when riding. For each shoe, cut two pieces 4 cm long and glue them to
    > the sole using contact cement (oriented lengthwise and placed about 1 cm inboard and outboard of
    > the SPD cleat). This keeps the cleat off the ground as you walk, provides good traction and
    > doesn't interfere with the pedals. It also wears better than the SPD "outriggers" that come with
    > cleats, and the similar raised areas on Carnac SPD adapters.

    That is trying to make SH-TO92 shoes crudely. Just get the right shoes. http://tinyurl.com/a822

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  11. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > They're called "Kool Kovers" and readily available at most better shops.

    There are a bunch of different companies selling Look cleat covers for walking. My favorite are made
    from a thin hard plastic, instead of soft rubber. The thin ones are very compact, taking up little
    space in your pocket when you're on the bike. Sorry, I don't remember the brand name right now.
     
  12. F1

    F1 Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Mike Yankee writes:
    >
    > >>How to walk safely in clipless road shoes
    >
    > > Here's a cheap, effective fix for SPD users. Take home some of that automotive V-belt material
    > > you often see along the roadside when riding. For each shoe, cut two pieces 4 cm long and glue
    > > them to the sole using contact cement (oriented lengthwise and placed about 1 cm inboard and
    > > outboard of the SPD cleat). This keeps the cleat off the ground as you walk, provides good
    > > traction and doesn't interfere with the pedals. It also wears better than the SPD "outriggers"
    > > that come with cleats, and the similar raised areas on Carnac SPD adapters.
    >
    > That is trying to make SH-TO92 shoes crudely. Just get the right shoes. http://tinyurl.com/a822
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA

    It might be crude, but it is certainly much cheaper than buying a whole new pair of shoes and could
    serve the same purpose.
     
  13. eyagerusenet

    eyagerusenet Guest

    Peter <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I've read a number of posts where people have mentioned the hazard of the protruding cleat found
    > on many clipless road shoes especially when walking on stairs or tiled surfaces. To solve this
    > problem and also to allow me to walk about (if I want to explore a store etcetera I come across
    > when riding) I bought an inexpensive pair of light-weight sandals with a strap around the ankle
    > and another strap over the foot behind the toes. I put on my cycling shoes and slipped them into
    > the sandals and walked around until the cleat (Look/Shimano) made a slight impression in the
    > inside sole of the sandals. I removed the sandals and using a razor knife with the blade locked
    > carefully cut out the cleat imprint. Now if I need or want to walk around I simply remove the
    > sandals from my cycling jersey (middle pocket) and slip them on over my cycling shoes so that the
    > cleat slips into the cutout area and snug up the straps. They provide level footing and great
    > traction even on wet floors and are easily put on or taken off. Plus I can walk a fair distance in
    > them if need be. They are nearly as good as a pair of shoes but without the bulk or the weight. I
    > hope this idea will be of use to some of you also.

    Shoe Goo can help give road shoes some traction. Just smear a little bit of in on the parts of the
    shoe that can come in contact the ground. This method works well with Speedplay X series of cleats.
    For look cleats, make sure you put the shoe goo in a place that won't interfere with the cleat
    interface. If you climb stairs, put a layer of shoe goo on the sole of the show around the arches of
    the foot and in the toe area to prevent slippage on the edges of the shair should you misstep.
    --
    Eric [email protected]
     
  14. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Ben Formula writes:

    >>>>How to walk safely in clipless road shoes

    >>> Here's a cheap, effective fix for SPD users. Take home some of that automotive V-belt material
    >>> you often see along the roadside when riding. For each shoe, cut two pieces 4 cm long and glue
    >>> them to the sole using contact cement (oriented lengthwise and placed about 1 cm inboard and
    >>> outboard of the SPD cleat). This keeps the cleat off the ground as you walk, provides good
    >>> traction and doesn't interfere with the pedals. It also wears better than the SPD "outriggers"
    >>> that come with cleats, and the similar raised areas on Carnac SPD adapters.

    >> That is trying to make SH-TO92 shoes crudely. Just get the right shoes. http://tinyurl.com/a822

    > It might be crude, but it is certainly much cheaper than buying a whole new pair of shoes and
    > could serve the same purpose.

    Just because the wrong shoe was mistakenly bought does not mean you have to live with them ever
    after. The suggestion of the SH-TO92 is offered for those who have not yet bought shoes with slick
    bottoms with a tiny insert of rubber at the toe and heel and use Look cleats.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  15. Robin Hubert wrote:
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >>>i recently saw small black SPD covers at my local bike shop. does anyone make something similar
    >>>for look cleats???
    >>
    >>They're called "Kool Kovers" and readily available at most better shops.
    >
    > Kool Stop makes covers for SPD cleats?

    I think you read it wrong. Someone said they saw covers for SPD cleats and asked if there was
    something similar for Look cleats and Mike pointed out the Kool Kovers. Nobody said the SPD covers
    were Kool Kovers.

    --Bill Davidson
    --
    Please remove ".nospam" from my address for email replies.

    I'm a 17 year veteran of usenet -- you'd think I'd be over it by now
     
  16. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Hello there. I sincerely hope I did not offend anyone here. My original post was submitted with the
    intent to share a solution to a problem I felt others have also encountered that 1 worked, 2 was
    quick to implement and, 3 was inexpensive. The sandals I purchased cost less than $10. They easily
    fit into my jersey pocket and are not bulky. In fact on many occasions I had to reassure myself that
    they were still in the jersey pocket. They weigh less than a couple of medium bananas. In addition
    unlike putting a non-slip substance or strip of rubber on the shoe bottom these sandals make the
    feet level instead of toes up taking the strain off my ankles. This greatly enhances the ability to
    walk a long distance should the need or desire arise. Unfortunately not everyone has the funds to
    buy purpose made accessories. When I asked a well known bike shop in another nearby city for
    something that would allow me to walk safely in Look/Shimano cleats I was told that nothing was
    available and I would have to buy new pedals and shoes for about $150. My 20+ years old Adidas Eddy
    Mercks shoes and Dura Ace pedals are still perfectly servicable. The sandals are a solution to a
    problem I had that I found greatly enhances my safety (enjoyment) when off the bike. Again my intent
    was to share a safe inexpensive solution with others, some of whom had mentioned the hazard of
    walking down stairs with a bike on a near or daily basis.

    [email protected] (Peter) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've read a number of posts where people have mentioned the hazard of the protruding cleat found
    > on many clipless road shoes especially when walking on stairs or tiled surfaces. To solve this
    > problem and also to allow me to walk about (if I want to explore a store etcetera I come across
    > when riding) I bought an inexpensive pair of light-weight sandals with a strap around the ankle
    > and another strap over the foot behind the toes. I put on my cycling shoes and slipped them into
    > the sandals and walked around until the cleat (Look/Shimano) made a slight impression in the
    > inside sole of the sandals. I removed the sandals and using a razor knife with the blade locked
    > carefully cut out the cleat imprint. Now if I need or want to walk around I simply remove the
    > sandals from my cycling jersey (middle pocket) and slip them on over my cycling shoes so that the
    > cleat slips into the cutout area and snug up the straps. They provide level footing and great
    > traction even on wet floors and are easily put on or taken off. Plus I can walk a fair distance in
    > them if need be. They are nearly as good as a pair of shoes but without the bulk or the weight. I
    > hope this idea will be of use to some of you also.
     
  17. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Use Tri-shoes with SPD (recessed) cleats> What you propose is cumbersome and requires carrying
    > extra footwear.

    if you're going to consider SPDs, why not get a nice pair of mountain shoes? for the life of me,
    nothing beats 'em for walking around. unless you are professional, i cant imagine they'd be holding
    you back any, and even then not much.

    i use mtn shoes with spd cleats. i wear them every day, and two or three times a week i wear them
    all day. you have to walk just a little bit funny because the soles are stiff (good for cycling, bad
    for walking) but its not that different than normal shoes. and i cant imagine itd be any less
    comfortable than tri shoes, covered cleats, etc.

    maybe im missing something. cheers,

    anthony
     
  18. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Anthony Anagnostou writes:

    >> Use Tri-shoes with SPD (recessed) cleats. What you propose is cumbersome and requires carrying
    >> extra footwear.

    > If you're going to consider SPDs, why not get a nice pair of mountain shoes? for the life of me,
    > nothing beats 'em for walking around. unless you are professional, I can't imagine they'd be
    > holding you back any, and even then not much.

    I take it you didn't look at the TO92. These shoes are to mountain shoes what oxfords are to hiking
    boots. I am not one to walk in boots when I can use simple rubber soled shoes. I too use these to
    walk around all day at work after riding to work. That's why I have them. Besides, I didn't discover
    these advantages on the spur of the moment underway so that I needed to buy sandals. These are a
    considered purchase.

    > I use MTN shoes with SPD cleats. I wear them every day, and two or three times a week I wear them
    > all day. You have to walk just a little bit funny because the soles are stiff (good for cycling,
    > bad for walking) but its not that different than normal shoes. I can't imagine it'd be any less
    > comfortable than tri shoes, covered cleats, etc.

    I guess you wear big brogans all the time or you wouldn't feel comfortable in the MTB shoes all
    day. Besides, most of these are waffle stompers that bring all sorts of debris into the office
    when it's wet.

    > Maybe I'm missing something.

    I think so.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  19. John Albergo

    John Albergo Guest

    Peter wrote:

    >I've read a number of posts where people have mentioned the hazard of the protruding cleat found on
    >many clipless road shoes especially when walking on stairs or tiled surfaces. To solve this problem
    >and also to allow me to walk about (if I want to explore a store etcetera I come across when
    >riding) I bought an inexpensive pair of light-weight sandals with a strap around the ankle and
    >another strap over the foot behind the toes. I put on my cycling shoes and slipped them into the
    >sandals and walked around until the cleat (Look/Shimano) made a slight impression in the inside
    >sole of the sandals. I removed the sandals and using a razor knife with the blade locked carefully
    >cut out the cleat imprint. Now if I need or want to walk around I simply remove the sandals from my
    >cycling jersey (middle pocket) and slip them on over my cycling shoes so that the cleat slips into
    >the cutout area and snug up the straps. They provide level footing and great traction even on wet
    >floors and are easily put on or taken off. Plus I can walk a fair distance in them if need be. They
    >are nearly as good as a pair of shoes but without the bulk or the weight. I hope this idea will be
    >of use to some of you also.
    >
    >
    For casual walking when off the bike, get a shoe that has enough 'soul' so that the cleat doesn't
    contact the ground. For commuting situation I just keep a pair of shoes at work.

    I cannot understand why so many spd shoes are made to allow the cleat to scrape the ground. All that
    is needed is a small amount of tread to prevent this. What is the advantage to NOT having this
    material on the shoe? Is this all in the interest of a few grams of weight? Or is it catering to the
    notion that a "serious" bike shoe must be impractical?
     
  20. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 03:05:02 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >I take it you didn't look at the TO92. These shoes are to mountain shoes what oxfords are to hiking
    >boots. I am not one to walk in boots when I can use simple rubber soled shoes. I too use these to
    >walk around all day at work after riding to work. That's why I have them. Besides, I didn't
    >discover these advantages on the spur of the moment underway so that I needed to buy sandals. These
    >are a considered purchase.

    I got a pair of T091 before any store locally had them and special ordered. They worked so well that
    I bought another pair to put on the shelf lest Shimano discontinue as they did the first offering of
    SPD sandals. Frankly, I don't understand why more companies don't offer this type of 'touring shoe'.
    A good majority of riders walk in their cycling shoes and most don't need lugged soles.

    I have the SPD sandals as well. They work fine too but on long rides or in the hills, my feet
    get tired.
     
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