How to walk safely in clipless road shoes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Peter, Aug 11, 2003.

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  1. On 11 Aug 2003, Jobst Brandt wrote:

    > Anthony Anagnostou writes:
    >
    >> If you're going to consider SPDs, why not get a nice pair of mountain shoes? for the life of me,
    >> nothing beats 'em for walking around. unless you are professional, I can't imagine they'd be
    >> holding you back any, and even then not much.
    >
    > I take it you didn't look at the TO92....

    Shimano makes nice shoes, no question. They make narrow shoes, however, such that even a fairly
    modest D width foot is uncomfortable in them. For those of us with broader feet, Sidi makes an
    excellent alternative in their so-called Mega width. The Sidi Mega Dominator, despite its name, is a
    mostly black, very comfortable shoe with a nice tread. The only difference between the Dominator
    "mountain" shoe and its sister "Genius" shoe is the sole and tread. A very nice touring shoe.

    http://www.terrybicycles.com/Apparel/1600.lasso

    (Despite the copy, the shoes fit men just fine too).

    Kind Regards, Bruce.
     


  2. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 11 Aug 2003 19:13:38 -0700, Peter <[email protected]> wrote:
    > to implement and, 3 was inexpensive. The sandals I purchased cost less than $10. They easily fit
    > into my jersey pocket and are not bulky. In

    I had thought to mention, but did not post, that your idea is a good one; and an idea along
    similar lines, which I've done, is to carry such sandals, and just remove the cycling shoes to put
    on the sandals.

    This has the added benefit of allowing your feet to cool off and breathe. Of course, then you have
    to deal with carrying around cycling shoes.

    I saw somebody today in a sandwich shop who obviously came in a car (obvious by the keys she was
    holding, and the way she was holding them, and the lack of helmet hair or sweat on a hot day), but
    was wearing Diadora shoes that sure looked like cycling shoes, right down to the velcro. I should
    have asked...

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 04:09:06 GMT, John Albergo <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I cannot understand why so many spd shoes are made to allow the cleat to scrape the ground. All
    > that is needed is a small amount of tread to prevent this. What is the advantage to NOT having
    > this material on the shoe? Is this all in the interest of a few grams of weight? Or is it catering
    > to the notion that a "serious" bike shoe must be impractical?

    Maybe it's an elitist aero concern.

    How about SPD-R? I was unable to find SPD-R shoes that recess the cleat, because, supposedly, the
    cleat is too big and such.

    I ended up cutting blocks of rubber from some spare sandals and using rubber cement to adhere them
    to my shoes. It worked well, and rather than interfering with pedal engagement, quite assisted in
    lining me up.

    The rubber cement bond was not strong enough to the plastic sole of the shoe, and the blocks came
    off. They worked nicely for riding and walking while they were on. I have since replaced the SPD-Rs
    with SPDs, and the smaller cleat seems easier to walk on, but I may yet try the same experiment,
    replacing rubber cement with epoxy.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 17:24:41 -0400 (EDT), Chris Zacho "The Wheelman <[email protected]> wrote:
    > You can also make your own with an old MTB tube. Cut two strips about 16 or so inches in length
    > and then make a slice lengthwise in each. Now simply tie the rubber strips around your shoe
    > covering the cleats.

    I suppose the result might look something like this:
    http://www.imagemakersart.com/images/getz-03.jpg

    > May you have the wind at your back.

    Not around here, I may not. Always a headwind, and always uphill both ways.

    > And a really low gear for the hills!

    Not if I don't want to spend a lot of money to replace a bunch of stuff and make it a triple! :)

    > Chris
    >
    > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  5. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I got a pair of T091 before any store locally had them and special ordered. They worked so well
    > that I bought another pair to put on the shelf lest Shimano discontinue as they did the first
    > offering of SPD sandals. Frankly, I don't understand why more companies don't offer this type
    > of 'touring shoe'. A good majority of riders walk in their cycling shoes and most don't need
    > lugged soles.

    It's about markting and image. Bike manufacturers have to move product at a profit, so they pander
    to the common fantasy of being the Great Undiscovered Talent (for younger riders) or the Guy Who
    Coulda Been (for us old duffers).

    Ever noticed that cheap helmets look like sytrofoam salad bowls and expensive helmets look cool,
    sleek, aero and aggressive? They cost the same to make, give or take a couple of bucks. But one
    helmet goes for $30 and the other for $130. The cool factor costs more than any other attribute of
    the product.

    Ditto shoes: aggressive tread (even though it's useless when you're riding a bike), garish colors,
    ratchet devices to offer a fraction of the adjustability of laces, yadda yadda yadda. Simple,
    cheaper shoes tend to be plug-ugly. The cool factor rears its head again.

    Let me toss my shoe recommendation into the mix: Lake MX101. Great, simple shoe. Works great on and
    off the bike, needs a little trimming for the cleats of Frogs. I rode all over the Alps in 'em,
    happy as could be, and then walked all over Paris in 'em- also happy as could be. Climbing the
    Eiffel Tower is easier than the Galibier, BTW.
     
  6. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 21:05:46 -0500, Tim McNamara <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Ditto shoes: aggressive tread (even though it's useless when you're riding a bike), garish colors,
    > ratchet devices to offer a fraction of the

    Ever find a hill so steep that your MTB can't dig in for enough traction?

    The only way up is with a whole lot of traction from aggressive tread on the shoes.

    This doesn't apply, obviously, to road and touring.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  7. robertpalmer

    robertpalmer Guest

    I'm on board with the Shoo-Goo idea. I coated the bottom of my Speedplay cleats, and the toe and
    heel areas of my shoes before a week-long tour that involved a lot of walking. Worked like a charm.
     
  8. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 21:05:46 -0500, Tim McNamara <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Ditto shoes: aggressive tread (even though it's useless when you're riding a bike), garish
    > > colors, ratchet devices to offer a fraction of the
    >
    > Ever find a hill so steep that your MTB can't dig in for enough traction?

    Nope.
     
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