How would this penalty work?

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Harold Buck, May 24, 2003.

  1. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    Suppose John Doe is in the run portion of this Ironman and he gets a time penalty for, say,
    littering. Do they make him stop for 2 minutes (or whatever the amount of time is) and then let him
    go, or is it tacked onto his time at the end of the race?

    Asuming it is tacked on, what happens if he finishes in 16:59:00? That would make his time 17:01:00,
    which would be over the cutoff. Does he suddenly go from finisher to non-finisher?

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
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  2. Old Timer

    Old Timer Guest

    Good question! I'd however, prefer to see a DQ for a littering penalty. There is absolutely no
    reason to litter at any triathlon. My guess at an answer to your question is if someone is that
    serious attention to assessing penalities mostly occurs at the competitive level, and for someone
    just hoping to finish under the gun the penalty would be ignored.
     
  3. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Old Timer) wrote:

    > Good question! I'd however, prefer to see a DQ for a littering penalty. There is absolutely no
    > reason to litter at any triathlon. My guess at an answer to your question is if someone is that
    > serious attention to assessing penalities mostly occurs at the competitive level, and for someone
    > just hoping to finish under the gun the penalty would be ignored.

    I agree that intentional littering should be met with a harsh penalty. However, if you're riding on
    your bike and legitimately accidentally drop something (a bottle, a gel flask, a wrapper, etc.),
    it's probably more dangerous to turn around to try to pick it up than it is to let it go.

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  4. Old Timer

    Old Timer Guest

    I agree with you Harold, and I thought about that. That is not deliberate, and an official who might
    witness you doing such a thing would doubtlessly be able to tell the difference. I know I can tell
    when someone drops something by accident vs. on purpose. I bitched up a storm at a guy on the bike
    at IMUSA last year when he simply threw a gatorade bottle alongside of the road on the gorgeous pass
    through the mountains on the back side of the course. I wish I could have reported him myself but
    the rules don't allow for that. There was absolutely no reason for that guy to do that, he had a
    bottle holder for it and could have done it at a bottle exchange.

    Mike

    Harold Buck <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Old
    > Timer) wrote:
    >
    > > Good question! I'd however, prefer to see a DQ for a littering penalty. There is absolutely no
    > > reason to litter at any triathlon. My guess at an answer to your question is if someone is that
    > > serious attention to assessing penalities mostly occurs at the competitive level, and for
    > > someone just hoping to finish under the gun the penalty would be ignored.
    >
    >
    > I agree that intentional littering should be met with a harsh penalty. However, if you're riding
    > on your bike and legitimately accidentally drop something (a bottle, a gel flask, a wrapper,
    > etc.), it's probably more dangerous to turn around to try to pick it up than it is to let it go.
    >
    > --Harold Buck
    >
    >
    > "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."
    >
    > - Homer J. Simpson
     
  5. Harold Buck wrote:

    > Suppose John Doe is in the run portion of this Ironman and he gets a time penalty for, say,
    > littering. Do they make him stop for 2 minutes (or whatever the amount of time is) and then let
    > him go, or is it tacked onto his time at the end of the race?

    Under USAT age group rules it's tacked on to his time and it's a 4 or 6 minute penalty at
    this distance.

    >
    > Asuming it is tacked on, what happens if he finishes in 16:59:00? That would make his time
    > 17:01:00, which would be over the cutoff. Does he suddenly go from finisher to non-finisher?

    Yes.

    JJ

    >
    > --Harold Buck
    >
    >
    > "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."
    >
    > - Homer J. Simpson
     
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