How Would You Describe "Cycling Culture"?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by CyclingCultureWho?, Dec 27, 2015.

  1. CyclingCultureWho?

    CyclingCultureWho? New Member

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    I'm trying to figure out how we describe the cycling culture. What makes us unique and have the ability to bond other than the obvious fact we all have a bike, is it the life style, the common interest in fitness...

    In a brief sentence or two how would you describe the cycling community and what the shared morals/interests are. Please also state which style bicycle you ride (Road/MT/Fixie)
    Thank you

    *For College Culture Project
     


  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Which one are you talking about? There's road culture, touring culture, MTB culture, urban culture culture, freeride culture, etc., etc. And then you can break them into subcultures. And while they share one common element, bicycular perambulation, the differences are striking.
     
  3. bykster

    bykster Member

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    Hm, now that I think about, you're right, there are few subcultures out there. I'm not a part of one though, I'm a loner, but I have noticed various different groups of bikers riding.
     
  4. CyclingCultureWho?

    CyclingCultureWho? New Member

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    I'm focusing in on those as well, there is the culture of Cycling but subcultures as you stated. I'm trying to figure out what separates the subcultures; the different common interests. Thanks for the replies guys
     
  5. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Quote by OBC:
    "...the differences are striking."

    And many.
     
  6. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    I've never thought of a cycling culture. I've always been active, playing softball, volleyball leagues, racquetball, football, pumping iron, running and cycling. I've always thought more of an athletic culture, not just a cycling culture.
     
  7. jrschultz

    jrschultz Member

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    There's something special about being a cyclist, and all cyclist's know it. Here's how I know: When I'm on a ride, and I pass another cyclist, we give each other a wave or head nod. We don't know anything about one another, but we know enough to wave. When I was in Hawaii the wave was the "hang loose" sign...very cool! So, an aspect of cycling culture involves taking notice of another human being who shares the same passion as you.
     
  8. GemmaRowlands

    GemmaRowlands Member

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    I ride a road bike, and one of the things that I like the most about the culture is the fact that no matter where you are, if you see another person riding a bike, you will greet them and they will greet you. Sometimes, I can see the same people over and over again in various places, and I think it is wonderful as you get to know people within the cycling community. I believe that cyclists are some of the very friendliest people around.
     
  9. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    My guess of a cycling culture is what I see. As I had posted in other threads, the town I live in is adjacent to the cyclist's haven called Antipolo so it is normal to see cyclists passing by our main road. They are mostly in groups for more than 10 and sometimes there are groups I see that number more than a hundred. So basically, cycling here is a group activity.
     
  10. Johnny Rad

    Johnny Rad New Member

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    Sorry, I couldn't keep it to a sentence or two. I thought about going with a single run-on sentence, but...

    My buddy who doesn't ride gives me a hard time about why amateur cyclists / weekend warriors wear exactly the same gear as professionals. I defensively blurt out aero and comfort, but he has a point. There aren't many sports where amateurs dress nearly identically to pros. I think it works against us when neophytes start cycling and wonder why we're so obsessed with expensive race gear, tight lycra, saving watts and grams with carbon bits and ceramic bobbles, shaving seconds on Strava and, of course, the "unwritten rules" (http://www.velominati.com/the-rules/). If greenhorns don't commit 100% to the esoteric ways of cycling, my experience is that some of us regrettably look down on them.

    Who sincerely waves to the weirdo wearing jeans on the crazy old steel bike with downtime shifters? Who isn't disappointed when a distressed rider on the side of the road actually says "yes" after you yell "is everything OK?" Who rolls their eyes - even a little bit - at folks looking to get into cycling and only have $200 on a bike? As I grow older (and hopefully wiser or at least way less uptight!), I'm trying harder to be a better person in life in general.
     
  11. AliciaLazzaro

    AliciaLazzaro New Member

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    All reply is really great. i get my all information here. thanks all.
     
  12. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    I wouldn't. There are to many different types of people with different types of equipment, reasons for riding and styles to define it as a single cycling culture. Diverse would be to only thing I could think of and even that doesn't quite work.
     
  13. doctorold

    doctorold Member

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    Cycling culture seems to be different regionally as well. Frankly, it's pretty crappy in the region where I live. Not very cohesive.
     
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