hp speedmachine



C

chris

Guest
Hello,
I am new to recumbents. I have been riding bike for a couple of years
as a way to get out, but have been riding an old beater upright that was
handed down to me from my father. Now, that bike is starting to fall
apart, and I need to get a new bike. Since I cannot justify
spending as much as I will need to more than once in a long time, I only
have one shot at getting a good and nice bike.
I have tried the Volae bikes at the Hostel Shop in Wisconsin. They were
fast and efficient, but I really liked the suspended bikes.
I have been looking at the Speedmachine, because I liked the ride on the
Street Machine. I also like what I have read on HP's website as far
as their philosophies (the fact that they use Linux also put them up a
notch for me ;-). The Hostel Shop does not carry the Speedmachine because
they have had problems selling them. People supposedly think it looks
cool, but then don't like getting on and off of it. I have also heard that
the weight is a problem on hills, but I am very used to pedaling the lead
weight I have now up hills, and it doesn't bother me. I slow down, and
enjoy the scenery:)
I am looking for a bike that is fun, comfortable and
well built. That is what the Speedmachine looks like to me, but I could be
mistaken. Does anyone have any experience with the Speedmachine, good or
bad? I have seen several old posts that seem fairly positive, but I
thought I would ask for some more input before I waste myself trying to
track one down.
 
B

bent_pilot

Guest
"chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hello,

snip
They were
> fast and efficient, but I really liked the suspended bikes.
> I have been looking at the Speedmachine, because I liked the ride on the
> Street Machine. I also like what I have read on HP's website as far
> as their philosophies (the fact that they use Linux also put them up a
> notch for me ;-).snip


I bought a used SM last year. I had to get a new seat (small fits, med was
on the bike and is too long for my torso) and replaced the front Clara
brake, which developed an expensive leak in a piston, and I had to replace
pads because the calipers weren't parallel. The bike had the stem
replacement done under the recall. I aslo replaced the NMR shock when it
puked out its guts, with a DT Swiss air shock. It's taken many hours of
tweaking things like the brake calipers to center them on the discs, and
finding a way to rout cables and hoses so they don't rub my legs. I also
would like to get a handle bar made that has some more clearence for my
shins (more of a problem in the cold weather when I wear heavy tights).

Last year was a poor one for my conditioning and my miles were really low,
so the SM wasn't the ecstatic experience I had had in mind. This year things
are a bit different. Three + hours a week on the trainer has paid a
significant dividend in speed and distance. I'm cruising two or three miles
and hour faster at this early time in the season than I did on my V-REX at
the end of the season. My bike handling has improved a lot too. I can crank
to 25 or so and hold a fairly straight line (no I don't cruise that
fast...don't I wish...) where last year I'd weave across the road when I
tried that. The suspension works. I can take the rough sections of the trail
where I ride at speed. My buddy on his Trice XXL gets hammered on these
sections. All in all the effort and cost to sort out the bike and listening
to the SO complain about the bike bills was well worth it.

I'll never be a racer (I couldn't get there when I was 40 and now I'm 62 and
a ton heavier) but it is a lot more fun going 16 or 18 with the ever more
frequent excursions to the low 20's than it was going 14 to 15 on the RANS.
I'm also finding that on the few hills around here I use my granny less and
less. On the shorter stuff, I even try to accellerate without getting my
heartrate too high.

So even with sometimes annoying loud chain tubes (sometimes I can rotate the
main tube to its sweet spot and then the chain is nearly silent) and $25.00
teflon chain spray form Germany, I'm a happy camper, and I get happier with
each ride. By the way, mine's red.



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M

Mark Leuck

Guest
I briefly rode one 2 years ago, pretty good bike although I wanted tiller
steering instead of the U-bar, you will like it

"chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hello,
> I am new to recumbents. I have been riding bike for a couple of years
> as a way to get out, but have been riding an old beater upright that was
> handed down to me from my father. Now, that bike is starting to fall
> apart, and I need to get a new bike. Since I cannot justify
> spending as much as I will need to more than once in a long time, I only
> have one shot at getting a good and nice bike.
> I have tried the Volae bikes at the Hostel Shop in Wisconsin. They were
> fast and efficient, but I really liked the suspended bikes.
> I have been looking at the Speedmachine, because I liked the ride on the
> Street Machine. I also like what I have read on HP's website as far
> as their philosophies (the fact that they use Linux also put them up a
> notch for me ;-). The Hostel Shop does not carry the Speedmachine because
> they have had problems selling them. People supposedly think it looks
> cool, but then don't like getting on and off of it. I have also heard that
> the weight is a problem on hills, but I am very used to pedaling the lead
> weight I have now up hills, and it doesn't bother me. I slow down, and
> enjoy the scenery:)
> I am looking for a bike that is fun, comfortable and
> well built. That is what the Speedmachine looks like to me, but I could be
> mistaken. Does anyone have any experience with the Speedmachine, good or
> bad? I have seen several old posts that seem fairly positive, but I
> thought I would ask for some more input before I waste myself trying to
> track one down.
>
 
R

RobD

Guest
It goes without saying that the choice of OS makes all the differance when
slogging up a 25% hill in the rain!!!!!
yea im sold......not

Rob D


"chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hello,
> I am new to recumbents. I have been riding bike for a couple of years
> as a way to get out, but have been riding an old beater upright that was
> handed down to me from my father. Now, that bike is starting to fall
> apart, and I need to get a new bike. Since I cannot justify
> spending as much as I will need to more than once in a long time, I only
> have one shot at getting a good and nice bike.
> I have tried the Volae bikes at the Hostel Shop in Wisconsin. They were
> fast and efficient, but I really liked the suspended bikes.
> I have been looking at the Speedmachine, because I liked the ride on the
> Street Machine. I also like what I have read on HP's website as far
> as their philosophies (the fact that they use Linux also put them up a
> notch for me ;-). The Hostel Shop does not carry the Speedmachine because
> they have had problems selling them. People supposedly think it looks
> cool, but then don't like getting on and off of it. I have also heard that
> the weight is a problem on hills, but I am very used to pedaling the lead
> weight I have now up hills, and it doesn't bother me. I slow down, and
> enjoy the scenery:)
> I am looking for a bike that is fun, comfortable and
> well built. That is what the Speedmachine looks like to me, but I could be
> mistaken. Does anyone have any experience with the Speedmachine, good or
> bad? I have seen several old posts that seem fairly positive, but I
> thought I would ask for some more input before I waste myself trying to
> track one down.
>
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
chris wrote:

> The Hostel Shop does not carry the Speedmachine because
> they have had problems selling them. People supposedly think it looks
> cool, but then don't like getting on and off of it.


I've got a Streetmachine, but I've played on the Kinetics SpM
demonstrators on more than one occasion. It's certainly more awkward to
get on than the StM (you more get /into/ it than /onto/ it), but not
ridiculously so, and not obviously worse than other OSS machines in the
general class I've tried.

As for not liking getting *off*, every bike should be like that! ;-)

> I have also heard that
> the weight is a problem on hills, but I am very used to pedaling the lead
> weight I have now up hills, and it doesn't bother me. I slow down, and
> enjoy the scenery:)


The SpM is a bit of a lump, but less of a lump than the StM and I can
get that up everything I've tried with full touring gear in 4 panniers:
as long as you have the gears and legs you will get there. Lighter
would be nicer, but only if all else was equal, and things like HP Vel's
build quality and superb suspension setups mean all else isn't equal.

> I am looking for a bike that is fun, comfortable and
> well built.


check, check, check.

If I had the spare money I'd probably have one as well as the StM. If
you don't need the lowrider panniers the StM allows then it would be an
excellent fast touring machine, as well as a blast out for a day.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
chris wrote:
> Does anyone have any experience with the
> Speedmachine, good or bad? I have seen several old posts that seem
> fairly positive, but I thought I would ask for some more input before
> I waste myself trying to track one down.


I've been using one as my #1 bike for four years. A touch heavy, but the
suspension works very well and it's the most comfortable bike I've ever
owned. Mine was built up from a frameset by Darth Stuart, so the components
are a bit more upmarket than those now fitted as standard.

Highly recommended.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
And I begged, "Angel of the Lord, what are these tortured screams?" And
the angel said unto me, "These are the cries of the carrots, the cries
of the carrots! You see, Reverend Maynard, tomorrow is harvest day and
to them it is the holocaust."
 
B

bent_pilot

Guest
"chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
>snip
> I am looking for a bike that is fun, comfortable and
> well built.


It's decided then. Which color will you be ordering?




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P

Peter Clinch

Guest
bent_pilot wrote:

> It's decided then. Which color will you be ordering?


Note that you can have any colour you like from the RAL chart as an
extra cost option...

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
R

Roos Eisma

Guest
Peter Clinch <[email protected]> writes:

>bent_pilot wrote:


>> It's decided then. Which color will you be ordering?


>Note that you can have any colour you like from the RAL chart as an
>extra cost option...


Though the RAL chart seems to be missing Proper Purple...

Roos
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Roos Eisma wrote:

> Though the RAL chart seems to be missing Proper Purple...


As sported by Roos' Nazca Fiero, which is an alternative well built,
sporty semi-low that is also quite capable of touring. It's a 20/20
rather than a 20/26 and Nazca do a similar range of options to HP Vel,
but you can have Dual Drive as well as derailleurs or Rohloff and an
underseat steering option (which Ross has). The "Tour" model has full
suspension, the standard just at the rear but Nazca will do you a
Pantour hub as an option. Like the SpM it isn't a lightweight, though
it won't dent your wallet quite so much.

The most telling difference is that Nazca's seat is more 3d, wrapping
around the hips more, and cut away by the shoulder blades. Is that
better? Well, it depends on your particular back. Ross prefers the
Nazca seat and I prefer the HP Vel seat, mileage does vary, so try
options if you can...

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
B

bent_pilot

Guest
"Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Roos Eisma wrote:
>
>> Though the RAL chart seems to be missing Proper Purple...

>
> As sported by Roos' Nazca Fiero, which is an alternative well built,
> sporty semi-low that is also quite capable of touring. It's a 20/20
> rather than a 20/26 and Nazca do a similar range of options to HP Vel, but
> you can have Dual Drive as well as derailleurs or Rohloff and an underseat
> steering option (which Ross has). The "Tour" model has full suspension,
> the standard just at the rear but Nazca will do you a Pantour hub as an
> option. Like the SpM it isn't a lightweight, though it won't dent your
> wallet quite so much.
>
> The most telling difference is that Nazca's seat is more 3d, wrapping
> around the hips more, and cut away by the shoulder blades. Is that
> better? Well, it depends on your particular back. Ross prefers the Nazca
> seat and I prefer the HP Vel seat, mileage does vary, so try options if
> you can...
>
> Pete.
> --
> Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
> Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
> Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
> net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
>
>

Perhaps to you blokes on the right side of the big pond Velos and Nazcas are
a bit more available for purchase. On this side, the Velos are rare and the
Nazca is something one might read about in an article over in brol land
written by that agent of the US government who was sent to Germany to keep
an eye the very cool bikes not to be found on our fair shores.

Having found my gem through the used bike market, I don't keep quite so
close tabs on Velos' availability, but the Bike Rack in St. Charles Il, say
they can order them, and Trike Trails in Canada advertises that they have
them. And the occasional one does surface used. Sounds like if you have your
heart set on a right proper purple one, though, you're SOL.



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P

Peter Clinch

Guest
bent_pilot wrote:

> Perhaps to you blokes on the right side of the big pond Velos and Nazcas are
> a bit more available for purchase.


Up to a point. There are 2 HP Vel dealers in the UK AFAICT, and there
may be as many as two Nazca bikes in the country... OTOH we're a bit
nearer NL and Germany to go and look at stuff in the flesh (we went to
NL for Roos to test 'bents after she decided that for her the HP Vels
were close but lacking that magical cigar inducing X Factor, and after
the Fiero put the biggest grin on Roos' face she ordered one direct from
Nazca).

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
C

chris

Guest
Many thanks to everyone for the input.
I will have to try and track one down to see it.
Speaking of which, what are the chances that anybody in this group owns a
Speed Machine and lives in southern Wisconsin or northern Chicago/Illinois? ;-)
 
B

Big Red

Guest
I'll be at the races in Northbrook and at the Hostel Shoppe Ralley. I live
about 40 miles west of Chicago.
"chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:f%[email protected]
> Many thanks to everyone for the input.
> I will have to try and track one down to see it.
> Speaking of which, what are the chances that anybody in this group owns a
> Speed Machine and lives in southern Wisconsin or northern
> Chicago/Illinois? ;-)




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C

chris

Guest
On Wed, 11 May 2005 20:27:13 -0500, Big Red wrote:

> I'll be at the races in Northbrook and at the Hostel Shoppe Ralley. I live
> about 40 miles west of Chicago.


If you wouldn't mind writing an email so I could get in touch with you,
you can send one to [email protected]. Notice the clever "REMOVE"
in the email address to deter spam. Not sure if it was needed, but all
the geeks seem to do it, and I don't feel like reading about enlargements
or Britney Spears ;-). When in Rome... etc.
 
B

bent_pilot

Guest
Except for the deluge when you were packing up to leave, what did you think
about the test ride on the Speedmachine?

"chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Wed, 11 May 2005 20:27:13 -0500, Big Red wrote:
>
>> I'll be at the races in Northbrook and at the Hostel Shoppe Ralley. I
>> live
>> about 40 miles west of Chicago.

>
> If you wouldn't mind writing an email so I could get in touch with you,
> you can send one to [email protected]. Notice the clever "REMOVE"
> in the email address to deter spam. Not sure if it was needed, but all
> the geeks seem to do it, and I don't feel like reading about enlargements
> or Britney Spears ;-). When in Rome... etc.





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