HR for recovery?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Risto Varanka, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Most training books tell us the zone below 65% of MHR is for recovery. However, can you use the
    higher zones for recovery as well?

    On quite a few of my easy days, my HR can momentarily go up to my lactate/anaerobic threshold,
    and even over that. I don't keep it there for long periods or do many repetitions... mostly it's
    just random spurts and slowdowns of variable speed. If I do this, the total time of exercise is
    under 30 min.

    Is this useful for recovery? Also, should easy days be concentrated on recovery (and technique), or
    could you use them for maintaining parts of fitness you don't train on the hard days?

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
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  2. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Most training books tell us the zone below 65% of MHR is for recovery. However, can you use the
    > higher zones for recovery as well?
    >
    > On quite a few of my easy days, my HR can momentarily go up to my lactate/anaerobic threshold,
    > and even over that. I don't keep it there for long periods or do many repetitions... mostly it's
    > just random spurts and slowdowns of variable speed. If I do this, the total time of exercise is
    > under 30 min.

    That type of workout is called Fartlek, Swedish for SpeedPlay.

    It is basically a non structured workout where you ride as hard as you like and back off and recover
    as you wish.

    Probably find some information on it by doing a "google" search.

    Prof
    >
    > Is this useful for recovery? Also, should easy days be concentrated on recovery (and technique),
    > or could you use them for maintaining parts of fitness you don't train on the hard days?
    >
    > --
    > Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  3. "Prof. Wilhelm von de Leihavon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > That type of workout is called Fartlek, Swedish for SpeedPlay.
    >

    Ah, geez. THAT's what we've been doing wrong. Swedish, huh?

    Damn. Shoulda read the instructions.
     
  4. Prof. Wilhelm von de Leihavon <[email protected]> wrote:
    :> On quite a few of my easy days, my HR can momentarily go up to my lactate/anaerobic threshold,
    :> and even over that. I don't keep it there for long periods or do many repetitions... mostly it's
    :> just random spurts and slowdowns of variable speed. If I do this, the total time of exercise is
    :> under 30 min.

    : That type of workout is called Fartlek, Swedish for SpeedPlay.

    Yup, it's essentially fartlek. Interestingly enough, I've usually used it for all the other sports
    than biking... and mostly on shortish, easy recovery runs/whatever :) On bike I've mostly done
    constant pace rides for the last few years... because I've stared at the avg speed for a ride. This
    ends now! :^)

    : Probably find some information on it by doing a "google" search.

    Indeed, it seems to be recommended for recovery purposes. See
    http://home.sprynet.com/~holtrun/fartlek.htm for example.

    Assumably easy training with variable, fast paces can loosen up places. So maybe after a long ride
    you can do a fartlek because muscles can get a bit stiff in long exercise? And after interval
    sessions you could do the standard recovery rides in subaerobic/low aerobic zone... just to recover
    the muscles and stuff? Alternating different paces makes psychological sense, too.

    Another use for fartlek could be to prepare you for more formal interval training in the
    early season.

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
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