HRM's

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Racer, Aug 22, 2004.

  1. Racer

    Racer Guest

    Anyone got a view on what is decent/reasonably priced to use whilst cycling?
    Have read a lot about them but don't know which to use.

    Thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 22/8/04 1:49 pm, in article [email protected], "Racer"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Anyone got a view on what is decent/reasonably priced to use whilst cycling?
    > Have read a lot about them but don't know which to use.


    Run tech. 15 quid from Lidl.

    ...d
     
  3. Vivian

    Vivian Guest

    Racer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anyone got a view on what is decent/reasonably priced to use whilst

    cycling?
    > Have read a lot about them but don't know which to use.
    >
    > Thanks
    >

    What's a HRM?

    --
    Vivian
    -------
    "We learned more from a three minute record than we ever learned in school".
    No Surrender
     
  4. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

  5. MSA

    MSA Guest

    In article <BD4E862B.1E067%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > On 22/8/04 5:17 pm, in article [email protected], "Vivian"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > What's a HRM?

    >
    > heart *bom* rate *bom* monitor *bom* *bom* *bom*
    >
    > ..d
    >
    >


    Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed with
    anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the S710,
    you may be happy with a lower model.


    --
    Mark (MSA)
    This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not volume. Some settling
    of contents may have occurred during transmission
     
  6. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    MSA wrote:

    >
    >
    > Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed with
    > anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the S710,
    > you may be happy with a lower model.
    >
    >


    I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!

    --


    Velvet
     
  7. MSA

    MSA Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]in says...
    > MSA wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >
    > > Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed with
    > > anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the S710,
    > > you may be happy with a lower model.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    > useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    > cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!
    >
    >


    Yep! I use mine with the fork sender and a cadence sensor. I download
    all info via infra red. It's a superb piece of kit.


    --
    Mark (MSA)
    This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not volume. Some settling
    of contents may have occurred during transmission
     
  8. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    MSA wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected]in says...
    >
    >>MSA wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed with
    >>>anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the S710,
    >>>you may be happy with a lower model.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    >>useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    >>cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Yep! I use mine with the fork sender and a cadence sensor. I download
    > all info via infra red. It's a superb piece of kit.
    >
    >


    Same here </aol> :)

    Just for info, I have my fork sensor mounted on the BACK wheel. On the
    tube (can't remember what it's called) that runs from the seatpost bit
    down to the rear axle? Is that the seat-stay, or is that the horizontal
    one from the BB to the rear axle?

    Anyway. Cos it's such a small frame, it works fine to the handlebar
    mount from all teh way back there, though only from the same side.
    Which is of slight concern, cos it means that if the sensor is ever
    knocked by something into the spokes, the direction it has to face to
    work (trailing backwards from the tube) means the spokes will drive it
    further into them... rather than rubbing past it and pushing it away.

    But since the primary reason for getting that particular HRM was so I
    could use it on the turbo as well as out on the road, if that's where it
    has to be to work on the back wheel then I'll just have to be careful
    and check it before setting off etc.

    Did get the cadence sensor too, since if I was logging speed/distance I
    figured comparing a cadence graph coudl also be useful, especially since
    it lets me see where I've pushed the bike up a hill ;-)

    The power module thingywhatsit for it (sorry, but I'm ever so slightly
    fuzzy aroudn the edges tonight!) looked very interesting but completely
    OTT for me (as well as being much more money than I could even begin to
    justify spending!). Maybe one day I'll set a goal to attain after which
    I'll save up for it. My first 200km audax? or maybe I'd better make
    that a 300 or 400...

    --


    Velvet
     
  9. Russ

    Russ Guest

    "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > MSA wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > [email protected]in says...
    > >
    > >>MSA wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>
    > >>>Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed with
    > >>>anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the S710,
    > >>>you may be happy with a lower model.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    > >>useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    > >>cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > Yep! I use mine with the fork sender and a cadence sensor. I download
    > > all info via infra red. It's a superb piece of kit.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Same here </aol> :)
    >
    > Just for info, I have my fork sensor mounted on the BACK wheel. On the
    > tube (can't remember what it's called) that runs from the seatpost bit
    > down to the rear axle? Is that the seat-stay, or is that the horizontal
    > one from the BB to the rear axle?
    >
    > Anyway. Cos it's such a small frame, it works fine to the handlebar
    > mount from all teh way back there, though only from the same side.
    > Which is of slight concern, cos it means that if the sensor is ever
    > knocked by something into the spokes, the direction it has to face to
    > work (trailing backwards from the tube) means the spokes will drive it
    > further into them... rather than rubbing past it and pushing it away.
    >
    > But since the primary reason for getting that particular HRM was so I
    > could use it on the turbo as well as out on the road, if that's where it
    > has to be to work on the back wheel then I'll just have to be careful
    > and check it before setting off etc.


    You can up the power of the sender unit from it's current low setting to med
    or high for use on the back wheel so you can mount it however you like. You
    hanve to move a jumper in the sender unit - Instructions sre on the web - do
    a google.

    Russ
     
  10. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Russ wrote:

    > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>MSA wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>[email protected] says...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>MSA wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed with
    >>>>>anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the S710,
    >>>>>you may be happy with a lower model.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    >>>>useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    >>>>cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Yep! I use mine with the fork sender and a cadence sensor. I download
    >>>all info via infra red. It's a superb piece of kit.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Same here </aol> :)
    >>
    >>Just for info, I have my fork sensor mounted on the BACK wheel. On the
    >>tube (can't remember what it's called) that runs from the seatpost bit
    >>down to the rear axle? Is that the seat-stay, or is that the horizontal
    >>one from the BB to the rear axle?
    >>
    >>Anyway. Cos it's such a small frame, it works fine to the handlebar
    >>mount from all teh way back there, though only from the same side.
    >>Which is of slight concern, cos it means that if the sensor is ever
    >>knocked by something into the spokes, the direction it has to face to
    >>work (trailing backwards from the tube) means the spokes will drive it
    >>further into them... rather than rubbing past it and pushing it away.
    >>
    >>But since the primary reason for getting that particular HRM was so I
    >>could use it on the turbo as well as out on the road, if that's where it
    >>has to be to work on the back wheel then I'll just have to be careful
    >>and check it before setting off etc.

    >
    >
    > You can up the power of the sender unit from it's current low setting to med
    > or high for use on the back wheel so you can mount it however you like. You
    > hanve to move a jumper in the sender unit - Instructions sre on the web - do
    > a google.
    >
    > Russ
    >
    >


    Ooh, I had no idea - thanks for that! I'm sure it only needs a very
    tiny boost to work from the other side, given it works reliably from
    it's current position - but I'd like to move it to avoid breaking
    spokes/me if the worst does ever happen and it rotates into the wheel..

    --


    Velvet
     
  11. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Velvet wrote (but wrote wrongly) :


    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    >>> useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    >>> cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!
    >>>



    Actually, it's a 720 I have, not a 710. Not sure if it's just a later
    model, or has other features the 710 doesn't. Might be worth checking.

    --


    Velvet
     
  12. daviddobedoe

    daviddobedoe New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0

    Help me, google for what?
     
  13. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Sun, 22 Aug 2004 13:49:05 +0100, "Racer" <[email protected]> wrote
    (more or less):

    >Anyone got a view on what is decent/reasonably priced to use whilst cycling?
    >Have read a lot about them but don't know which to use.


    I'm using the combo bike-computer/HRM from Aldi, at £15.

    EBC have got an own-brand one for the wrist at £39.99 that they've
    just started selling, at a rate of knots.

    I don't know the full list of features, but it's worth a look at their
    web-site.



    --
    Cheers,
    Euan
    Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr
    Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122
    Smalltalk links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk) http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  14. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    daviddobedoe wrote:


    >
    >
    >
    > Help me, google for what?
    >
    >


    For the instructions on how to up the power of the distance sensor
    transmitter, so it can be mounted on the back wheel of a bike rather
    than the usual mounting point (front fork) for the Polar S720i HRM
    (which has cycling compuytery stuff as well as the HRM stuff).

    In my case, it'd be nice to mount it the other side of the rear wheel,
    so that if it goes into the spokes, they push it back out rather than
    further in.

    I've googled, but though I found the references to the webpage in
    question, it comes back with a 404 error. I've gleaned enough that it's
    a jumper setting and to put it to high power you move it to the outside
    of the jumpers, but to find out if that's enough info to do it, I'd have
    to take my sensor off/apart etc.

    --


    Velvet
     
  15. Russ

    Russ Guest

    "daviddobedoe" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    > Velvet Wrote:
    > > Russ wrote:
    > >
    > > > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > >>MSA wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    > > >>>[email protected] says...
    > > >>>
    > > >>>
    > > >>>>MSA wrote:
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>>Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed

    > > with
    > > >>>>>anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the

    > > S710,
    > > >>>>>you may be happy with a lower model.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it.

    > > VERY
    > > >>>>useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    > > >>>>cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>
    > > >>>
    > > >>>Yep! I use mine with the fork sender and a cadence sensor. I

    > > download
    > > >>>all info via infra red. It's a superb piece of kit.
    > > >>>
    > > >>>
    > > >>
    > > >>Same here </aol> :)
    > > >>
    > > >>Just for info, I have my fork sensor mounted on the BACK wheel. On

    > > the
    > > >>tube (can't remember what it's called) that runs from the seatpost

    > > bit
    > > >>down to the rear axle? Is that the seat-stay, or is that the

    > > horizontal
    > > >>one from the BB to the rear axle?
    > > >>
    > > >>Anyway. Cos it's such a small frame, it works fine to the handlebar
    > > >>mount from all teh way back there, though only from the same side.
    > > >>Which is of slight concern, cos it means that if the sensor is ever
    > > >>knocked by something into the spokes, the direction it has to face

    > > to
    > > >>work (trailing backwards from the tube) means the spokes will drive

    > > it
    > > >>further into them... rather than rubbing past it and pushing it

    > > away.
    > > >>
    > > >>But since the primary reason for getting that particular HRM was so

    > > I
    > > >>could use it on the turbo as well as out on the road, if that's where

    > > it
    > > >>has to be to work on the back wheel then I'll just have to be

    > > careful
    > > >>and check it before setting off etc.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > You can up the power of the sender unit from it's current low setting

    > > to med
    > > > or high for use on the back wheel so you can mount it however you

    > > like. You
    > > > hanve to move a jumper in the sender unit - Instructions sre on the

    > > web - do
    > > > a google.
    > > >
    > > > Russ
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > Ooh, I had no idea - thanks for that! I'm sure it only needs a very
    > > tiny boost to work from the other side, given it works reliably from
    > > it's current position - but I'd like to move it to avoid breaking
    > > spokes/me if the worst does ever happen and it rotates into the
    > > wheel..
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > >
    > > Velvet

    >
    >
    > Help me, google for what?
    >


    Pah! Bloody lazy git I thought but it wasn't quite as easy as I thought it'd
    be

    jumper settings polar HRM speed sender produced this (after a bit of
    reading) - and I knew what I was looking for

    Open the sensor with two
    >screws that you might not immediately see. They are located in two holes in

    the back part of the
    >sensor ( the hollowed out part). Make sure you have the correct Phillips

    screwdriver since they are
    >very small and you don't wan't to start slipping thus damaging the heads.
    >
    >When the screws come out you can pull the sensor apart, be careful with the

    rubber seal, possibly
    >grease it again with silicon or such when remounting.
    >
    >You will see a circuit board sticking out of the outer part. On one side

    there is a jumper and
    >three pins. default the jumper is slid onto the inner pin, low setting. If

    you move it outwards
    >over the two inner pins you have medium setting. Over the two pins closest

    to the edge of the board
    >you have maximum transmission range.
    >
    >If you carefully slide the whole circuit board out of the plastic you will

    also find a battery.

    However that seemed a bit, well like one of those dodgy bits of advice so,
    IIRC the original info was on the forum of the australian polar site so
    going there found me this
    http://www.pursuit-performance.com.au/polar/html/local/faq/faq_speed_cadence.html

    which can't be found on the main Polar site - how stupid is that!

    Anyway
    HTH

    Russ
     
  16. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Velvet
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > MSA wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> [email protected]in says...
    >>
    >>>MSA wrote:
    >>>>Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed
    >>>>with
    >>>>anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the
    >>>>S710, you may be happy with a lower model.
    >>>
    >>>I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    >>>useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    >>>cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!

    >>
    >> Yep! I use mine with the fork sender and a cadence sensor. I
    >> download
    >> all info via infra red. It's a superb piece of kit.

    >
    > Same here </aol> :)


    Bloody hell, I thought the Ergobrain was expensive!

    OK, I'm in the market for instrumentation for my new bike, someone try
    and and explain to me why its worth spending £207 + £35 for the speed
    sensor + £35 for the cadence sensor = £277 total for a jumped-up
    wireless cycle computer.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    'graveyards are full of indispensable people'
     
  17. Russ

    Russ Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > in message <[email protected]>, Velvet
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    > > MSA wrote:
    > >> In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> [email protected]in says...
    > >>
    > >>>MSA wrote:
    > >>>>Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed
    > >>>>with
    > >>>>anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the
    > >>>>S710, you may be happy with a lower model.
    > >>>
    > >>>I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    > >>>useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    > >>>cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!
    > >>
    > >> Yep! I use mine with the fork sender and a cadence sensor. I
    > >> download
    > >> all info via infra red. It's a superb piece of kit.

    > >
    > > Same here </aol> :)

    >
    > Bloody hell, I thought the Ergobrain was expensive!
    >
    > OK, I'm in the market for instrumentation for my new bike, someone try
    > and and explain to me why its worth spending £207 + £35 for the speed
    > sensor + £35 for the cadence sensor = £277 total for a jumped-up
    > wireless cycle computer.


    If you just want instrumentation then it's not - If you want a complete
    training system to maximise performance from training smarter rather than
    training harder then add £10 for sally edwards book explaining how to use it
    then it's the best investment you'll ever make.

    It comes with one speed sensor as standard IIRC.

    Russ
     
  18. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:

    > in message <[email protected]>, Velvet
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >
    >>MSA wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>[email protected] says...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>MSA wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Anything by Polar. If your serious you will only be disappointed
    >>>>>with
    >>>>>anything else (except maybe Ciclosport). I use and swear by the
    >>>>>S710, you may be happy with a lower model.
    >>>>
    >>>>I'll give the S710 a vote, too. That's what I use and love it. VERY
    >>>>useful is the downloading to PC thing, plus it has (if you get the
    >>>>cadence thing for it) all the functions of a bike computer too!
    >>>
    >>>Yep! I use mine with the fork sender and a cadence sensor. I
    >>>download
    >>>all info via infra red. It's a superb piece of kit.

    >>
    >>Same here </aol> :)

    >
    >
    > Bloody hell, I thought the Ergobrain was expensive!
    >
    > OK, I'm in the market for instrumentation for my new bike, someone try
    > and and explain to me why its worth spending £207 + £35 for the speed
    > sensor + £35 for the cadence sensor = £277 total for a jumped-up
    > wireless cycle computer.
    >


    Cos I told myself that it was a reward for actually putting in the hours
    each day in the run up to the London to Cambridge (and that if I was
    doing it, I might as well do it properly and get the most use out of it
    *during* rather than just *after*

    And it meant I could give my mum my old HRM, in the hope it might spur
    her on to get fitter (she had the same problems as the other thread
    regarding with heart rate limits and gyms).

    In my case it's VERY useful to see the graph over time (or distance, if
    I prefer) of what my heart rate is doing, and compare with
    speed/cadence/altitudes (and thus rate of climb etc). Plus, having had
    a few instances where I've nearly feinted with suddenly very low heart
    rates (considering I'd just climbed up a long hill) there was a bit of
    concern as to what it was actually *doing* (the heart, not the monitor)
    sometimes, and it meant I could look back and see, rather than fail to
    remember to look *at the time*.

    And Russ's right. It's a wonderful tool that will do me for years, in
    conjunction with Sally's book, that makes the workouts on the turbo
    interesting, and should see me continue to cycle throughout the nasty
    winter that's already looming far too fast - simply because it adds
    variety and interest to what I'd otherwise do on there. And he's also
    right on the speed sensor. It comes with one by default - but you do
    have to add the cadence sensor.

    If you want *real* OTTness, have a look at adding the power option to it
    (though you then don't use either the included speed sensor OR have to
    buy the cadence sensor...)

    Yes I might be a gadget cyclist, but I figure if that's what keeps me
    going on the bike then I really don't care - it's been worth it's weight
    so far in what it's allowed me to do in the way of preparation - because
    if nothing else it stops me from overdoing it whilst unfit and trying to
    keep up with much much fitter cyclists (and thus inevitably leading to
    problems). I very much doubt that without it I would have gone from a
    personal best of 34 miles last year to 58 this year, nor would I have
    the confidence to now be looking (if I can get the time with work being
    so busy!) to get fit enough to try my first 102km randonee at the end of
    sept!

    --


    Velvet
     
  19. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Velvet
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > In my case it's VERY useful to see the graph over time (or distance,
    > if I prefer) of what my heart rate is doing, and compare with
    > speed/cadence/altitudes (and thus rate of climb etc).  Plus, having
    > had a few instances where I've nearly feinted with suddenly very low
    > heart rates (considering I'd just climbed up a long hill) there was a
    > bit of concern as to what it was actually doing (the heart, not the
    > monitor) sometimes, and it meant I could look back and see, rather
    > than fail to remember to look *at the time*.


    OK, this is what I don't get. Forgive me if I'm an old fogey. Who the
    hell cares what their heart is doing, provided it keeps on doing it?
    What you want to know is how much distance you're covering, and how
    fast you're covering it (and for how much longer you'll be able to
    maintain that speed, and at what rate your speed will decrease as
    tiredness builds).

    I mean, persuade me. I would dearly love not to have to take large
    quantities of rat-poison every day, and not to have to go into the
    doctors' once a fortnight to have my blood viscosity measured. But I
    just don't see what difference knowing how hard my heart was beating
    would make. Cadence, yes, I see that. Altimeter and in particular
    rate-of-climb meter, yes, excellent. Heart rate? WTF? It's a pump. It
    pumps. If it doesn't pump enough oxygen in and enough lactic acid out,
    my legs don't go round so well and my cadence and speed drop. And you
    can usually observe that without any instrumentation at all.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    -- mens vacua in medio vacuo --
     
  20. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 23/8/04 7:39 am, in article
    [email protected], "Velvet"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If you want *real* OTTness, have a look at adding the power option to it
    > (though you then don't use either the included speed sensor OR have to
    > buy the cadence sensor...)


    I thought that would be the playstation version where you can compete
    against your favourite cyclist of yore up the Alpe d' Huez with the PS
    powered by the bike..

    ...d
     
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