hub for 6 speed thread on freewheel (27in wheel)

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by bigchili66, Nov 17, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. bigchili66

    bigchili66 Guest

    i am looking for a hub to work with a 6-speed thread on freewheel for a 27in wheel. I don't know if
    7-speed hubs are compatible or not. please recommend specific manufactuers and models. thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, <[email protected]> wrote:
    >i am looking for a hub to work with a 6-speed thread on freewheel for a 27in wheel. I don't know if
    >7-speed hubs are compatible or not.

    Yes, they are the same (and the wheel size is irrelevant to the hub).
     
  3. Two things are critical when choosing a hub:

    1. The over-locknut-width must be the same as the frame in which the wheel will be used. Most
    frames which came with 6 speed freewheels were spaced 126mm between the rear dropouts. I doubt
    that many (if any) rear hubs are made in this width any more but lots of used ones are around
    and some new-old-stock (NOS) ones. Most currently produced hubs are 130mm OLN width (road bikes)
    or 135mm OLN width (mountain bikes). If the 130 or 135 width hub is of the cup and cone type
    then it can be narrowed by removing spacers and cutting or grinding off the excess axle length.
    A second solution is to have your bike frame spread to 130 or 135 width.

    2. The second critical thing is that the hub must be drilled for the same number of spokes as the
    rim you intend to use. Most 6 speed wheels were built with 36 spokes though some had 40 or 48 or
    (rarely) 32 spokes.

    The rim diameter is unimportant when choosing a hub. I think your best bet is to inquire after a
    good used hub at a bike shop. Alternatively, you can make a WTB (Want To Buy) posting on
    Rec.Bicycles.Marketplace.

    Some good brands of thread on rear hubs are:

    Specialized Campagnolo Older Shimano Suntour Suzue

    You can get currently produced thread on hubs from manufacturers like Phil Wood. These are of superb
    quality but very expensive.

    Another good option is to look at the website for First Flight Bicycles. They have both NOS and used
    components at good prices.

    Bob Taylor
     
  4. bigchili66

    bigchili66 Guest

    On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 23:55:35 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>i am looking for a hub to work with a 6-speed thread on freewheel for a 27in wheel. I don't know
    >>if 7-speed hubs are compatible or not.
    >
    >Yes, they are the same (and the wheel size is irrelevant to the hub).

    Thanks
     
  5. bigchili66

    bigchili66 Guest

    On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 18:39:37 -0600 (CST), [email protected] (Robert Taylor) wrote:

    >Two things are critical when choosing a hub:
    >
    >1. The over-locknut-width must be the same as the frame in which the wheel will be used. Most
    > frames which came with 6 speed freewheels were spaced 126mm between the rear dropouts. I doubt
    > that many (if any) rear hubs are made in this width any more but lots of used ones are around
    > and some new-old-stock (NOS) ones. Most currently produced hubs are 130mm OLN width (road
    > bikes) or 135mm OLN width (mountain bikes). If the 130 or 135 width hub is of the cup and cone
    > type then it can be narrowed by removing spacers and cutting or grinding off the excess axle
    > length. A second solution is to have your bike frame spread to 130 or 135 width.
    >
    >2. The second critical thing is that the hub must be drilled for the same number of spokes as the
    > rim you intend to use. Most 6 speed wheels were built with 36 spokes though some had 40 or 48
    > or (rarely) 32 spokes.
    >
    >The rim diameter is unimportant when choosing a hub. I think your best bet is to inquire after a
    >good used hub at a bike shop. Alternatively, you can make a WTB (Want To Buy) posting on
    >Rec.Bicycles.Marketplace.
    >
    >Some good brands of thread on rear hubs are:
    >
    >Specialized Campagnolo Older Shimano Suntour Suzue
    >
    >You can get currently produced thread on hubs from manufacturers like Phil Wood. These are of
    >superb quality but very expensive.
    >
    >Another good option is to look at the website for First Flight Bicycles. They have both NOS and
    >used components at good prices.
    >
    >Bob Taylor

    Thank you very much.
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > i am looking for a hub to work with a 6-speed thread on freewheel for a 27in wheel. I don't know
    > if 7-speed hubs are compatible or not. please recommend specific manufactuers and models. thanks

    Any particular drilling or quality?

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/camp1034.html

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  7. Dan Brussee

    Dan Brussee Guest

    On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 18:19:48 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 18:39:37 -0600 (CST), [email protected] (Robert Taylor) wrote:
    >
    >>Two things are critical when choosing a hub:
    >>
    >>1. The over-locknut-width must be the same as the frame in which the wheel will be used. Most
    >> frames which came with 6 speed freewheels were spaced 126mm between the rear dropouts. I doubt
    >> that many (if any) rear hubs are made in this width any more but lots of used ones are around
    >> and some new-old-stock (NOS) ones. Most currently produced hubs are 130mm OLN width (road
    >> bikes) or 135mm OLN width (mountain bikes). If the 130 or 135 width hub is of the cup and cone
    >> type then it can be narrowed by removing spacers and cutting or grinding off the excess axle
    >> length. A second solution is to have your bike frame spread to 130 or 135 width.
    >>
    >>2. The second critical thing is that the hub must be drilled for the same number of spokes as the
    >> rim you intend to use. Most 6 speed wheels were built with 36 spokes though some had 40 or 48
    >> or (rarely) 32 spokes.
    >>
    >>The rim diameter is unimportant when choosing a hub. I think your best bet is to inquire after a
    >>good used hub at a bike shop. Alternatively, you can make a WTB (Want To Buy) posting on
    >>Rec.Bicycles.Marketplace.
    >>
    >>Some good brands of thread on rear hubs are:
    >>
    >>Specialized Campagnolo Older Shimano Suntour Suzue
    >>
    >>You can get currently produced thread on hubs from manufacturers like Phil Wood. These are of
    >>superb quality but very expensive.
    >>
    >>Another good option is to look at the website for First Flight Bicycles. They have both NOS and
    >>used components at good prices.
    >>
    >>Bob Taylor
    >
    >Thank you very much.

    If your interested, I have a SunTour Cyclone sealed bearing rear hub in Very Good used condition you
    can have for $10 plus shipping. It has 126mm OLN dimention and is drilled for a 32 hole rim.
     
  8. meb

    meb New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Are you implying that recent thread-on HUBS have differing widths than old threadon hubs?

    If so by how much?

    Was the hub width changed-to accomodate 7 speed freewheels at 126mm?

    There are lots of low end 6 speed freewheel bikes. Are those continuing with NOS hubs, new manufacturings of old style hubs or have they changed hub widths?

    The implications of that raises another question. Were the hubs differing width between hubs intended for 5 cog freewheels vs. 6 cog freewheels?
     
  9. The width of the hub hbody has not necessarily changed much but the overall width between the
    locknuts has changed from 120mm (hubs meant for 5 speed freewheels) to 126mm (hubs meant for 6 and 7
    speed freewheels) to 130 and 136 mm (hubs that can be used with 5, 6, 7, 8, or 9 speed freewheels).
    In the case of the 126mm OLN width hub, the extra 6 mm was all placed on the drivetrail (right) side
    in order to make room for the 6th cog. Some 7 speed freewheels would work on a hub meant for a 6
    speed freewheel (best example is Suntour 7 speed freewheel) and some 7 speed freewheels are too wide
    to work on hubs meant for 6 speed freewheels (Sachs 7 speed freewheels for example).

    !30m OLN hubs and 135 OLN hubs usually accommodate cassettes rather than
    thread-on freewheels and the extra width is intended to reduce wheel dish as well as to provide
    space for as many as 9 or 10 cogs.

    Inexpensive production bicycles still come with 6 speed thread-on freewheels and I suppose it's
    likely that they would be 126mm OLN width. If I were going to the expense of having a wheel built I
    would want to use hubs of better quality than these are likely to be.

    Bob Taylor
     
  10. bigchili66

    bigchili66 Guest

    To All: Thank you for your input. I believe I have enough information to go forward.

    Alonzo
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...