Hybrid Bike comments/suggestions!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Mee Too, Mar 24, 2005.

  1. Mee Too

    Mee Too Guest

    I am looking at buying a Hybrid Bike for riding around town, and commuting
    to work. One thing I am really looking at is a light weight bike that is
    durable enough for some trail riding, and the ability to ride up steep paved
    roads fairly easily. I live in a mountainous area, and have a 2 mile ride up
    hill, that can be difficult for many people to even walk up, yet alone ride
    a bike up.

    I have found two bike that could fit these requirements without breaking the
    bank.

    1) Kona Dew Deluxe, I kinda like the granny gear of the Shimano CS-HG40-8
    cluster, and the Sun MZ 14 Rims appear to be better quality than the WTB's
    on the Gary Fisher.

    2) Gary Fisher Utopia, this bike has alot of updated parts, but I am not
    real familiar with the Bontrager Parts, are they better, or worse than whats
    comes on the Kona? It is a real fun ride, and I am starting to lean towards
    this bike more!

    My question is, what do you experts think would be the best ride?

    Thanks,,, SW
     
    Tags:


  2. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 24 Mar 2005 13:40:58 -0700,
    <[email protected]>, "Mee Too"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My question is, what do you experts think would be the best ride?
    >
    >Thanks,,, SW


    The Dew Deluxe has a rigid fork, is ~$150 less, comes with toe clips
    and straps and it's black. I'm sold.

    How often do think you'll really need that heavier bouncy fork that
    could complicate mounting fenders?
    --
    zk
     
  3. Bill H.

    Bill H. Guest

    Bontrager is okay in my limited experience with them. I have some
    Bontrager cranks, a seatpost, and a handlebar on my GF bike. They work
    well so far.

    You say "occasional trail riding" so I reply with "what kinds of
    trails?" and "define occasional". If it's maybe once a month or so on
    mild offroad trails that aren't very technical, go rigid. You'll give
    up some comfort on bumpy trails without it, but you can probably get
    by. And as the other poster pointed out, a suspension fork is usually
    much heavier than a rigid fork.

    -Bill H.
     
  4. Mee Too

    Mee Too Guest

    Would not be much trail riding, since I have a Hard Tail mountain bike for
    that. Just that some of the local paved access trail have portions that are
    dirt/gravel, and I don't want to have to worry about damaging a wheel or
    such.

    ....SW

    "Bill H." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Bontrager is okay in my limited experience with them. I have some
    > Bontrager cranks, a seatpost, and a handlebar on my GF bike. They work
    > well so far.
    >
    > You say "occasional trail riding" so I reply with "what kinds of
    > trails?" and "define occasional". If it's maybe once a month or so on
    > mild offroad trails that aren't very technical, go rigid. You'll give
    > up some comfort on bumpy trails without it, but you can probably get
    > by. And as the other poster pointed out, a suspension fork is usually
    > much heavier than a rigid fork.
    >
    > -Bill H.
    >
     
  5. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 13:27:27 -0800, Zoot Katz wrote:

    > The Dew Deluxe has a rigid fork, is ~$150 less, comes with toe clips and
    > straps and it's black. I'm sold.


    Agreed. If you're one to count "weight points" ;) for the price of that
    fork in weight points you can have fenders, a full lighting system and a
    rack.

    All of which you should have on a town bike anyway. That's what the
    remaining $150's for. :p
     
  6. Don't sweat the gravel.

    I do gravel on my road bike (700x25's) with no problem.

    The hybrid will take it easily in stride.

    Personally, I can't stand the feel of "suspension" on a hybrid (my wife
    has one). To me it is like riding in an old Buick Roadmaster from the
    50's.
     
  7. Bontrager select wheels are great on my Lemond. Not out of true in two
    years.
     
  8. Pat Lamb

    Pat Lamb Guest

    Colorado Bicycler wrote:
    > Don't sweat the gravel.
    >
    > I do gravel on my road bike (700x25's) with no problem.
    >
    > The hybrid will take it easily in stride.


    It really depends on the size of the gravel. 1/4" gravel is no problem
    on almost any tire. 2" gravel, well, I haven't ridden anything with
    less than four large tires that feels safe, if not comfortable.

    Pat
     
  9. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 12:53:22 -0600, Pat Lamb wrote:

    > 1/4" gravel is no problem on
    > almost any tire. 2" gravel,


    2" gravel!?

    At what point do they just become "rocks"?

    Btw, I find I can ride dirt roads just fine with a 28mm tire--but with
    gravel, anything over pea sized--the more float the better.
     
  10. I did one inch gravel earlier this week, successfully, on 700x25's.

    Just depends on your riding skill, I guess!

    (I have never seen 2 inch "gravel?")
     
  11. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    maxo wrote:

    > On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 12:53:22 -0600, Pat Lamb wrote:
    >
    >
    >> 1/4" gravel is no problem on
    >>almost any tire. 2" gravel,

    >
    >
    > 2" gravel!?
    >
    > At what point do they just become "rocks"?


    3" to 12" nominal diameter is a cobble; greater than 12" diameter is a
    boulder.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Earth (Downstate Illinois, North of Forgottonia)
     
  12. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 19:03:15 -0600, Tom Sherman wrote:

    > maxo wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 12:53:22 -0600, Pat Lamb wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> 1/4" gravel is no problem on
    >>>almost any tire. 2" gravel,

    >>
    >>
    >> 2" gravel!?
    >>
    >> At what point do they just become "rocks"?

    >
    > 3" to 12" nominal diameter is a cobble; greater than 12" diameter is a
    > boulder.



    Oh great, I make a wiseass post and somebody has to slap me around with
    dirty rotten facts.

    LOL :D
     
  13. Patrick Lamb

    Patrick Lamb Guest

    On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 20:07:15 GMT, maxo <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 12:53:22 -0600, Pat Lamb wrote:
    >
    >> 1/4" gravel is no problem on
    >> almost any tire. 2" gravel,

    >
    >2" gravel!?
    >
    >At what point do they just become "rocks"?


    Fair question. When I ride to one of the LBSs, I like to sneak in the
    back way (it faces a major road/highway), and the parking lot in the
    back has huge gravel. The other place I've seen it is on unpaved
    mountain "roads," perhaps better called overgrown bear tracks. My
    guess is the engineers keep going up on gravel size until they find
    something that won't wash off the steeper sections.

    Pat

    Email address works as is.
     
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