Hybrid bike questions.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by asahitoro, Feb 26, 2003.

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  1. asahitoro

    asahitoro Guest

    I've been looking at a Trek 7700 and am curious of other's opinions of the bike. For $1100 it comes
    pretty well loaded up with only a few things I'd change(seat, add disc brakes and a few other small
    things). Can this bike handle some rough stuff? I'd be riding it mostly on pavement with an
    occassional unpaved, sometimes rough trail. Can a good hybrid bike handle this or are these bikes
    sort of 'jack of all trades, master of none'? My other choice in the was the Trek 6700 which is
    built more for off-road. Should I opt for something like that and change it some(gearing, tires,
    etc.) to handle some road riding? Thanks for any input,

    Scott
     
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  2. asahitoro

    asahitoro Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, jmk <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Hmmmm... I went the hybrid route in the early 90's. I found the hybrid to be of a jack of all
    > >trades and master of none. On the road it was serviceable at best, and off road it couldn't
    > >handle much more than dirt roads or lime-stone trails.
    >
    > If you've got good balance and bike handling skills, a hybrid can handle some pretty decent single
    > track trails, including rocks and ruts and mud. You have to ride it really slowly, though, to
    > clear the rough stuff and plan on walking alot more than your mountain bike buddies. On rough
    > trails, a mountain bike will be alot more fun, allowing you to ride faster and with better
    > control, both up and down hills.
    >
    > On pavement, a regular road bike will also be much faster (for the same energy output) than a
    > hybrid. This is especially true on hilly terrain.
    >
    > Hybrids are best for people taking short rides on relatively mild terrain who don't care about
    > speed or distance. There are alot of people who take an hour ride on Sundays. For everyone else,
    > get a real bike or three.
    >
    > Ken

    Thanks for the replies,

    I may only ride 4-6 hours a week but most of the places I ride are 70% pavement/30% dirt trail(all
    in the same ride). I'm more worried about a road bike getting beat to crap on a ride then a mountain
    bike not being fast or smooth enough. I have a spare pair of 02' Rockshox Judy SL forks that I can
    swapout the included Metros on the 7700 for to beef it up some. I could also beef up the rims/tires
    some later(although the ones included on the 7700 seem sufficient for my purposes). That 7700 looks
    like a heck of a lot of bike for the $. I have another mountain bike(Giant CFM 4) that I can abuse
    if I have a more rough day of riding ahead. I agree it's probably best to have a different
    individual bike for each different type of riding but what if most of your ridng is a mix of
    types(paved/dirt) each time? Maybe a hybrid with a lean towards the mountain bike side would be best
    for that situation.

    Again, I appreciate the input,

    Scott
     
  3. no

    no Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, jmk <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Hmmmm... I went the hybrid route in the early 90's. I found the hybrid to be of a jack of all
    >trades and master of none. On the road it was serviceable at best, and off road it couldn't handle
    >much more than dirt roads or lime-stone trails.

    If you've got good balance and bike handling skills, a hybrid can handle some pretty decent single
    track trails, including rocks and ruts and mud. You have to ride it really slowly, though, to clear
    the rough stuff and plan on walking alot more than your mountain bike buddies. On rough trails, a
    mountain bike will be alot more fun, allowing you to ride faster and with better control, both up
    and down hills.

    On pavement, a regular road bike will also be much faster (for the same energy output) than a
    hybrid. This is especially true on hilly terrain.

    Hybrids are best for people taking short rides on relatively mild terrain who don't care about speed
    or distance. There are alot of people who take an hour ride on Sundays. For everyone else, get a
    real bike or three.

    Ken
     
  4. Joel Mayes

    Joel Mayes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    > I've been looking at a Trek 7700 and am curious of other's opinions of the bike. For $1100 it
    > comes pretty well loaded up with only a few things I'd change(seat, add disc brakes and a few
    > other small things). Can this bike handle some rough stuff? I'd be riding it mostly on pavement
    > with an occassional unpaved, sometimes rough trail. Can a good hybrid bike handle this or are
    > these bikes sort of 'jack of all trades, master of none'? My other choice in the was the Trek 6700
    > which is built more for off-road. Should I opt for something like that and change it some(gearing,
    > tires, etc.) to handle some road riding? Thanks for any input,
    >
    > Scott

    G'day Scott;

    I'm a very happy hybrid rider I do 130 - 150 k's weekdays and try to fit in a 30 - 40 k ride on the
    weekend mostly onroad commuting durring the week and trail riding on the weekends, I can easily
    maintain 25+ kph's with two fully loaded paniers on the road and the sprint upto 35+ if a need to,
    so I do get passed by serious commuters on road bikes but it is fast enough for me to feel safe in
    the trafic. and it get handle a bit of offroad and gutter jumping if I need to.

    It works for me, YMMV

    Cheers

    Joel
    --
    First they ignore you, | Gandhi, being prophetic about Linux. then they laugh at | then they fight
    you, | Joel Mayes then you win. | Sourcemage GNU/Linux
     
  5. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, jmk <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >Hmmmm... I went the hybrid route in the early 90's. I found the hybrid to be of a jack of all
    > > >trades and master of none. On the road it was serviceable at best, and off road it couldn't
    > > >handle much more than dirt roads or lime-stone trails.
    > >
    > > If you've got good balance and bike handling skills, a hybrid can handle some pretty decent
    > > single track trails, including rocks and ruts and mud. You have to ride it really slowly,
    > > though, to clear the rough stuff and plan on walking alot more than your mountain bike buddies.
    > > On rough trails, a mountain bike will be alot more fun, allowing you to ride faster and with
    > > better control, both up and down hills.
    > >
    > > On pavement, a regular road bike will also be much faster (for the same energy output) than a
    > > hybrid. This is especially true on hilly terrain.
    > >
    > > Hybrids are best for people taking short rides on relatively mild terrain who don't care about
    > > speed or distance. There are alot of people who take an hour ride on Sundays. For everyone else,
    > > get a real bike or three.
    > >
    > > Ken
    >
    > Thanks for the replies,
    >
    > I may only ride 4-6 hours a week but most of the places I ride are 70% pavement/30% dirt trail(all
    > in the same ride). I'm more worried about a road bike getting beat to crap on a ride then a
    > mountain bike not being fast or smooth enough. I have a spare pair of 02' Rockshox Judy SL forks
    > that I can swapout the included Metros on the 7700 for to beef it up some. I could also beef up
    > the rims/tires some later(although the ones included on the 7700 seem sufficient for my purposes).
    > That 7700 looks like a heck of a lot of bike for the $. I have another mountain bike(Giant CFM 4)
    > that I can abuse if I have a more rough day of riding ahead. I agree it's probably best to have a
    > different individual bike for each different type of riding but what if most of your ridng is a
    > mix of types(paved/dirt) each time? Maybe a hybrid with a lean towards the mountain bike side
    > would be best for that situation.
    >
    > Again, I appreciate the input,
    >
    > Scott

    A hybrid can be a fine choice for a city rider. Mine has 700 x 35 tires, light weight (compared to
    my old mtn bike at least), fairly fast, mounts a rear and front rack & fenders. Goes faster than my
    mtn bike too. All this makes it a nice "general" ride. Good for commuting, shopping or what have
    you. This type is fine for bike paths, streets and decent trails. Hybrids are not mountain bikes and
    are not sold as such. You might find a hybrid makes a good all rounder for you. Like usual, YMMV!
    Best regards, Bernie
     
  6. Art

    Art Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I've been looking at a Trek 7700 and am curious of other's opinions of the bike. For $1100 it
    > comes pretty well loaded up with only a few things I'd change(seat, add disc brakes and a few
    > other small things). Can this bike handle some rough stuff? I'd be riding it mostly on pavement
    > with an occassional unpaved, sometimes rough trail. Can a good hybrid bike handle this or are
    > these bikes sort of 'jack of all trades, master of none'? My other choice in the was the Trek 6700
    > which is built more for off-road. Should I opt for something like that and change it some(gearing,
    > tires, etc.) to handle some road riding? Thanks for any input,
    >
    > Scott

    Here's my $.02 as a 2002 Trek 7700 owner. As others have noted, hybrids can be good all around
    bikes. This bike cruises nicely, takes bumps in stride and offers a decent ride. I don't know what
    you mean by rough stuff, but I wouldn't take it beyond an unpaved road or dirt path. On the road it
    offers a quick, not fast, ride. If you only can have one bike, this might be the one.

    Art
     
  7. The 7700 is an excellent machine, but you can't put your existing mountain bike fork on it, since
    mountain bikes are almost always 26" (559 by x) vs
    700c (622by x) on the 7700. The other issue is that, in rough stuff, you're going to have trouble
    steering out of ruts. If the trails are relatively smooth, a 7700 will handle it great.

    There *is* yet another alternative now appearing. The 700c mountain bike. Fisher has a couple of
    models, and these would allow you to but el-beefo tires on it for off road, and faster tires for
    street use. The advantage this has over a standard 26" mountain bike is if you want to use it
    extensively for road use at some point, since the larger tires will effectively have larger gearing.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReaction.com

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, jmk <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > > >Hmmmm... I went the hybrid route in the early 90's. I found the hybrid
    to
    > > >be of a jack of all trades and master of none. On the road it was serviceable at best, and off
    > > >road it couldn't handle much more than
    dirt
    > > >roads or lime-stone trails.
    > >
    > > If you've got good balance and bike handling skills, a hybrid can handle some pretty decent
    > > single track trails, including rocks and ruts and
    mud.
    > > You have to ride it really slowly, though, to clear the rough stuff and plan on walking alot
    > > more than your mountain bike buddies. On rough
    trails,
    > > a mountain bike will be alot more fun, allowing you to ride faster and
    with
    > > better control, both up and down hills.
    > >
    > > On pavement, a regular road bike will also be much faster (for the same energy output) than a
    > > hybrid. This is especially true on hilly terrain.
    > >
    > > Hybrids are best for people taking short rides on relatively mild
    terrain
    > > who don't care about speed or distance. There are alot of people who
    take
    > > an hour ride on Sundays. For everyone else, get a real bike or three.
    > >
    > > Ken
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the replies,
    >
    > I may only ride 4-6 hours a week but most of the places I ride are 70% pavement/30% dirt trail(all
    > in the same ride). I'm more worried about a road bike getting beat to crap on a ride then a
    > mountain bike not being fast or smooth enough. I have a spare pair of 02' Rockshox Judy SL forks
    > that I can swapout the included Metros on the 7700 for to beef it up some. I could also beef up
    > the rims/tires some later(although the ones included on the 7700 seem sufficient for my purposes).
    > That 7700 looks like a heck of a lot of bike for the $. I have another mountain bike(Giant CFM 4)
    > that I can abuse if I have a more rough day of riding ahead. I agree it's probably best to have a
    > different individual bike for each different type of riding but what if most of your ridng is a
    > mix of types(paved/dirt) each time? Maybe a hybrid with a lean towards the mountain bike side
    > would be best for that situation.
    >
    > Again, I appreciate the input,
    >
    > Scott
     
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