Hybrid Help?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by geemike, Jan 16, 2005.

  1. geemike

    geemike Guest

    Last year I rode a bike for the first time in 25 years. I bought
    a Raleigh M-80 as an impulse purchase while buying my daughter a
    bike for her birthday.

    It was a surprise to me that I really got into riding. From June
    to November I put about 900 miles on it (Catseye computer stopped
    working in Oct). I ride paved roads only. My typical ride is 15
    miles, I coast much of the first half and have to get the
    elevation back after the turnaround. So I get a pretty good
    workout. On weekends I like to punch that out to a 25 mile ride,
    time permitting. I had slicks put on the Raleigh in September,
    which reduced road drag considerably.


    This year I'd like to ratchet my riding up a notch, and will
    purchase a new bike to do so.
    I think I want a hybrid bike, as I'm 5'5" and 225 lbs (FAT). So
    that whole "upright riding position" thing will really be a
    benefit for me. The LBS I've worked with is recommending a Trek
    Pilot 2.1:
    http://www2.trekbikes.com/en/Bikes/Road/Performance_Road/Pilot/Pilot_21/index.php

    They won't have these in stock for two weeks, so I haven't had a
    chance to spin one around the parking lot. They will mount an
    extra set of hand brakes on the horizontal part of the bar and
    probably replace the hb riser with a more upright one, as they did
    on my Raleigh.

    Fit will be a primary consideration in my purchase, as will build
    quality and component set. My budget will be limited to $1500.

    Anyone have opinions on this bike, and suggestions for competing
    bikes in my price range?

    Thanks

    Mike G
     
    Tags:


  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "geemike" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:p[email protected]:
    > The LBS I've worked with is recommending a Trek
    > Pilot 2.1:
    > http://www2.trekbikes.com/en/Bikes/Road/Performance_Road/Pilot/Pilot_21/in
    > dex.php


    Trek Pilot is new this year, so you're not going to get many experienced
    recommendations. By definition, hybrid bikes are compromises. Different
    models of bikes have different levels of compromise. You need to test ride a
    bunch to see what fits your body and your riding style. None will be best for
    everyone.
     
  3. jj

    jj Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 01:03:20 +0000, Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"geemike" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:p[email protected]:
    >> The LBS I've worked with is recommending a Trek
    >> Pilot 2.1:
    >> http://www2.trekbikes.com/en/Bikes/Road/Performance_Road/Pilot/Pilot_21/index.php

    >
    >Trek Pilot is new this year, so you're not going to get many experienced
    >recommendations. By definition, hybrid bikes are compromises. Different
    >models of bikes have different levels of compromise. You need to test ride a
    >bunch to see what fits your body and your riding style. None will be best for
    >everyone.
     
  4. > This year I'd like to ratchet my riding up a notch, and will purchase a
    > new bike to do so.
    > I think I want a hybrid bike, as I'm 5'5" and 225 lbs (FAT). So that
    > whole "upright riding position" thing will really be a benefit for me.
    > The LBS I've worked with is recommending a Trek Pilot 2.1:
    > http://www2.trekbikes.com/en/Bikes/Road/Performance_Road/Pilot/Pilot_21/index.php
    >
    > They won't have these in stock for two weeks, so I haven't had a chance to
    > spin one around the parking lot. They will mount an extra set of hand
    > brakes on the horizontal part of the bar and probably replace the hb riser
    > with a more upright one, as they did on my Raleigh.


    With an appropriate stem, you may not need to have the extra brake levers
    across the front of the handlebar. Ideally, you should feel very comfortable
    with your hands across the top of the shift/brake levers, and with modern
    brakes, you'll find you have no need to go down into the drops (and a
    less-comfortable position) for enough stopping power, even at 225lbs.

    I'm somewhat puzzled with the fascination with extra brake levers. In many
    cases, I think it's a bass-ackwards solution to the problem of handlebars
    with too much forward reach. A more reasonable cure? A bar with less forward
    reach. We're talking real rocket science here!

    So, rather than add those extra brake levers, you might ask that they sub
    the "flat-top" handlebars for a standard Bontrager bar. The reach will be
    considerably less, and you'll be considerably more comfortable. In my humble
    opinion, of course!

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "geemike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Last year I rode a bike for the first time in 25 years. I bought a
    > Raleigh M-80 as an impulse purchase while buying my daughter a bike for
    > her birthday.
    >
    > It was a surprise to me that I really got into riding. From June to
    > November I put about 900 miles on it (Catseye computer stopped working in
    > Oct). I ride paved roads only. My typical ride is 15 miles, I coast much
    > of the first half and have to get the elevation back after the turnaround.
    > So I get a pretty good workout. On weekends I like to punch that out to a
    > 25 mile ride, time permitting. I had slicks put on the Raleigh in
    > September, which reduced road drag considerably.
    >
    >
    > This year I'd like to ratchet my riding up a notch, and will purchase a
    > new bike to do so.
    > I think I want a hybrid bike, as I'm 5'5" and 225 lbs (FAT). So that
    > whole "upright riding position" thing will really be a benefit for me.
    > The LBS I've worked with is recommending a Trek Pilot 2.1:
    > http://www2.trekbikes.com/en/Bikes/Road/Performance_Road/Pilot/Pilot_21/index.php
    >
    > They won't have these in stock for two weeks, so I haven't had a chance to
    > spin one around the parking lot. They will mount an extra set of hand
    > brakes on the horizontal part of the bar and probably replace the hb riser
    > with a more upright one, as they did on my Raleigh.
    >
    > Fit will be a primary consideration in my purchase, as will build quality
    > and component set. My budget will be limited to $1500.
    >
    > Anyone have opinions on this bike, and suggestions for competing bikes in
    > my price range?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Mike G
    >
     
  5. geemike

    geemike Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > So, rather than add those extra brake levers, you might ask that
    > they sub the "flat-top" handlebars for a standard Bontrager bar.
    > The reach will be considerably less, and you'll be considerably
    > more comfortable. In my humble opinion, of course!


    Hmmm. That's worthy of consideration. What about the Carbon fork
    and seat stays? When married to an aluminum frame, do these
    improve ridability or are they just for there for marketing
    purposes?

    Mike G
     
  6. geemike

    geemike Guest

    I
    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "geemike" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:p[email protected]:
    >> The LBS I've worked with is recommending a Trek
    >> Pilot 2.1:
    >> http://www2.trekbikes.com/en/Bikes/Road/Performance_Road/Pilot/Pilot_21/in
    >> dex.php

    >
    > Trek Pilot is new this year, so you're not going to get many
    > experienced
    > recommendations. By definition, hybrid bikes are compromises.
    > Different
    > models of bikes have different levels of compromise. You need
    > to test ride a
    > bunch to see what fits your body and your riding style. None
    > will be best for
    > everyone.


    Can you suggest a mfr. with a good linup of hybrids?

    Mike
     
  7. Let's see, you say you are looking at a hybrid and want opinions on
    what Trek refers to as a "performance road" bike. The Pilot isn't the
    kind of bike you take out for 15 mile rides. When was the last time
    you even rode a "10 speed" style bike? Have you started fitting
    yourself for spandex yet, because without it you're going to find the
    Pilot extrememly uncomfortable.

    I don't see what is wrong with your current setup. A traditional
    hybrid would give you a more upright sitting position over your M-80,
    but I really doubt it would improve your distance or speed. A real
    road bike would allow you to ride further and faster, but would also be
    more uncomfortable. And an uncomfortable bike will not be ridden.

    Since you say you want to ratchet up your riding, why don't you do that
    with your current bike? Are you going so fast that you're running out
    of gears? Do you lose confidence when cornering? Is there a reason
    you can't pedal in the first half of your ride where you normally
    coast?

    Also, the carbon components should theoretically improve ride comfort
    but given your inexperience it is doubtful you would notice. The same
    goes for components in the price range you are talking about.
     
  8. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 17:41:58 -0700, geemike wrote:

    > Anyone have opinions on this bike, and suggestions for competing
    > bikes in my price range?


    Well, I just want to give you kudos for getting a drop bar bike. Your LBS
    has done the right thing in setting you up with a taller stem--I think
    you'll LOVE the extra hand positions and will want to ride longer with the
    added comfort.

    Since you're a bit heavier, have you given some thought to a sturdier ride
    (good for even lightweights that like durability)? I'm not saying the Trek
    is bad at all, but you might like the durability and versatility of a bike
    like the Jamis Nova, or a Surly.

    http://www.jamisbikes.com/bikes/05_nova.html

    I'm not saying get a Jamis, per se, but suggesting that it might be nice
    to have a ride that you can put some wider rubber on and other
    accessories, and punish a bit more, vs. just a dedicated roadie bike.

    With the trek you're probably limited to a 28c wide tire (a perfect tire
    width for most conditions, it's what I ride) but wouldn't it be fun to be
    able to switch from some super skinnies to a floatier 37c wide tire and
    perhaps ride some unpaved trails? You can even just check the sales on
    line and get a cheap 2nd set of wheels, tires and cassette for $150 or so
    and be able to switcheroo depending on your mood.

    If indeed what you want is a fun swift dedicated sunny day bike, the Trek
    looks like a fine ride. :)

    Do also think about yer butt. Most stock saddles suck. So you might want
    to set aside 50-100 bucks for a nicer one that fits your particulars.
     
  9. > What about the Carbon fork and seat stays? When married to an aluminum
    > frame, do these improve ridability or are they just for there for
    > marketing purposes?


    Both. Carbon damps vibration (you could say it doesn't carry a tune), and
    also drops a bit of weight without sacrificing strength. And, of course,
    carbon is the material of the day, favored by Lance etc., so it obviously
    has marketing significance as well.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "geemike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> So, rather than add those extra brake levers, you might ask that they sub
    >> the "flat-top" handlebars for a standard Bontrager bar. The reach will be
    >> considerably less, and you'll be considerably more comfortable. In my
    >> humble opinion, of course!

    >
    > Hmmm. That's worthy of consideration. What about the Carbon fork and
    > seat stays? When married to an aluminum frame, do these improve
    > ridability or are they just for there for marketing purposes?
    >
    > Mike G
    >
    >
     
  10. > Let's see, you say you are looking at a hybrid and want opinions on
    > what Trek refers to as a "performance road" bike. The Pilot isn't the
    > kind of bike you take out for 15 mile rides. When was the last time
    > you even rode a "10 speed" style bike? Have you started fitting
    > yourself for spandex yet, because without it you're going to find the
    > Pilot extrememly uncomfortable.


    That's not entirely fair; he did say that he does 25 mile rides on weekends,
    and a road bike will definitely have advantages on rides of that length.
    Also, a new bike isn't just about how you use one now, it's also about the
    dream of how you'll ride in the future.

    > I don't see what is wrong with your current setup. A traditional
    > hybrid would give you a more upright sitting position over your M-80,
    > but I really doubt it would improve your distance or speed. A real
    > road bike would allow you to ride further and faster, but would also be
    > more uncomfortable. And an uncomfortable bike will not be ridden.


    I strongly disagree with the premise that a road bike is going to be less
    comfortable than a hybrid. The multiple hand positions afforded by a
    standard road bar do a lot to reduce the type of discomfort some feel from a
    handlebar that offers only one position. Road bikes get a bad rap, from a
    comfort standpoint, because most are set up with too long and too low a
    stem, something that, in most cases, can be dealt with fairly easily. The
    Pilot that he's looking at has a considerably higher starting position for
    the handlebar than a standard road bike, for what it's worth.

    > Since you say you want to ratchet up your riding, why don't you do that
    > with your current bike? Are you going so fast that you're running out
    > of gears? Do you lose confidence when cornering? Is there a reason
    > you can't pedal in the first half of your ride where you normally
    > coast?
    >
    > Also, the carbon components should theoretically improve ride comfort
    > but given your inexperience it is doubtful you would notice. The same
    > goes for components in the price range you are talking about.


    If there's a difference in ride comfort, why does it take an "experienced"
    rider to notice it? I would argue that a less strong rider is probably going
    to benefit more from something that adds comfort than someone who's so fit
    that they're hardly making contact with their saddle (because their legs are
    so strong they're basically pushing the cyclist "up") and they're likely to
    have a much more robust upper body, which deals better with road shock etc.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  11. geemike

    geemike Guest

    John poses some brutally honest questions, but I'll answer them to
    help you folks help me:


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Let's see, you say you are looking at a hybrid and want opinions
    > on
    > what Trek refers to as a "performance road" bike. The Pilot
    > isn't the
    > kind of bike you take out for 15 mile rides.


    I have ridden 35 miles, and would like to find myself seriously
    considering 50 milers during the next 6 months.

    >When was the last time you even rode a "10 speed" style bike?


    I've never so much as sat on one.

    >Have you started fitting
    > yourself for spandex yet, because without it you're going to
    > find the
    > Pilot extrememly uncomfortable.


    Good point. Haven't yet found any spandex yet to fit this potato
    body of mine. Know of a source? If not I think that's an
    underserved market. There's got to be plenty of fat people trying
    to lose weight on a bike.

    > I don't see what is wrong with your current setup. A
    > traditional
    > hybrid would give you a more upright sitting position over your
    > M-80,
    > but I really doubt it would improve your distance or speed. A
    > real
    > road bike would allow you to ride further and faster, but would
    > also be
    > more uncomfortable. And an uncomfortable bike will not be
    > ridden.


    Hmmm. That's a pretty good point. But I'd really like to reduce
    road friction. Wonder if I can buy some skinny tires/wheels to
    fit my Raleigh. Remember it's got disc brakes.

    > Since you say you want to ratchet up your riding, why don't you
    > do that
    > with your current bike? Are you going so fast that you're
    > running out
    > of gears?


    Only on steep downgrades. But 33mph is as fast as I want to do
    with that cheap Judy fork. The bike actually feels pretty fidgety
    at that speed.

    >Do you lose confidence when cornering?


    No, I really enjoy cornering agressively, and do so often.

    > Is there a reason you can't pedal in the first half of your ride
    > where you normally
    > coast?


    Well, I do. I like to try to see how fast I can complete the
    ride. I guess going downhill seems like coasting.

    > Also, the carbon components should theoretically improve ride
    > comfort
    > but given your inexperience it is doubtful you would notice.


    Agreed. But I would like a nice new toy and have the Wife's
    permission to get it :)

    Mike G
     
  12. geemike

    geemike Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    <snip reply>

    Thanks for posing some good counterpoints.
     
  13. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 00:25:20 -0700, geemike wrote:

    > Hmmm. That's a pretty good point. But I'd really like to reduce
    > road friction. Wonder if I can buy some skinny tires/wheels to
    > fit my Raleigh. Remember it's got disc brakes.


    You can certainly fit some lighter tires for very very cheap and see how
    that feels. Sales abound this time of year--I wouldn't be surprised if you
    could pick up a set of reasonably fast rubber for a twenty (usd).

    If you've got the dough and upgrading to a new toy will keep you
    exercising, then do it by all means of course.

    Or perhaps you might want to spend your bike allowance on other stuff like
    bike clothing to make riding more comfy (especially real bike shoes) or
    some racks and fenders for the Raleigh...
     
  14. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "geemike" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:eek:[email protected]:
    > Can you suggest a mfr. with a good linup of hybrids?


    I don't think any one brand is best for hybrids. Most of the major road bike
    brands and many of the mountain bike brands make decent hybrid bikes.
     
  15. You have bike lust and the only known cure is to buy the shiniest most
    expensive thing available. Luckily, you have a bike salesman here that
    can make all sorts of promises. Don't limit yourself to just $1500.
    Later in the year when you're riding 200 miles/week you'll really
    wished you had gone for that Madone.
     
  16. jj

    jj Guest

    On 17 Jan 2005 01:17:02 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >You have bike lust and the only known cure is to buy the shiniest most
    >expensive thing available. Luckily, you have a bike salesman here that
    >can make all sorts of promises. Don't limit yourself to just $1500.
    >Later in the year when you're riding 200 miles/week you'll really
    >wished you had gone for that Madone.


    Mmm, mmm, bike lust.

    jj
    (like: mmm, mmm, cookie)
     
  17. pam_in_sc

    pam_in_sc Guest

    geemike wrote:

    > I have ridden 35 miles, and would like to find myself seriously
    > considering 50 milers during the next 6 months.


    Consider buying a touring bike (a sturdy road bike). It sounds like you
    are really getting into biking, and if you buy the hybrid you will be
    wanting a more serious bike in another year. Keep your old bike for
    toodling around town and rainy days. I bought way ahead of where I was:
    an Orbea Aspin when I was first getting back into riding almost a year
    ago, and it has been a major inspiration to go further and faster. I
    got an adjustable stem and set the handlebars fairly high and back. The
    advantage of a somewhat bent over position is that your hands take some
    of your weight instead of the seat, and if you have a lot of weight that
    may actually be more important. Try out different saddles and find a
    comfortable one.

    I've lost 55 lbs. in the last 15 months, though I lost the larger part
    of that before I got into biking. I still felt a little awkward when I
    started because my thighs hit my belly, but someone advised me not to
    worry about it, it would go away with time. And it has.

    > Good point. Haven't yet found any spandex yet to fit this potato
    > body of mine. Know of a source? If not I think that's an
    > underserved market. There's got to be plenty of fat people trying
    > to lose weight on a bike.


    For women's plus size athletic clothing there is:
    http://www.junonia.com/ Performance has some mens bike shorts up to
    size 3XL Fit varies a lot, which may make buying by mail seem too
    risky, but some bike shorts are so stretchy they will fit a wide range.
    You might want to buy lycra/spandex shorts, as they are all stretchy,
    and wear them under your own baggy shorts or sweats if you can't bear
    the way you look. I wore spandex from the start, figured I wanted
    comfort more than I cared how I looked.

    Pam
     
  18. In my opinion, as far as I can tell, most of the hybrids have mountain bike
    gearing, or close to it.
    Thus you run out of gears trying to upshift as you go faster on those easy
    downhill stretches anyway.
    In this case going faster than about 15 to 17mph (depending on the bike) has
    you pedaling like crazy, so you start coasting instead.
    I wound up riding a bunch of different bikes, from Specialized, Cannondale,
    Trek, etc. I sorta liked the Cannondale BadBoy the most (Trek's 7200-7300
    were really nice too) but it had the Mountain Bike gearing, which sucks on
    the road, and it cost a lot more than I expected, especially since I would
    have to modify it anyway. Then you have the problem of everyone wanting to
    steal it too.
    I am older, big, fat guy, plus I have a bad back as well. Also I have
    problems with my hands geting too numb after a while, detracting from the
    overall fun of it.
    I wound up buying a Raliegh SC30 comfort bike amazingly enough, to use over
    my Diamondback MTB just for some of those reasons. Higher riding position,
    less pressure on my hands causing numbness. Suspension and a larger seat for
    more comfortabe riding. All those other features looked like too much
    marketing hype to me (carbon fibre, zertz inserts, ultra light frames). The
    vast majority of bikes are made for people that are 5'5" in size and 140
    pounds tops, thus a ultralight frame will likely break on me.
    It also has a fully adjustable stem, so I can adjust the handlebars most
    anyway want to, and it is easy to replace with a straight bar as well.

    Unfortunately I thought the SC-30 had something like the Shimano Megarange
    cassette (as their internet specs stated it) with 11 to 34 teeth sprockets,
    instead, in reality, it has the more common sprockets 14 to 34 teeth. So it
    tops out at about 16 mph on those downhill stretches, but since my old MTB
    tops out at about 12-13mph this is still a improvement.
    I plan to replace the rear cassette with a 11-34 Megarange model, that 11
    tooth sprocket would let me go up to about 20mph or a bit over. A regular
    road bike with a 12 tooth rear sprocket (and a 52 tooth front chainring)
    would go about 21mph+ so this change should work well.
    I want to replace the front big chainring with a 52 tooth one later as well,
    but this is going to be harder as I have to change out the entire crank as
    well, since the inexpensive crank and chainring are all one piece all spot
    welded together. The quick change wheels are nice as I can switch out for
    the road slicks quickly too with another full set of wheels too. That is
    another thing to consider if you like the disc brakes.
    Anyway, it is more cost effective for me to upgrade the inexpensive Raleigh
    SC30 than to get a fancy more expensive bike and still have to upgrade it as
    well.
    Right now it looks like all the town commuter like hybrid bikes all have
    mountain bike gearing, when they should haven something more like both road
    and mountain bike gearing. Currently the SC30 allows me to use the middle
    chainring now for flat stretches whereas on the mountain bike I had to use
    the largest chainring.
    I would seriously try a test ride where you can determine how well the bikes
    do on those slight downhill stretches and on those long flat streches.
    Also get down there on your knees and count the sprocket teeth and see what
    they really have there, the specs may be in error.


    "geemike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Last year I rode a bike for the first time in 25 years. I bought a
    > Raleigh M-80 as an impulse purchase while buying my daughter a bike for
    > her birthday.
    >
    > It was a surprise to me that I really got into riding. From June to
    > November I put about 900 miles on it (Catseye computer stopped working in
    > Oct). I ride paved roads only. My typical ride is 15 miles, I coast much
    > of the first half and have to get the elevation back after the turnaround.
    > So I get a pretty good workout. On weekends I like to punch that out to a
    > 25 mile ride, time permitting. I had slicks put on the Raleigh in
    > September, which reduced road drag considerably.
    >
    >
    > This year I'd like to ratchet my riding up a notch, and will purchase a
    > new bike to do so.
    > I think I want a hybrid bike, as I'm 5'5" and 225 lbs (FAT). So that
    > whole "upright riding position" thing will really be a benefit for me.
    > The LBS I've worked with is recommending a Trek Pilot 2.1:
    > http://www2.trekbikes.com/en/Bikes/Road/Performance_Road/Pilot/Pilot_21/index.php
    >
    > They won't have these in stock for two weeks, so I haven't had a chance to
    > spin one around the parking lot. They will mount an extra set of hand
    > brakes on the horizontal part of the bar and probably replace the hb riser
    > with a more upright one, as they did on my Raleigh.
    >
    > Fit will be a primary consideration in my purchase, as will build quality
    > and component set. My budget will be limited to $1500.
    >
    > Anyone have opinions on this bike, and suggestions for competing bikes in
    > my price range?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Mike G
    >
     
  19. geemike

    geemike Guest

    "Earl Bollinger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "The vast majority of bikes are made for people that are 5'5"
    > in size and
    > 140 pounds tops". That is just plain silly, not to mention
    > wrong.
    >
    > It isn't when you go to the bike shop looking for apparel and
    > special clothes and the shops only have those sizes on hand, and
    > they are reluctant to order "big" sizes for you as if it doesn't
    > fit, then they are stuck with the item(s).
    > It's really irritating to see a jersey marked XXXL and it really
    > is for a 5'9" skinny person.
    > Or riding shorts with a 30 inch waist marked as being XL.
    > Then there are the shoes, when is the last time any bike shop
    > ever had real


    Like I said, if there isn't a web site offering bike wear for the
    obese there should be one. It's damned embarassing to go to the
    bike store to try to find spandex stuff when all the help is,
    well, "intimidatingly fit". It would be cool if you could pop off
    some measurements to an online shop with a reasonable chance of
    success of having them fill the order.

    > American size 12 shoe in stock?


    That's my next problem, where to find a 9.5 EEE bike shoe.
    Haven't looked yet. Anyone have any suggestions?


    Finally, I want to thank those who have responded to this thread.
    No one has come out and screamed that the Trek Pilot 2.1 is likely
    to be a poor value or is unlikely to stand up to the riding I will
    do.
    This would be my fourth bike purchase from this bike shop, so I
    can wiggle a bit of a discount out of them. If it seems to fit me
    well, I think I'll buy it.

    Mike G
     
  20. Patrick Lamb

    Patrick Lamb Guest

    On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 00:25:20 -0700, "geemike"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Good point. Haven't yet found any spandex yet to fit this potato
    >body of mine. Know of a source? If not I think that's an
    >underserved market. There's got to be plenty of fat people trying
    >to lose weight on a bike.


    Performance house brand, or Voler (velowear.com), have big sizes. I
    like bibs -- the waistband doesn't roll down.

    Back to the earlier point about high stems. Ride 'em! I put an
    adjustable (high) stem on my touring bike, and then went to a Nitto
    Technomic last year. I talked daughter #2 into a road bike year
    before last, as long as she got the shop to flip the stem up and make
    sure she was comfortable. Daughter #1 got herself a touring bike last
    fall on clearance; again, the shop (REI this time) flipped the stem,
    moved it above the spacers they had left on, and she's comfortable
    with her new bike. Both girls seem to like riding their bikes, and
    will go with me on longer rides than they used to when they had
    mountain bikes or borrowed Mom's hybrid.

    Notice the common thread? We got our bikes set up so we're
    comfortable on them. We ride them.

    Let the "stem police" ride whatever they want. You just have fun.

    Pat

    Email address works as is.
     
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