Hybrid tyres

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Drs, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. Drs

    Drs Guest

    My hybrid came with Cheng Shin OEM 700x38 tyres and they've got to go (I
    guess the shop had to compromise somewhere). Just about all of my riding is
    on bitumen, except maybe for the gravel bike path around the lake near where
    I live, and I live in a city with a real winter so wet weather handling is
    an issue. I'm doing my homework and I've come up with a list of tyres that
    I'd like opinions on, for or against:

    700x28 Continental Sport 1000 350g 700x28 Continental Top Touring 2000 430g 700x28 Continental Ultra
    Gatorskin 320g 700x28 IRC Road Winner II Duro 290g 700x30 IRC Tandem Duro 305g 700x28 Michelin
    Dynamic 380g 700x28 Michelin Transworld City 390g 700x28 Schwalbe Marathon 510g 700x28 Vittoria
    Randonneur "double shielded" 490g 700x28 Vittoria Zaffiro 350g

    Right now I'm leaning towards the IRCs largely because of their weight.

    --

    A: Top-posters.
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  2. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > My hybrid came with Cheng Shin OEM 700x38 tyres and they've got to go (I guess the shop had to
    > compromise somewhere). Just about all of my riding is on bitumen, except maybe for the gravel bike
    > path around the lake near where I live, and I live in a city with a real winter so wet weather
    > handling is an issue. I'm doing my homework and I've come up with a list of tyres that I'd like
    > opinions on, for or against:
    >
    > 700x28 Continental Sport 1000 350g

    I really like these on my Tourer (though I use the 25mm size). I can't comment on the others because
    I haven't tried them.

    > 700x28 Continental Top Touring 2000 430g 700x28 Continental Ultra Gatorskin 320g 700x28 IRC Road
    > Winner II Duro 290g 700x30 IRC Tandem Duro 305g 700x28 Michelin Dynamic 380g 700x28 Michelin
    > Transworld City 390g 700x28 Schwalbe Marathon 510g 700x28 Vittoria Randonneur "double shielded"
    > 490g 700x28 Vittoria Zaffiro 350g
    >
    > Right now I'm leaning towards the IRCs largely because of their weight.
    >
    >

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the newsgroups if possible).
     
  3. Araby

    Araby Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My hybrid came with Cheng Shin OEM 700x38 tyres and
    > they've got to go (I guess the shop had to compromise
    > somewhere). Just about all of my
    riding is
    > on bitumen, except maybe for the gravel bike path around
    > the lake near
    where
    > I live, and I live in a city with a real winter so wet
    > weather handling
    is
    > an issue. I'm doing my homework and I've come up with a
    > list of tyres
    that
    > I'd like opinions on, for or against:
    >
    > 700x28 Continental Sport 1000 350g 700x28 Continental
    > Top Touring 2000 430g 700x28 Continental Ultra Gatorskin
    > 320g 700x28 IRC Road Winner II Duro 290g 700x30 IRC
    > Tandem Duro 305g 700x28 Michelin Dynamic 380g 700x28
    > Michelin Transworld City 390g 700x28 Schwalbe Marathon
    > 510g 700x28 Vittoria Randonneur "double shielded" 490g
    > 700x28 Vittoria Zaffiro 350g
    >
    > Right now I'm leaning towards the IRCs largely because
    > of their weight.

    I've had bad experience with severe sidewall cracking on
    two IRC's; viz: 26 x 1.5 "Smoothy" and 20 X 1.125 Roadlite
    EX's. On the other hand I've had a couple of cheap Cheng
    Shin 26 X 1.5 semi slicks on a touring equipped MTB for
    several years with no problems -not even a puncture!

    How important is weight to you?

    All the best,

    Roy
     
  4. Drs

    Drs Guest

    araby <[email protected]> wrote in message eOk2c.163524$Qg7.-
    [email protected]

    [...]

    > How important is weight to you?

    It seems to me all I ever do is add weight to the bike. If I
    can reasonably take some weight off I would like to do so.
    After all, the difference between 510g (Scwalbe Marathon)
    and 290g (IRC Road Winner II Duro) may not seem like much
    but it's 220g more per tyre I have to pedal around over who
    knows how many thousands of kilometres.

    OTOH, the shop where I bought my bike has the Radonneurs
    (490g) discounted and will waive the fitting fee if I get it
    done at the same time as my scheduled service. :)

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two
    hours of bloody, barbarous torture in gloating detail is
    considered indicia of religious piety, whereas a mere second
    gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for outraged
    apoplexy." Betty Bowers,
    http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  5. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sun, 7 Mar 2004 08:02:46 +1100, "DRS"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> How important is weight to you?
    >
    >It seems to me all I ever do is add weight to the bike. If
    >I can reasonably

    Same here. :)

    >take some weight off I would like to do so. After all, the
    >difference between 510g (Scwalbe Marathon) and 290g (IRC
    >Road Winner II Duro) may not seem like much but it's 220g
    >more per tyre I have to pedal around over who knows how
    >many thousands of kilometres.

    That weight savings is nearly equal to a set of Planet Bike
    Freddy full coverage fenders with mud flaps, or a rear rack,
    or any of a million other items you might hang on the bike
    (per your comment about adding weight). A pound is nothing
    to sneeze at, especially when it's as inexpensive as a set
    of tires that you need to buy anyway.

    >OTOH, the shop where I bought my bike has the Radonneurs
    >(490g) discounted and will waive the fitting fee if I get
    >it done at the same time as my scheduled service. :)

    By "fitting fee", do you mean that if you bought other tires
    from them, they would charge you to mount them while you've
    got it in for other service? That sounds a bit out of line.

    Any comment from the LBS people here? Would you charge for
    mounting a tire bought at your shop while already charging
    for some other service?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  6. Drs

    Drs Guest

    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]
    > On Sun, 7 Mar 2004 08:02:46 +1100, "DRS"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:

    [...]

    >> take some weight off I would like to do so. After all,
    >> the difference between 510g (Scwalbe Marathon) and 290g
    >> (IRC Road Winner II Duro) may not seem like much but it's
    >> 220g more per tyre I have to pedal around over who knows
    >> how many thousands of kilometres.
    >
    > That weight savings is nearly equal to a set of Planet
    > Bike Freddy full coverage fenders with mud flaps, or a
    > rear rack, or any of a million other items you might hang
    > on the bike (per your comment about adding weight). A
    > pound is nothing to sneeze at, especially when it's as
    > inexpensive as a set of tires that you need to buy anyway.

    Yep, 440g is pretty close to a pound.

    >> OTOH, the shop where I bought my bike has the Radonneurs
    >> (490g) discounted and will waive the fitting fee if I get
    >> it done at the same time as my scheduled service. :)
    >
    > By "fitting fee", do you mean that if you bought other
    > tires from them, they would charge you to mount them while
    > you've got it in for other service? That sounds a bit out
    > of line.

    Ok, my bad. The service is free, part of the warranty on
    the bike. Please don't beat up on my local bike shop, I
    like them. :) Normally there's a fitting fee if you only
    buy the tyres.

    Anyway, does anybody know anything about the Randonneurs?
    Apparently they're fairly new and I can't find reviews on
    them anywhere. http://www.vittoria.com/index3.asp?lingua=en
    then Products > City Trekking.

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two
    hours of bloody, barbarous torture in gloating detail is
    considered indicia of religious piety, whereas a mere second
    gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for outraged
    apoplexy." Betty Bowers,
    http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  7. "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My hybrid came with Cheng Shin OEM 700x38 tyres and
    > they've got to go (I guess the shop had to compromise
    > somewhere). Just about all of my riding
    is
    > on bitumen, except maybe for the gravel bike path around
    > the lake near
    where
    > I live, and I live in a city with a real winter so wet
    > weather handling is an issue. I'm doing my homework and
    > I've come up with a list of tyres
    that
    > I'd like opinions on, for or against:

    Have you looked at the Avocet Cross II's? I have those
    (700x38C size) on my Shogun hybrid, and I've been happy
    with them.

    -- Paul
     
  8. Drs

    Drs Guest

    Paul A. Steckler <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]
    > "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> My hybrid came with Cheng Shin OEM 700x38 tyres and
    >> they've got to go (I guess the shop had to compromise
    >> somewhere). Just about all of my riding is on bitumen,
    >> except maybe for the gravel bike path around the lake
    >> near where I live, and I live in a city with a real
    >> winter so wet weather handling is an issue. I'm doing my
    >> homework and I've come up with a list of tyres that I'd
    >> like opinions on, for or against:
    >
    > Have you looked at the Avocet Cross II's? I have those
    > (700x38C size) on my Shogun hybrid, and I've been happy
    > with them.

    They're nice and light at 350g (Cross IIK 700x28) but it's
    hard to find anyone here in Oz who actually sells them. The
    list I gave are all tyres I know I can get. I'm also not
    sure I want or need a true "cross" tyre. 99% of my riding is
    on bitumen - I live in an area that's very popular with
    cyclists because of the quality and extent of bike paths and
    bike friendly roads, and as I said before, the closest I
    come to off-road riding is the gravel bike path around the
    lake near where I live, which is why there's a number of
    road tyres in the list.

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two
    hours of bloody, barbarous torture in gloating detail is
    considered indicia of religious piety, whereas a mere second
    gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for outraged
    apoplexy." Betty Bowers,
    http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  9. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Sun, 7 Mar 2004 09:23:31 +1100, "DRS" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Anyway, does anybody know anything about the Randonneurs?
    >Apparently they're fairly new and I can't find reviews on
    >them anywhere. http://www.vittoria.com/index3.asp?lingua=en
    >then Products > City Trekking.

    I'll jump into this thread for a moment-

    I had the Randonneurs on a city bike. Bianchi Volpe used for
    commuting. The shop told me that they were popular with
    commuters and messengers. They were the right size so I
    tried them.

    I was very unimpressed with their ride quality. Very dead no
    matter what the pressure. And for some reason I never
    figured out, I could almost feel them fighting me when
    accelerating. Hard to explain, know. I have some 700 gram
    tires on a 26" commuter and they don't feel anywhere near as
    hard to accelerate as the Randonneurs were.

    If you need lots of puncture resistance and ride quality is
    secondary.... uh, tertiary? then go for them. Other than
    that, I would not recommend them.
     
  10. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in
    messagnews:<[email protected]>...
    > Paul A. Steckler <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > [email protected]
    > > "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >> My hybrid came with Cheng Shin OEM 700x38 tyres and
    > >> they've got to go (I guess the shop had to compromise
    > >> somewhere). Just about all of my riding is on bitumen,
    > >> except maybe for the gravel bike path around the lake
    > >> near where I live, and I live in a city with a real
    > >> winter so wet weather handling is an issue. I'm doing
    > >> my homework and I've come up with a list of tyres that
    > >> I'd like opinions on, for or against:
    > >
    Are those knobbies or like that? I did well with Cheng Shin
    Nylon's 700 x 35 front and back for about 3 years. They are
    not knobby, just simple "street" type tread, but tough and
    long lasting. Had to replace the rear only because the
    sidewall got cut while riding on railway ballast. BTW the
    replacement tire lasted only one winter and was clearly done
    in. It was a cheapie, but not worth using. I ordered
    another Cheng Shin. BTW the originals were also OEM on
    my Marin hybrid.

    Regards, Bernie
     
  11. Alan Acock

    Alan Acock Guest

    The Continental Ultra Gatorskin are a great compromise for
    a road bike. They have reasonably good protection without
    being as rock like as most of the Kevlar belted tires.
    Anything that makes a tire tough is going to have some
    adverse influence on the road feel. If you are commuting on
    rough roads with glass, etc. you might want to get a
    tougher tire, but if you have reasonable roads the
    Gatorskin is great.

    Alan Acock "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > My hybrid came with Cheng Shin OEM 700x38 tyres and
    > they've got to go (I guess the shop had to compromise
    > somewhere). Just about all of my riding
    is
    > on bitumen, except maybe for the gravel bike path around
    > the lake near
    where
    > I live, and I live in a city with a real winter so wet
    > weather handling is an issue. I'm doing my homework and
    > I've come up with a list of tyres
    that
    > I'd like opinions on, for or against:
    >
    > 700x28 Continental Sport 1000 350g 700x28 Continental Top
    > Touring 2000 430g 700x28 Continental Ultra Gatorskin 320g
    > 700x28 IRC Road Winner II Duro 290g 700x30 IRC Tandem Duro
    > 305g 700x28 Michelin Dynamic 380g 700x28 Michelin
    > Transworld City 390g 700x28 Schwalbe Marathon 510g 700x28
    > Vittoria Randonneur "double shielded" 490g 700x28 Vittoria
    > Zaffiro 350g
    >
    > Right now I'm leaning towards the IRCs largely because of
    > their weight.
    >
    > --
    >
    > A: Top-posters.
    > Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  12. Drs

    Drs Guest

    Alan Acock <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]_s54
    > The Continental Ultra Gatorskin are a great compromise for
    > a road bike. They have reasonably good protection without
    > being as rock like as most of the Kevlar belted tires.
    > Anything that makes a tire tough is going to have some
    > adverse influence on the road feel. If you are commuting
    > on rough roads with glass, etc. you might want to get a
    > tougher tire, but if you have reasonable roads the
    > Gatorskin is great.

    They look very cool but they seem to polarise people. The
    reviews at sites like www.roadbikereview.com vary wildly
    from love to hate with no inbetween. I've had it suggested
    by one experienced rider that Continentals are particularly
    susceptible to even moderate drops in pressure. IOW, if you
    keep them at 120psi they're virtually bullet-proof but the
    moment they drop to say 100psi, which they tend to do quite
    quickly, they become highly vulnerable to punctures. He only
    half-jokingly suggested the recommended pressure for Contis
    should be 120psi - 120psi.

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two
    hours of bloody, barbarous torture in gloating detail is
    considered indicia of religious piety, whereas a mere second
    gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for outraged
    apoplexy." Betty Bowers,
    http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  13. Drs

    Drs Guest

    Dan Daniel <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]

    [Randonneurs]

    > I was very unimpressed with their ride quality. Very dead
    > no matter what the pressure. And for some reason I never
    > figured out, I could almost feel them fighting me when
    > accelerating. Hard to explain, know. I have some 700 gram
    > tires on a 26" commuter and they don't feel anywhere near
    > as hard to accelerate as the Randonneurs were.

    Could that be because of their low pressures - 60-70psi -
    is not high enough to compensate for their narrow width, do
    you think?

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two
    hours of bloody, barbarous torture in gloating detail is
    considered indicia of religious piety, whereas a mere second
    gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for outraged
    apoplexy." Betty Bowers,
    http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  14. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Mon, 8 Mar 2004 08:32:16 +1100, "DRS" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Dan Daniel <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >[email protected]
    >
    >[Randonneurs]
    >
    >> I was very unimpressed with their ride quality. Very dead
    >> no matter what the pressure. And for some reason I never
    >> figured out, I could almost feel them fighting me when
    >> accelerating. Hard to explain, know. I have some 700 gram
    >> tires on a 26" commuter and they don't feel anywhere near
    >> as hard to accelerate as the Randonneurs were.
    >
    >Could that be because of their low pressures - 60-70psi -
    >is not high enough to compensate for their narrow width, do
    >you think?

    I tried higher pressures and they just turned into bouncing
    bricks. I have no problem ignoring labels like 'max
    pressure' :) There was just something about those tires and
    my riding that weren't meant to be together.
     
  15. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > araby <[email protected]> wrote in message eOk2c.163524$Qg-
    > [email protected]
    >
    > [...]
    >
    > > How important is weight to you?
    >
    > It seems to me all I ever do is add weight to the bike. If
    > I can reasonably take some weight off I would like to do
    > so. After all, the difference between 510g (Scwalbe
    > Marathon) and 290g (IRC Road Winner II Duro) may not seem
    > like much but it's 220g more per tyre I have to pedal
    > around over who knows how many thousands of kilometres.

    I don't see any reason to buy such heavy tires. I've used
    the IRC tires, they're very nice, and very inexpensive
    (~$12). I also like Panaracer tires, the Pasela is similar
    to the Road Winner. Avocets are a bit nicer (better casing),
    but they've become a bit pricey and can be hard to find.
     
  16. Drs

    Drs Guest

    Peter Cole <[email protected]> wrote in
    message [email protected]_s01

    [...]

    > I don't see any reason to buy such heavy tires. I've used
    > the IRC tires, they're very nice, and very inexpensive
    > (~$12). I also like

    That would be the non-Kevlar version, surely?

    > Panaracer tires, the Pasela is similar to the Road Winner.
    > Avocets are a bit nicer (better casing), but they've
    > become a bit pricey and can be hard to find.

    I sent an email to Schwalbe about the weight of the Marathon
    700x28 (510g) and Marathon Slick 700x30 (500g). Here's the
    bulk of the (very swift) response:

    "You are right if you say our Marathon tyres are mostly
    heavier than other high performance tyres. Reason for this
    is, that the Marathons are made for long life, low wear and
    safe riding. All tyres you are mentioning are light weight
    skin tyres with thin tread and without sidewall rubber. The
    Marathon, as well as Marathon Slick are very strong due to a
    special sidewall rubber film reinforcement and long lasting
    because of a thicker tread with special compounds. I think
    this is a key for our success all over Europe, as bicycles
    purpose here is mostly everydays use. We can of course also
    provide real lightweight tyres. For example our Stelvio 28-
    622 is only 325g with Kevlar breaker. Please be advised,
    that the TPI's mentioned by Continental can not be compared
    with TPI values from other manufacturers. Conti adds up the
    TPI's of all carcass layers of one tyre. If we would do so,
    our Marathon would have 150 TPI whereas Marathon Slick would
    be 201 TPI. Stelvio is at least 335 TPI as there are two
    additional carcass layers (overall 5) for puncture
    resistance."

    It's interesting what he says about the way Conti
    calculate their TPI. And Schwalbe do claim 6,000 to
    12,000km for the Marathon!

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two
    hours of bloody, barbarous torture in gloating detail is
    considered indicia of religious piety, whereas a mere second
    gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for outraged
    apoplexy." Betty Bowers,
    http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  17. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Peter Cole <[email protected]> wrote
    > in message [email protected]_s01
    >
    > [...]
    >
    > > I don't see any reason to buy such heavy tires. I've
    > > used the IRC tires, they're very nice, and very
    > > inexpensive (~$12). I also like
    >
    > That would be the non-Kevlar version, surely?

    Nashbar has the "IRC Road Winner II Duro Tire" for $12.95. I
    think it has a Kevlar belt (I would prefer it without). They
    also have the "Panaracer Pasela Road Tire" (no belt) for the
    same price. Both are pretty nice tires for the money. The
    Pasela TG has a belt for a little more money. The Avocets
    can be had for ~$25, and are somewhat nicer. All are pretty
    high quality Japanese tires.

    > I sent an email to Schwalbe about the weight of the
    > Marathon 700x28 (510g) and Marathon Slick 700x30 (500g).
    > Here's the bulk of the (very swift) response:
    >
    > "You are right if you say our Marathon tyres are mostly
    > heavier than other high performance tyres. Reason for
    > this is, that the Marathons are made for long life, low
    > wear and safe riding. All tyres you are mentioning are
    > light weight skin tyres with thin tread and without
    > sidewall rubber.

    I would rather use a tire with less weight and lower
    rolling resistance, I think most of them are durable
    enough. If you're staying on pavement, "skin wall" (as
    opposed to "gum wall") tires are more than adequate. I have
    cut a sidewall or 2, a tragedy on a $50 tire, but worth the
    risk on a $13 one.
     
  18. Drs

    Drs Guest

    Peter Cole <[email protected]> wrote in
    message [email protected]_s04

    [...]

    > Nashbar has the "IRC Road Winner II Duro Tire" for $12.95.
    > I think it has a Kevlar belt (I would prefer it without).
    > They also have the "Panaracer Pasela Road Tire" (no belt)
    > for the same price. Both are pretty nice tires for the
    > money. The Pasela TG has a belt for a little more money.

    $24.95 at Nashbar.

    > The Avocets can be had for ~$25, and are somewhat nicer.
    > All are pretty high quality Japanese tires.

    Which Avocets? The Cross IIK?

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two
    hours of bloody, barbarous torture in gloating detail is
    considered indicia of religious piety, whereas a mere second
    gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for outraged
    apoplexy." Betty Bowers,
    http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  19. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Peter Cole <[email protected]> wrote
    > in message [email protected]_s04
    >
    > [...]
    >
    > > Nashbar has the "IRC Road Winner II Duro Tire" for
    > > $12.95. I think it has a Kevlar belt (I would prefer it
    > > without). They also have the "Panaracer Pasela Road
    > > Tire" (no belt) for the same price. Both are pretty nice
    > > tires for the money. The Pasela TG has a belt for a
    > > little more money.
    >
    > $24.95 at Nashbar.
    >
    > > The Avocets can be had for ~$25, and are somewhat nicer.
    > > All are pretty high quality Japanese tires.
    >
    > Which Avocets? The Cross IIK?

    No, those are pretty heavy tires also. I was thinking of the
    regular Avocet slicks, not usually carried by Nashbar.
    Harris Cyclery always has them. They also have an even
    higher grade, similar tire: the Roly-Poly (Harris also
    carries the Paselas). I haven't tried the R-P's, but I like
    the Avocets a lot for fast/long rides, the RW's or Paselas
    for more utilitarian bikes.
     
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