Hybrid vs MTB

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Macca, May 16, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Macca

    Macca Guest

    hi all...

    wondering if you can help. Am in the market for a new bike after some kind person stole
    the last one!

    not to worry as my last bike was a real cheapy mountain bike!

    looking back at my riding habits, I see that I spend most of my time - 90% -on the road (tarmac or
    asphalt to you Americans ;)

    it occurs to me that th big chunky tires of a MTB are not the best if this forms the bulk of
    my riding.

    therefore I'm starting to think a hyrbid bike might be best (those with the skinnier tyres with a
    bit of tread).. but am worried it wont be up to the job should I want to take it onto somethign a
    bit rougher and more off road. Is it possible to stick grippier tyres on these things when needed?

    alternatively is it possible for example tobuy a standard MTB, and swap the wheels for a set with
    thinner tyres as and when I need them?

    Just wondering if one option is much better than the other...

    help! (yes.. am a bit of a newbie looking for guidance :)
     
    Tags:


  2. Rich

    Rich Guest

    Why not get a MTB with 2 sets of wheels-Knobby for the trails and flat tread for the road?
     
  3. If you plan on doing any off road at all, then by all means get a mountain bike. A hybrid will be
    most unhappy off pavement and will express this opinion through your wallet.

    For not too much money, you can get a spare set of tires (tyres) that
    can be fitted for road needs. Thouygh it seems appealing to get a spare
    set of wheels, this can get expensive as you need not only the wheels,
    but the rear cassette. Plus you would need to use the exact same rim, or
    risk messing about with your brake adjustemnt everytime you swap them.
    Better to just swap the tires and get that flat changing practice in.

    A
     
  4. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "macca" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > hi all...

    > looking back at my riding habits, I see that I spend most of my time - 90% -on the road (tarmac or
    > asphalt to you Americans ;)
    >
    > it occurs to me that th big chunky tires of a MTB are not the best if this forms the bulk of
    > my riding.

    It's true: Big low-pressure knobby tires don't roll as fast as high-pressure slicks.

    > therefore I'm starting to think a hyrbid bike might be best (those with the skinnier tyres with a
    > bit of tread).. but am worried it wont be up to the job should I want to take it onto somethign a
    > bit rougher and more off road. Is it possible to stick grippier tyres on these things when needed?

    You're right: Hybrids really aren't a good choice for offroad; but it's not just because of the
    tires. I've tried quite a few hybrids over the years, and have owned a couple of them. They feel
    clumsy to me. They aren't fast. Most of them are quite heavy. I don't like the short top tubes. On
    many hybrid frames, there is "toe overlap" - the front wheel hits your foot when turning. That's
    very poor design. I would not feel comfortable riding a hybrid on any offroad trails beyond the
    simplest, easiest trails that can be found. I've heard of people riding moderately difficult
    singletrack on hybrids - I just can't believe it.

    On the other hand, mountain bikes feel agile - like they were made for excellent balance and control
    off road. Turns out, that is exactly the case. Frame geometry can make a huge difference in bike
    handling. (geometry
    = shape of the frame, angles of various frame tubes, height of cranks,
    length/trail of fork, etc) Mountain bikes are purpose-built for offroad riding, and it shows. But
    that doesn't mean they can't go fast on the road, too. They can, with the right tires (and wheels
    - read on).

    > alternatively is it possible for example tobuy a standard MTB, and swap the wheels for a set with
    > thinner tyres as and when I need them?

    Yes, this is what many people do. Mount 26 x 2.0 "city" tires (high pressure - 85psi or higher) on
    the "road" wheels, and knobbies on the other set. I recommend using the same rims for both sets of
    wheels so you won't have to adjust your V-brakes when you swap wheelsets.

    The cheaper option, and still a good one, is to get a plain mountain bike (with V-brakes instead of
    disc brakes) and buy some high-pressure 26 x 2.0 slicks. Almost every tire manufacturer makes an 85
    psi "city tire" nowadays: IRC Metro, Continental Toun & Country, etc. Buy a set of tire levers and
    learn how to swap tires. It takes about 10 minutes or so. That way, when you're ready for that
    weekend offroad adventure, your knobbies are only a tire swap away. It's by far the cheapest option,
    and makes a lot of sense.

    There is an even cooler option, although it's pretty expensive. It turns out that 700c wheels (used
    on most hybrids and virtually all racing and touring bikes) will work perfectly on mountain bikes
    that use disc brakes. The overall diameter of skinny 700c slicks and fat 26" knobbies is almost
    identical. There are bikes on the market (Merlin Newsboy, for instance) that come with a set of 26"
    (559mm rim diameter) mountain bike wheels with fat knobbies for off-road use, *and* a set of 700c
    (622mm rim diameter) road wheels with skinny tires for fast road riding. This is a great setup, with
    maximum versatility. I'm actually in the process of building up just such a bike. It's not easy to
    find 700c disc wheels - you'll probably need to have them built for you - but disc hubs aren't
    expensive (~$50/set for Shimano Deore). Any 700c road rims will work, and you can often find them on
    sale for $15-20 a rim. Figure $150 for the road wheels, and maybe $50 for the disc rotors, another
    $50 for tires and tubes. You can see that this isn't a cheap option; but it would give you an
    extremely versatile bike. One minor issue: Disc brakes, aside from being expensive and heavy, also
    block the rear fender and cargo rack eyelets on frames that come equipped with them, so that will
    limit usefulness somewhat.

    More information than you bargained for? I hope it's at least helpful. Let us know if you have any
    more questions, or email me privately if you like.

    Cheers,

    Barry Sanders
     
  5. Cinder Girl

    Cinder Girl Guest

    "macca" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > hi all...
    >
    > wondering if you can help. Am in the market for a new bike after some kind person stole the
    > last one!
    >
    > not to worry as my last bike was a real cheapy mountain bike!
    >
    > looking back at my riding habits, I see that I spend most of my time - 90% -on the road (tarmac or
    > asphalt to you Americans ;)
    >
    > it occurs to me that th big chunky tires of a MTB are not the best if this forms the bulk of
    > my riding.
    >
    > therefore I'm starting to think a hyrbid bike might be best (those with the skinnier tyres with a
    > bit of tread).. but am worried it wont be up to the job should I want to take it onto somethign a
    > bit rougher and more off road. Is it possible to stick grippier tyres on these things when needed?
    >
    > alternatively is it possible for example tobuy a standard MTB, and swap the wheels for a set with
    > thinner tyres as and when I need them?
    >
    > Just wondering if one option is much better than the other...
    >
    > help! (yes.. am a bit of a newbie looking for guidance :)

    I love my Trek hybrid for around town! City streets are none too smooth around here. I've even done
    some longer road rides with it. But I would never dream of taking it offroad. Follow the advice of
    the other posters and get a mountain bike with two sets of tires.

    ~CG
     
  6. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Fri, 16 May 2003 10:46:32 -0500, Anthony Sloan wrote:

    > For not too much money, you can get a spare set of tires (tyres) that can be fitted for
    > road needs.

    I've been using Michelin Wildgripper Rock tires for several years now, and I've noticed quite a few
    similar tires have come out lately - they have tread but not knobs, making them reasonably effective
    on dry fireroads & easier trails. They also work fantastic on the road, and I don't notice much
    difference between them and the slick tires - most importantly, it doesn't tend to wash out on 30+
    MPH pavement like knobbies will. The only condition they don't work well in is anything that
    requires some real off-road gripping - like steep climbs.

    Here's the Rock: http://cycleus.webmichelin.com/tires/rock.htm

    I have a mountain bike that is set up for exactly the type of riding the OP described - mostly road,
    but if I come upon a trail or fireroad I can ride it as well. I tried this once on slicks, with
    disasterous results (the brakes work, but the tires don't grip with the ground - its like having no
    brakes at all).

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  7. M&M

    M&M Guest

    [email protected] (macca) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > hi all...
    >
    > wondering if you can help. Am in the market for a new bike after some kind person stole the
    > last one!
    >
    > not to worry as my last bike was a real cheapy mountain bike!
    >
    > looking back at my riding habits, I see that I spend most of my time - 90% -on the road (tarmac or
    > asphalt to you Americans ;)
    >
    > it occurs to me that th big chunky tires of a MTB are not the best if this forms the bulk of
    > my riding.
    >
    > therefore I'm starting to think a hyrbid bike might be best (those with the skinnier tyres with a
    > bit of tread).. but am worried it wont be up to the job should I want to take it onto somethign a
    > bit rougher and more off road. Is it possible to stick grippier tyres on these things when needed?
    >
    > alternatively is it possible for example tobuy a standard MTB, and swap the wheels for a set with
    > thinner tyres as and when I need them?
    >
    > Just wondering if one option is much better than the other...
    >
    > help! (yes.. am a bit of a newbie looking for guidance :)

    There are street tires specifically made for Mountain Bikes . If you want to go through the added
    expence , you may also purchase another set of wheels so all you have to do is change out the wheels
    , if you're feeling a bit slothful.

    M&M
     
  8. Jd

    Jd Guest

    [email protected] (macca) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > hi all...
    >
    > wondering if you can help. Am in the market for a new bike after some kind person stole the
    > last one!
    >
    > not to worry as my last bike was a real cheapy mountain bike!
    >
    > looking back at my riding habits, I see that I spend most of my time - 90% -on the road (tarmac or
    > asphalt to you Americans ;)
    >
    > it occurs to me that th big chunky tires of a MTB are not the best if this forms the bulk of
    > my riding.
    >
    > therefore I'm starting to think a hyrbid bike might be best (those with the skinnier tyres with a
    > bit of tread).. but am worried it wont be up to the job should I want to take it onto somethign a
    > bit rougher and more off road. Is it possible to stick grippier tyres on these things when needed?
    >
    > alternatively is it possible for example tobuy a standard MTB, and swap the wheels for a set with
    > thinner tyres as and when I need them?
    >
    > Just wondering if one option is much better than the other...
    >
    > help! (yes.. am a bit of a newbie looking for guidance :)

    Get a multispeed cruiser and do it with style.

    JD
     
  9. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I tried this once on slicks, with disasterous results (the brakes work, but the tires don't grip
    >with the ground - its like having no brakes at all).

    I'm sort of torn between mounting slicks (a good 20% easier to pedal) for road rides and sticking
    with knobbies.

    Problem I have with the slicks is CRS-related. Every so often I forget there aren't any knobs on the
    edges and get luched by a gulley or some other off-camber surface.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  10. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > RE/
    > >I tried this once on slicks, with disasterous results (the brakes work, but the tires don't grip
    > >with the ground - its like having no brakes at all).
    >
    > I'm sort of torn between mounting slicks (a good 20% easier to pedal) for road rides and sticking
    > with knobbies.
    >
    > Problem I have with the slicks is CRS-related. Every so often I forget there aren't any knobs on
    > the edges and get luched by a gulley or some other off-camber surface.
    > -----------------------
    > PeteCresswell

    Have you looked at Maxxis Hookworms?
    --
    Slacker
     
  11. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Fri, 16 May 2003 23:07:13 GMT, (Pete Cresswell) wrote:

    > I'm sort of torn between mounting slicks (a good 20% easier to pedal) for road rides and sticking
    > with knobbies.
    >
    > Problem I have with the slicks is CRS-related. Every so often I forget there aren't any knobs on
    > the edges and get luched by a gulley or some other off-camber surface.

    That's the beauty of the new raised-tread non-knobby designs - they sort of work like a knobby, but
    without all the rolling resistance.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  12. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Have you looked at Maxxis Hookworms?

    65# in a 26x2.5...wow!....

    For that size tire, I'm riding WTB Mutano Raptors - which I like a *lot*. Maybe I'll try the
    Hookworms when the current set of WTB's finally gives up.

    When I said "slicks" I meant 1.25" 90 psi...
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...