Hyde and seek

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Just zis Guy, you know?, Jun 24, 2005.

  1. Yesterday I went to St Mary Axe. Since HM the Queer was changing her
    guard or some such the tube was (a) packed and (b) suffocating, so I
    was glad I had the option of open air transport with a 15mph full-body
    fan :)

    I went via Hyde Park, the Embankment and, I think, Exeter. It
    certainly felt as if I'd ridden many times the actual distance door to
    door.

    How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    in the smoke.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
     
    Tags:


  2. Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    > HM the Queer


    ToBAGO?

    > How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    > navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    > in the smoke.


    Cheer up, little loonie lad. The first twenty years are the worst...

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    Although the hippopotamus hath no sting in its tail, the wise man would
    rather be seated upon the back of a bee.
     
  3. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 12:56:35 +0100 someone who may be "Just zis Guy,
    you know?" <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    >navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    >in the smoke.


    Do you not have satellite navigation on your Brompton?


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me by using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  4. daren

    daren Guest

    7 years as a student help :) I used to drive the college soup run
    around London. There are only a few places worthy of crossing the river
    (if that helps).

    Now that you have a Brompton, I suggest heading into London for a
    pleasant Sunday morning cycle. The roads are deserted and you can find
    your way around the key routes without too much hassle.

    I normally ride the major roads rather than back streets, although a
    pigeon-sense of direction helps.

    Paddington to Hyde Park, out at Hyde Park Corner, through Victoria,
    along the Embankment, along to the city past St Pauls, up towards
    Livepool St, back towards Euston Road, Marylebone and back into
    Paddington. Try a pop-up London Map.

    Coffee and buns all round, take the new tandem

    regards,
    daren
    --
    remove outer garment for reply
     
  5. Mark McNeill

    Mark McNeill Guest

    Response to Just zis Guy, you know?:
    > I went via Hyde Park, the Embankment and, I think, Exeter. It
    > certainly felt as if I'd ridden many times the actual distance door to
    > door.
    >
    > How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    > navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    > in the smoke.


    <g> - In phrenology terms, I have not so much a bump of direction, rather
    a slight dent; I've got lost in London (even the central, recognisable
    bits) more often than I can remember.

    I've even got myself totally disorientated in central Manhattan, which -
    considering it's laid out on a grid with [mostly] rationally numbered
    streets - is pretty good going. (Wasn't cycling in Manhattan, though,
    which is probably just as well.)

    --
    Mark, UK

    "What arouses the indignation of the honest satirist is not, unless the
    man is a prig, the fact that people in positions of power or influence
    behave idiotically, or even that they behave wickedly. It is that they
    conspire successfully to impose upon the public a picture of themselves
    as so very sagacious, honest and well-intentioned."
     
  6. Bryan

    Bryan New Member

    Joined:
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    How can you not find St Mary Axe, there's a bloody gert gherkin in it! :)

    Bryan
     
  7. On 24 Jun 2005 05:30:00 -0700, "daren"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Now that you have a Brompton, I suggest heading into London for a
    >pleasant Sunday morning cycle. The roads are deserted and you can find
    >your way around the key routes without too much hassle.


    Good plan. Maybe next time there's a family concert at the Festival
    Hall.

    >Paddington to Hyde Park, out at Hyde Park Corner, through Victoria,
    >along the Embankment, along to the city past St Pauls, up towards
    >Livepool St, back towards Euston Road, Marylebone and back into
    >Paddington.


    That was what I was trying to do :)

    >Try a pop-up London Map.


    ? I got a TfL map, but it didn't help a lot.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
     
  8. Nick Kew

    Nick Kew Guest

    Bryan wrote:

    > How can you not find St Mary Axe, there's a bloody gert gherkin in it!


    It's a move that requires Humph's second oblique approach rule.
    But that's always been disallowed in months beginning with a J.

    --
    Not me guv
     
  9. "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]>typed


    > >Try a pop-up London Map.


    > ?


    Cunningly folded maps, about the size of a credit crad (when folded) you
    can buy from some vending machines. Contain a surprising amount of
    detail.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  10. On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 22:39:11 +1000, Bryan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How can you not find St Mary Axe, there's a bloody gert gherkin in it!


    Well, yes, and the office is right opposite said excrescence, but it's
    not actually that easy to see from the streets round about. The old
    NatWest tower is easier to spot. And then you have all the poxy
    one-way streets to contend with...

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
     
  11. On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 15:51:55 +0100, Just zis Guy, you know?
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Well, yes, and the office is right opposite said excrescence, but it's
    > not actually that easy to see from the streets round about. The old
    > NatWest tower is easier to spot. And then you have all the poxy
    > one-way streets to contend with...


    Shirley if you're cycling in London you're *required* to
    cycle the wrong way up one-way streets... <g, d, r>

    Crossposted to uk.rec.driving for extra Friday fun. [1]

    [1] Not really. I'll get me coat.

    --
    jc
     
  12. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > Yesterday I went to St Mary Axe. Since HM the Queer was changing her
    > guard or some such the tube was (a) packed and (b) suffocating, so I
    > was glad I had the option of open air transport with a 15mph full-body
    > fan :)
    >
    > I went via Hyde Park, the Embankment and, I think, Exeter. It
    > certainly felt as if I'd ridden many times the actual distance door to
    > door.
    >
    > How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    > navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    > in the smoke.


    http://www.cyclemaps.com Choice of quieter or direct routes. Use it
    all the time and owner is very appreciative and responsive if you find
    any errors.

    --
    Tony

    "I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
    Anon
     
  13. Naqerj

    Naqerj Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    > How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    > navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    > in the smoke.
    >


    I very, very rarely cycle or drive in London, but when I have (and also
    whenever I've been walking) I adopt the plan of just heading in what
    seems to be the general direction of my destination. So far, it's
    always worked and I ended up where I wanted to be. How it works, I
    don't know and it's probably best not to probe too deeply - that might
    stop it working.

    --
    Andrew
     
  14. Naqerj wrote:
    > Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    >> How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    >> navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    >> in the smoke.

    >
    > I very, very rarely cycle or drive in London, but when I have (and also
    > whenever I've been walking) I adopt the plan of just heading in what
    > seems to be the general direction of my destination. So far, it's
    > always worked and I ended up where I wanted to be.


    Lucky you. I've lived here for 8 years, cycling everywhere, and rode
    around a lot in buses before that, and I still find it hard to follow
    a straightish line unless I'm on a main road. One-ways are the biggest
    bugbear.

    But it does get better with practice, especially if you can identify
    the main roads when you hit them AND know which way round they are.

    Colin McKenzie
     
  15. congokid

    congokid Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, "Just zis Guy,
    you know?" <[email protected]> writes

    >How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    >navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    >in the smoke.


    My first London commute was from Maida Vale to Cleveland Street, next
    door to Telecom Tower. At first I followed Edgware Road to Marble Arch,
    but later I'm sure I used to detour through Regent's Park. Until I
    realised the park police didn't take kindly to that.

    By that stage I'd already lived in London for about nine months, with a
    couple of summer holidays before that, so I had a rough idea of where
    places were, at least in the centre.

    Later when I lived in Marylebone and worked in Soho, it didn't seem
    worth getting the bike out - it hadn't been used for almost two years
    and lived in a cupboard. Anyway, by then I'd learned to drive, got a
    licence and a car in quick succession, and half my job was in Greenford
    or Stockley Park - both easier to drive to than cycle.

    Then I moved to Fulham. The bike was overhauled for renewed service. My
    commute was up the King's Road to Soho - nice route that avoids Hyde
    Park Corner but includes Buck House, Mall, Pall Mall, Piccadilly Circus.

    These days I go a bit further to Chancery Lane.

    The secret is to have lots of local knowledge and check the A-Z well in
    advance for the best route, avoiding areas you'd prefer not to drive
    round (assuming you've been there and driven round them).

    --
    congokid
    Good restaurants in London? Number one on Google
    http://congokid.com
     
  16. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    >
    >> HM the Queer

    >
    > ToBAGO?
    >
    >> How the hell do you do it? My dad can navigate in London, and I can
    >> navigate everywhere else, but I simply cannot get the hang of cycling
    >> in the smoke.

    >
    > Cheer up, little loonie lad. The first twenty years are the worst...


    Thanks for your Ortlieb document holder recommendation Dave. Came in useful
    on Tuesday when I cycled 30km, roughly from the south of the south circular
    across Tower Bridge and to the North Circular, I took autoroute directions
    since I didn't know the way too well. Total cycle 1 hour 15 minutes. My
    friend drove almost exactly the same distance in 2 hours 30 minutes.
    Hehehehehehe!
     
  17. audrey

    audrey Guest

    On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 14:48:09 +0100, Helen Deborah Vecht
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]>typed
    >
    >
    >> >Try a pop-up London Map.


    >
    >Cunningly folded maps, about the size of a credit crad (when folded) you
    >can buy from some vending machines. Contain a surprising amount of
    >detail.


    and are marvellous for giving one a sense of the over-ground jograffy
    of central London. I use a combination of pop-up [1] map, TfL cycle
    map and asking passersby to get me around London and usually manage to
    only cycle twice as far as necessary.


    [1] actually called pop-out maps (tm) and available from all good
    booksellers
    http://www.mapgroup.net/Popout/
     
  18. [snip]
    >
    > and are marvellous for giving one a sense of the over-ground

    jograffy
    > of central London. I use a combination of pop-up [1] map, TfL

    cycle
    > map and asking passersby to get me around London and usually manage

    to
    > only cycle twice as far as necessary.


    [snip]

    For central London the TfL cycle maps do show one way streets, on the
    enlarged panel on the back. For the rest of London the map only
    shows one way streets for roads "recommended"on the map

    Jeremy Parker
     
  19. [snip]

    >
    > I've even got myself totally disorientated in central Manhattan,

    which -
    > considering it's laid out on a grid with [mostly] rationally

    numbered
    > streets - is pretty good going. (Wasn't cycling in Manhattan,

    though,
    > which is probably just as well.)
    >
    > --
    > Mark, UK


    You should try Boston, Mass., built round Boston Common, which has
    five right angled corners. I think there's some kind of heavy
    equipment at MIT, which distorts the space-time continuum, or
    something.

    They also have a book "The Boston Drivers' Handbook", a humorous (I
    hope) guide to newcomers on how to drive as badly as locals. The
    section on dealing with cyclists is interesting.

    Jeremy Parker
     
  20. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Jeremy Parker wrote:
    >
    >
    > You should try Boston, Mass., built round Boston Common, which has
    > five right angled corners. I think there's some kind of heavy
    > equipment at MIT, which distorts the space-time continuum, or
    > something.
    >


    We have our own space-time discontinuity in Bristol. Going to the
    University, at the top of Park Street you can either turn right past
    Browns and do the steep climb up University Road to the University or
    you can carry on on the flat all the way round Whiteladies Road,
    Tyndall's Park Road and Woodland Road to get to the same end point


    --
    Tony

    "I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
    Anon
     
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