Hydration and Camelbak

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Whinds, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. Whinds

    Whinds Guest

    I'm seeing more and more Camelbaks on the trails and am
    wondering what the consensus is here.

    My training trail has a lot of water stops available so it
    is not a major problem. I usually ride 80 miles daily with a
    century + on the weekend. I use two water cages and a fanny
    pack that has dual bottle carriers. I start the day with
    water in the cages and a 20oz bottle of diet Mountain Dew in
    the fanny pack. The MD is for the caffiine, I don't drank
    coffee. The remaining bottle carrier is for a bananna and
    heavy duty surgical gloves for roadside repairs. The fanny
    pack itself holds protein bars, clear glasses, serving size
    powdered Gatorade in baggies and a well stocked first aid
    kit. (I'm prone to road rash) My rain jacket rides under my
    seat with spare tubes and my tool kit. I've sorta become
    accustomed to this setup but am thinking maybe someone in
    the NG has a better idea.

    I'm thinking of moving into double centuries this year and
    am wondering if a Camelbak would improve my ride. I've
    looked at 3 versions. The Rocket looks sleek and has
    improved air flow but holds the least amount of liquid. The
    Lobo is quite nice, slim, more water capacity, but lite on
    serious storage. The Mule holds 100oz and appears to be the
    logical choice with a net to hold leg warmers and a long
    sleeve shirt but is it too big and bulky? I don't know if I
    want something this large hanging on my shoulders for a
    long ride.
     
    Tags:


  2. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    While I can't say I ride anywhere near a double century,
    I do use a Rocket on a regular basis. I live in Florida
    and two large bottles just don't cut it in our tropical
    humidity. I keep my minitool, keys, spare tube, gloves,
    wallet, and other assorted stuff in it and it's quite
    bearable. It's not very heavy, and the Coolmax back
    keeps cool. It's kinda Fredly to wear one on the road,
    but I like it.
     
  3. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On 10 Mar 2004 01:39:50 GMT, [email protected] (whinds) from AOL
    http://www.aol.com wrote:

    >I'm thinking of moving into double centuries this year and
    >am wondering if a Camelbak would improve my ride. I've
    >looked at 3 versions. The Rocket looks sleek and has
    >improved air flow but holds the least amount of liquid. The
    >Lobo is quite nice, slim, more water capacity, but lite on
    >serious storage. The Mule holds 100oz and appears to be the
    >logical choice with a net to hold leg warmers and a long
    >sleeve shirt but is it too big and bulky? I don't know if I
    >want something this large hanging on my shoulders for a
    >long ride.

    Trust me, you don't. The weight gets to be a real drag after
    about 80 miles for
    me. I'd hate lugging one for 200. At that distance, I think
    you're better off looking for some sort of on-bike
    storage, like a rack with a trunk.

    --
    [email protected]
    What is the reality of the situation?
    3
     
  4. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 10 Mar 2004 01:39:50 GMT, [email protected] (whinds) wrote:
    >I'm seeing more and more Camelbaks on the trails and am
    >wondering what the consensus is here.

    Why is the word "trail" commonly used to refer to pavement?
    I've always figured it meant dirt, and one would say "route"
    or "path" (depending on context) for pavement.

    Of course, if you're talking about doing double centuries on
    hilly singletrack, well, you can use any word you want to
    describe anything you want; that's quite a feat, deserving
    much respect.

    >My training trail has a lot of water stops available so it
    >is not a major problem. I usually ride 80 miles daily with
    >a century + on the weekend. I use two water cages and a
    >fanny pack that has dual bottle carriers. I start the day
    >with water in the cages and a 20oz bottle of diet Mountain
    >Dew in the fanny pack. The MD is for the caffiine, I don't
    >drank coffee. The remaining bottle

    Caffeine can be had in a more compact, lightweight,
    convenient pill form; you can break the pill into smaller
    servings. It's probably a bit cheaper than 20oz bottled soft
    drinks, too.

    >carrier is for a bananna and heavy duty surgical gloves for
    >roadside repairs. The fanny pack itself holds protein bars,
    >clear glasses, serving size powdered Gatorade in baggies
    >and a well stocked first aid kit. (I'm prone to road rash)
    >My rain jacket rides under my seat with spare tubes and my
    >tool kit. I've sorta become accustomed to this setup but am
    >thinking maybe someone in the NG has a better idea.

    Better than something that you're so satisfied with?

    It ain't broke. Don't fix it.

    >I'm thinking of moving into double centuries this year and
    >am wondering if a Camelbak would improve my ride. I've
    >looked at 3 versions. The Rocket looks sleek and has
    >improved air flow but holds the least amount of liquid. The
    >Lobo is quite nice, slim, more water capacity, but lite on
    >serious storage. The Mule holds 100oz and appears to be the
    >logical choice with a net to hold leg warmers and a long
    >sleeve shirt but is it too big and bulky? I don't know if I
    >want something this large hanging on my shoulders for a
    >long ride.

    I ride with backpacks like these. I have a small,
    streamlined one that I don't bother with anymore. I have a
    Camelbak Mule, equipped for mountain biking. I have an
    "Ultimate XSpurt", with nearly or the same cargo capacity as
    the Mule, equipped for road riding.

    Of course, the reservoirs are interchangeable.

    The air flow things on the back of my Mule are ineffective,
    but may work better if I didn't have it so stuffed. The
    flat, soft back on the road pack is fine.

    My back gets rather hot and sweaty. Carrying all the crap on
    my back ends up putting more weight on my arms and hands.
    For road riding, I've been trying to offload some of the
    stuff to the bike, but am hampered by having one set of
    equipment for riding many different bikes.

    I'd say that if you're happy with what you've got,
    don't mess with
    it. If you want to carry additional liquid and/or solid
    cargo, and you don't wish to add it to the bike, a
    backpack is a good option, but I wouldn't just pull
    everything off the bike and throw it on my back.

    It's more useful to have on your back when off road, where
    you need the more nimble, lighter bike to more easily throw
    around underneath you...and the pack + stuff works as back
    armor when you biff.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  5. "whinds" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I'm thinking of moving into double centuries this year and
    > am wondering if
    a
    > Camelbak would improve my ride.

    Here's the issues:

    One, is, if you have a camelbak, you're more likely to drink
    more often. So, in that sense, having a camelbak will
    improve your ride, if you don't drink very regularly
    otherwise. Somehow it's easy to take little sips all the
    time with a camelbak, but it's a hassle to reach for your
    water bottle.

    Second, if you're doing a very long ride and it's
    unsupported, you might want a camelbak so you'll have enough
    water between water sources. I remember one long ride I took
    in unfamiliar territory, and I very sharply remember there
    being an espresso stand (yeah, Seattle area) in the middle
    of a small town. The woman at the stand very kindly filled
    my camelbak with ice and then cold water, just out of
    complete human kindness. This really helped me out, as I
    otherwise wouldn't have had easy access to water for the
    next thirty miles. It's situations like these where having a
    large water bladder, and not just a couple of bottles, is
    really helpful.

    Third, if you're in very hot weather, a camelbak is
    indispensable. I did a short but very hot ride in the desert
    outside of Las Vegas one year in July, and my husband and I
    filled out camelbaks three times in three hours -- I have a
    72 oz and he has a 100 oz. That's a lot of water, but each
    time the bladders were completely drained by the time we hit
    a water source again.

    However, a full camelbak is heavy. Because of the weight of
    those things, if you're planning to do these long rides this
    summer, the time to start training with a full camelbak is
    now. Get used to carrying a weight on your shoulders in
    March, and it won't seem so bad in July.

    If you regularly hydrate without the camelbak, if you are
    planning a supported double century, and if you don't
    anticipate the weather being extraordinarily hot, then I
    wouldn't bother with the camelbak. That's too much weight to
    carry on your back for 200 miles.

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato
    and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm Email me
    re: the new Tiferet CD (http://www.tiferet.net) See the
    books I've set free at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  6. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "whinds" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > I'm thinking of moving into double centuries this year and
    > am wondering if a Camelbak would improve my ride.

    I stopped using a Camelbak for all road rides after using
    one out of habit for years. For long road rides, they're
    just too uncomfortable. I use insulated water bottles
    (Polar, 24 oz.). I have 3 holders on my distance bike, and
    often use a rear rack to carry extra gear and bottles if the
    weather is very hot and/or the distances between water stops
    is large. Getting all that weight off your back makes a big
    difference, especially for doubles & beyond. I'll often get
    a big bottle of OJ or similar at stops, drink some, then
    pour the rest into an empty bottle to drink over the next
    hour or so.
     
  7. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 10 Mar 2004 01:39:50 GMT, [email protected] (whinds) wrote:

    >I'm thinking of moving into double centuries this year and
    >am wondering if a Camelbak would improve my ride. I've
    >looked at 3 versions. The Rocket looks sleek and has
    >improved air flow but holds the least amount of liquid. The
    >Lobo is quite nice, slim, more water capacity, but lite on
    >serious storage. The Mule holds 100oz and appears to be the
    >logical choice with a net to hold leg warmers and a long
    >sleeve shirt but is it too big and bulky? I don't know if I
    >want something this large hanging on my shoulders for a
    >long ride.

    I rode with water bottles for years and years until I got a
    Mule a year and a half ago. What really surprised me was how
    quickly I got used to wearing it. If you try a Camelbak
    you'll probably find you soon don't even notice you're
    wearing it.

    I still ride primarily with water bottles but find the
    Camelbak particularly useful for riding in the Rockies,
    where I want supplemental clothing readily available. The
    mule is also handy for day-hikes.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net
    http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  8. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    whinds wrote:

    > I'm seeing more and more Camelbaks on the trails and am
    > wondering what the consensus is here.
    >
    > My training trail has a lot of water stops available so it
    > is not a major problem. I usually ride 80 miles daily with
    > a century + on the weekend. I use two water cages and a
    > fanny pack that has dual bottle carriers. I start the day
    > with water in the cages and a 20oz bottle of diet Mountain
    > Dew in the fanny pack. The MD is for the caffiine, I don't
    > drank coffee. The remaining bottle carrier is for a
    > bananna and heavy duty surgical gloves for roadside
    > repairs. The fanny pack itself holds protein bars, clear
    > glasses, serving size powdered Gatorade in baggies and a
    > well stocked first aid kit. (I'm prone to road rash) My
    > rain jacket rides under my seat with spare tubes and my
    > tool kit. I've sorta become accustomed to this setup but
    > am thinking maybe someone in the NG has a better idea.

    You ought to be able to fit all this stuff in a medium sized
    saddlebag plus jersey pockets. That's what I do, for about
    the same amount of stuff. Why the fanny pack?

    > I'm thinking of moving into double centuries this year and
    > am wondering if a Camelbak would improve my ride. I've
    > looked at 3 versions. The Rocket looks sleek and has
    > improved air flow but holds the least amount of liquid.
    > The Lobo is quite nice, slim, more water capacity, but
    > lite on serious storage. The Mule holds 100oz and appears
    > to be the logical choice with a net to hold leg warmers
    > and a long sleeve shirt but is it too big and bulky? I
    > don't know if I want something this large hanging on my
    > shoulders for a long ride.

    You probably don't.

    Camelbacks are great for off road riding, where they
    get the weight off the bike for better handling on
    technical terrain. They also make it easier to drink.
    But for road riding, it's definately more comfortable
    to carry stuff on the bike. If you really need more
    water capacity, try to find a place on your bike for an
    extra water bottle. However, there are usually enough
    places to fill up when riding on the road, especially
    on an organized/supported ride.

    In my experience, it's not the weight that matters so much
    with the Camelback, but the sweat and heat on your back. It
    affects how your body radiates heat and stays cool. If
    you're riding in an arid climate out west it doesn't matter
    as much, but it could really affect you in hot, humid
    weather with big climbs.

    Matt O.
     
  9. Nicholas

    Nicholas Guest

    Hey, Folks:

    Do you intend to use the word "CamelBak" as a brand name, or
    merely as a generic reference to a backpack water carrier?

    LONE PEAK PACKS makes many different packs for the bicycle
    and rider, including hydration backpacks.

    http://www.lonepeakpacks.com/h2o.html

    Regards, Nicholas Grieco
     
  10. Whinds

    Whinds Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Nicholas) writes:

    >
    >Do you intend to use the word "CamelBak" as a brand
    >name, or merely as a generic reference to a backpack
    >water carrier?
    >
    I meant the brand CamelBak. I get turned off by the cross
    naming methods such as used on eBay. I have yet to see any
    hydration pack as good as CamelBak's. CamelBaks are more
    expensive than the others I've seen but I think their
    bladders are the best. I bought a Platypus a couple of years
    ago and used the bladder once.

    >LONE PEAK PACKS makes many different packs for the bicycle
    >and rider, including hydration backpacks.
    >
    >http://www.lonepeakpacks.com/h2o.html
    >
    Thanks for the link Nicholas, they have a lot of nice
    looking packs. Have you used any of them? What does the
    bladder look like? Do they have screw on fill caps?
     
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