Hydrogen Peroxide & Alkaline water, is this a super antioxidant?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Ricky Spartacus, Oct 30, 2003.

  1. I`ve used water ionizers for two years now. Health practioners
    mentioned not to mix hydrogen peroxide with ionized water. I have fed
    H2O2 into water ionizers and found lots of air bubbles formed.
    Drinking it gives lots of energy.

    Question:
    I am told that Active oxygen (free radicals - negatively charged) is
    similar to H2O2. Scientifically, do running H2O2 and water thru water
    ionizers create more positively charged oxygen?

    Active oxygen, see below:
    http://www.heartspring.net/health_products.html

    How IONIZERS works below:
    http://www.water4u.net/tech/tech.html
     
    Tags:


  2. Wdyorchid

    Wdyorchid Guest

    >I am told that Active oxygen (free radicals - negatively charged)

    Basically both acids and free radicals are ions with positive electrical
    charges, ie. atoms missing electrons.

    >I have fed H2O2 into water ionizers and found lots of air
    >bubbles formed. Drinking it gives lots of energy.


    You should be drinking the alkaline port, which produces negatively charged
    water.

    >Scientifically, do running H2O2 and water thru water
    >ionizers create more positively charged oxygen?


    If your water ionizer has an acidic port, it will produce positively charged
    water. For drinking purposes, I think you mean negatively charge oxygen. I
    don't know the answer.
    Wd
     
  3. In <[email protected]>, Ricky Spartacus wrote:

    > I`ve used water ionizers for two years now. Health practioners
    > mentioned not to mix hydrogen peroxide with ionized water. I have fed
    > H2O2 into water ionizers and found lots of air bubbles formed.
    > Drinking it gives lots of energy.


    Hydrogen peroxide is rocket fuel; disturb it and it breaks
    down to water and oxygen gas. Almost anything will do the
    trick.

    > Question:
    > I am told that Active oxygen (free radicals - negatively charged) is
    > similar to H2O2. Scientifically, do running H2O2 and water thru water
    > ionizers create more positively charged oxygen?


    It creates oxygen gas, the same as in air.

    > Active oxygen, see below:
    > http://www.heartspring.net/health_products.html
    >
    > How IONIZERS works below:
    > http://www.water4u.net/tech/tech.html


    --
    | "Really, I'm not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a |
    | completely unintentional side effect. " -- Linus Torvalds |
    +--------------- D. C. Sessions <[email protected]> ----------+
     
  4. Bronsing

    Bronsing Guest

    Ricky Spartacus <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > I`ve used water ionizers for two years now. Health practioners
    > mentioned not to mix hydrogen peroxide with ionized water. I have fed
    > H2O2 into water ionizers and found lots of air bubbles formed.
    > Drinking it gives lots of energy.


    The bubbles are the result of H2O2 breaking down in oxygen and water,
    probably due to the electrodes in the "water ionizer". Drinking it is simply
    drinking water, and be thankful that it is just that: water. Don't attempt
    to drink H2O2 in any significant concentration, since it is a very potent
    oxydizer and that's not good for your health.


    >
    > Question:
    > I am told that Active oxygen (free radicals - negatively charged) is
    > similar to H2O2. Scientifically, do running H2O2 and water thru water
    > ionizers create more positively charged oxygen?


    BULLSHIT. Positively charged oxygen is a fable, it doesn't exist under
    normal conditions. Yes, the most common oxygen radical is superoxide and
    that's negatively charged. Luckily, one of the most effective enzymes in
    your body is superoxidedismutase and that will convert the superoxide into
    H2O2, which is then converted into H2O and O2 (normal oxygen) by means of
    the enzyme catalase. By the way, negatively charged doesn't mean radical and
    radical also doesn't mean negatively charged. The charge of a radical is
    dependent on the electronic wavefunction before the radical is formed. For
    example, hydroxyl radical is electrically neutral but is a very agressive
    radical while chloride ion is negatively charged but not a radical.


    >
    > Active oxygen, see below:
    > xxx-xxxx-xxxx>
    > How IONIZERS works below:
    > xxx-xxxx-xxxx


    Hmmmm, the ionizer electrolyzes tap water?!?!?! HAHAHA! Don't waste you
    money on this, it doesn't work. It's pseudoscience.

    --

    Robert Bronsing

    Can't you see?
    It all makes perfect sense,
    expressed in dollars and cents, pounds, shillings and pence

    (R. Waters)
     
  5. Bronsing

    Bronsing Guest

    Wdyorchid <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >I am told that Active oxygen (free radicals - negatively charged)

    >
    > Basically both acids and free radicals are ions with positive electrical
    > charges, ie. atoms missing electrons.


    Radicals are NOT nessecarily positively charged, some are neutral, some are
    negatively charged. Using the Lewis definition of acids shows also that
    acids are not nessecarily positively charged; they just need to be able to
    accept electrones.

    >
    > >I have fed H2O2 into water ionizers and found lots of air
    > >bubbles formed. Drinking it gives lots of energy.

    >
    > You should be drinking the alkaline port, which produces negatively

    charged
    > water.


    No, it doesn't.



    --

    Robert Bronsing

    Can't you see?
    It all makes perfect sense,
    expressed in dollars and cents, pounds, shillings and pence

    (R. Waters)
     
  6. > > I`ve used water ionizers for two years now. Health practioners
    > > mentioned not to mix hydrogen peroxide with ionized water. I have fed
    > > H2O2 into water ionizers and found lots of air bubbles formed.
    > > Drinking it gives lots of energy.

    >
    > The bubbles are the result of H2O2 breaking down in oxygen and water,
    > probably due to the electrodes in the "water ionizer". Drinking it is simply
    > drinking water, and be thankful that it is just that: water. Don't attempt
    > to drink H2O2 in any significant concentration, since it is a very potent
    > oxydizer and that's not good for your health.



    Ok, if there`s no such things as positively charged oxygen, then what
    about negatively charged water molecues. Here is the main question:
    Did H2O2 still retain it`s H2O2 structure or did it just turned into
    water when producing to a ph of 9? Since H2O2 in any significant
    concentration, is a very potent Oxydizer, will running it thru the
    machine destroys it oxidizing abilities?
    R

    > > Question:
    > > I am told that Active oxygen (free radicals - negatively charged) is
    > > similar to H2O2. Scientifically, do running H2O2 and water thru water
    > > ionizers create more positively charged oxygen?

    >
    > BULLSHIT. Positively charged oxygen is a fable, it doesn't exist under
    > normal conditions. Yes, the most common oxygen radical is superoxide and
    > that's negatively charged. Luckily, one of the most effective enzymes in
    > your body is superoxidedismutase and that will convert the superoxide into
    > H2O2, which is then converted into H2O and O2 (normal oxygen) by means of
    > the enzyme catalase. By the way, negatively charged doesn't mean radical and
    > radical also doesn't mean negatively charged. The charge of a radical is
    > dependent on the electronic wavefunction before the radical is formed. For
    > example, hydroxyl radical is electrically neutral but is a very agressive
    > radical while chloride ion is negatively charged but not a radical.
    > Hmmmm, the ionizer electrolyzes tap water?!?!?! HAHAHA! Don't waste you
    > money on this, it doesn't work. It's pseudoscience.
    > Robert Bronsing
     
  7. In <[email protected]>, Ricky Spartacus wrote:

    > Ok, if there`s no such things as positively charged oxygen, then what
    > about negatively charged water molecues. Here is the main question:
    > Did H2O2 still retain it`s H2O2 structure or did it just turned into
    > water when producing to a ph of 9? Since H2O2 in any significant
    > concentration, is a very potent Oxydizer, will running it thru the
    > machine destroys it oxidizing abilities?


    For all practical purposes, you can't have positively charged
    water molecules. Take an electron away from a water molecule
    and it tends to dissociate into H+ and OH. Since water is
    always partially dissociated (the product of the H+ and OH-
    concentrations is 1E-14) any electrons are effectively stripped
    from one of them.

    As for pH of 9, that just means that something has been added
    which tips the balance of H+ and OH- -- an example being
    CaCO3 (calcium carbonate). In the absense of an alkaline salt
    (NaOH, CaHCO3, etc.) the H and OH both tend to settle down
    neatly to concentrations of 1E-7. Most tap water has a
    fairly high concentration of alkaline salts, though, so a
    high pH is normal for it.

    However, a high pH is not the same as a positive charge.
    pH 9 has lost 99% of its H+ population. It doesn't take
    much in the way of atomic charges to pile up a honking
    potential. The charge on an electron is 1.6E-19 coulombs,
    and there are 6.23E23 water atoms in only 18 grams of
    water. That means about 6.23E16 each of H+ and OH+ per
    18 grams, with a net charge of 6.23E16x1.6E-19 or just
    about 0.01 coulomb. If that doesn't sound like much,
    it's enough to raise a human body to tens of millions
    of volts -- and that's only 18 grams of water.

    I leave it to your imagination what the electrical
    consequences would be of getting pH 9 though bulk
    charge alteration on a wee 250 mL glass of water.

    --
    | "Really, I'm not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a |
    | completely unintentional side effect. " -- Linus Torvalds |
    +--------------- D. C. Sessions <[email protected]> ----------+
     
  8. > > Ok, if there`s no such things as positively charged oxygen, then what
    > > about negatively charged water molecues. Here is the main question:
    > > Did H2O2 still retain it`s H2O2 structure or did it just turned into
    > > water when producing to a ph of 9? Since H2O2 in any significant
    > > concentration, is a very potent Oxydizer, will running it thru the
    > > machine destroys it oxidizing abilities?

    >
    > For all practical purposes, you can't have positively charged
    > water molecules. Take an electron away from a water molecule
    > and it tends to dissociate into H+ and OH. Since water is
    > always partially dissociated (the product of the H+ and OH-
    > concentrations is 1E-14) any electrons are effectively stripped
    > from one of them.
    > As for pH of 9, that just means that something has been added
    > which tips the balance of H+ and OH- -- an example being
    > CaCO3 (calcium carbonate). In the absense of an alkaline salt
    > (NaOH, CaHCO3, etc.) the H and OH both tend to settle down
    > neatly to concentrations of 1E-7. Most tap water has a
    > fairly high concentration of alkaline salts, though, so a
    > high pH is normal for it.
    > However, a high pH is not the same as a positive charge.
    > pH 9 has lost 99% of its H+ population. It doesn't take
    > much in the way of atomic charges to pile up a honking
    > potential. The charge on an electron is 1.6E-19 coulombs,
    > and there are 6.23E23 water atoms in only 18 grams of
    > water. That means about 6.23E16 each of H+ and OH+ per
    > 18 grams, with a net charge of 6.23E16x1.6E-19 or just
    > about 0.01 coulomb. If that doesn't sound like much,
    > it's enough to raise a human body to tens of millions
    > of volts -- and that's only 18 grams of water.
    > I leave it to your imagination what the electrical
    > consequences would be of getting pH 9 though bulk
    > charge alteration on a wee 250 mL glass of water.


    What if I run 1% of H2O2 (other 99% is water) thru a negatively charge
    electrode, the kind of electrode found inside water ionizers, will I
    at least get just a little bit of reduced H2O2 (H2O2 gaining more
    electrons?)
     
  9. no.

    H2O2 is unstable. It decomposes to form oxygen and water easily.

    You toss an extra electron on the molecule, it will decompose.

    j



    Ricky Spartacus wrote:
    >>>Ok, if there`s no such things as positively charged oxygen, then what
    >>>about negatively charged water molecues. Here is the main question:
    >>>Did H2O2 still retain it`s H2O2 structure or did it just turned into
    >>>water when producing to a ph of 9? Since H2O2 in any significant
    >>>concentration, is a very potent Oxydizer, will running it thru the
    >>>machine destroys it oxidizing abilities?

    >>
    >>For all practical purposes, you can't have positively charged
    >>water molecules. Take an electron away from a water molecule
    >>and it tends to dissociate into H+ and OH. Since water is
    >>always partially dissociated (the product of the H+ and OH-
    >>concentrations is 1E-14) any electrons are effectively stripped
    >>from one of them.
    >>As for pH of 9, that just means that something has been added
    >>which tips the balance of H+ and OH- -- an example being
    >>CaCO3 (calcium carbonate). In the absense of an alkaline salt
    >>(NaOH, CaHCO3, etc.) the H and OH both tend to settle down
    >>neatly to concentrations of 1E-7. Most tap water has a
    >>fairly high concentration of alkaline salts, though, so a
    >>high pH is normal for it.
    >>However, a high pH is not the same as a positive charge.
    >>pH 9 has lost 99% of its H+ population. It doesn't take
    >>much in the way of atomic charges to pile up a honking
    >>potential. The charge on an electron is 1.6E-19 coulombs,
    >>and there are 6.23E23 water atoms in only 18 grams of
    >>water. That means about 6.23E16 each of H+ and OH+ per
    >>18 grams, with a net charge of 6.23E16x1.6E-19 or just
    >>about 0.01 coulomb. If that doesn't sound like much,
    >>it's enough to raise a human body to tens of millions
    >>of volts -- and that's only 18 grams of water.
    >>I leave it to your imagination what the electrical
    >>consequences would be of getting pH 9 though bulk
    >>charge alteration on a wee 250 mL glass of water.

    >
    >
    > What if I run 1% of H2O2 (other 99% is water) thru a negatively charge
    > electrode, the kind of electrode found inside water ionizers, will I
    > at least get just a little bit of reduced H2O2 (H2O2 gaining more
    > electrons?)
     
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