hyperthyroidism / rust / oxidative stress

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Mar 20, 2005.

  1. Mediators Inflamm. 2005 Feb;2005(1):57-9. Related Articles, Links


    Levels of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase in subclinical
    hyperthyroidism.

    Cetinkaya A, Kurutas EB, Buyukbese MA, Kantarceken B, Bulbuloglu E.

    We aimed to determine whether patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism
    (SH) are subject to oxidative stress. Twenty-two women and 8 men having
    endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism for a duration of at least 6
    months, and 21 women and 9 men healthy controls were included in this
    study. We measured the level of plasma malondialdehyde, as one of the
    lipid peroxidation markers, and the activity of erythrocyte superoxide
    dismutase, which is an antioxidant enzyme. The activity of erythrocyte
    superoxide dismutase and plasma malondialdehyde levels were found to be
    significantly higher in subjects with subclinical hyperthyroidism than
    the control group ( $P &<.01$ ). The results of this study suggest that
    oxidative stress and antioxidative response could be increased in
    patients having subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    PMID: 15770068 [PubMed - in process]

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Who loves ya.
    Tom

    http://herbivore.7h.com
     
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  2. montygram

    montygram Guest

    Physiologically, it's much more likely the other way around. In other
    words, the oxidative stress suppresses the thyroid. This is at least
    one of the major reasons for the "obesity epidemic." Once the thyroid
    is suppressed (by oxidative stress), metabolism slows, and you get fat.
    I eat as much sugar, butter, coconut product, fruit, dark chocolate,
    cheese, yogurt, etc. as I like, and yet at 40, I'm thin as a rail,
    while my friends and family, who eat typical high unsaturated fat and
    oxidized cholesterol diets, are either overweight or obese. This is
    simple stuff, if you know a little biochemistry and physiology. My
    book, which should be out in less than a year, will explain all of this
    in the simplest terms possible, so that anyone interested can
    understand exactly what's going on.


    i
     
  3. Laurie

    Laurie Guest

  4. Robert

    Robert Guest

  5. montygram

    montygram Guest

    What in the world are you trying to say here? I'll make it clear: are
    you unaware of what suppresses the thyroid? And if so, are you aware
    of the thyroid's role in metabolism? And if so, are you aware of what
    happens when metabolism is slowed significantly? You seem to be the
    most aggressively ignorant person who has ever posted here. Go ahead
    and show us that you are not.
     
  6. Robert

    Robert Guest

    "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > What in the world are you trying to say here? I'll make it clear: are
    > you unaware of what suppresses the thyroid? And if so, are you aware
    > of the thyroid's role in metabolism? And if so, are you aware of what
    > happens when metabolism is slowed significantly? You seem to be the
    > most aggressively ignorant person who has ever posted here. Go ahead
    > and show us that you are not.
    >

    Suppresses the thyroid?
    "We aimed to determine whether patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism "
    Let me show you my ignore here just a little bit about the thyroid.
    Hyperthyroidism is an autoimmune disease involving antibody damage to the
    organ. The antibody mimics the TSH that binds to the TSH receptor and is
    known as a thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin. The release of the thyroxin
    causes the symptoms of hyperthyroidism and it is called graves disease.
    In hypothyroidism the autoantibody causes damage to the organ and not the
    receptor with an initial high release of thyroxin with subsequent damage to
    the organ and diminishing release of the hormone.
    In both diseases you see high levels of microsomal antibodies and
    anti-thyroglobulin antibodies which damage the organ.
    The end result is antibody induced damage which terminates with like all
    cell death various lipid degenerative changes.
    Fatty degradation of cells is normal and common.
    Looking a damaged cells and looking for oxidative stress is ??????
    Why not look at red blood cells that are coated with antibody and check for
    oxidative stress?
    Give me a break
     
  7. montygram

    montygram Guest

    Note to the last post:

    I did not realize that Robert was talking about the link posted by
    Laurie. I'm not sure what Robert was getting at, but I thought he was
    commenting upon one of my posts. I'll apologize for being harsh, but I
    thought he was being sarcastic. I took a quick look at that web page
    Laurie posted, and it has a bunch of abstracts on it. Some of them
    were useful, others were not. In my upcoming book, I will explain how
    an overall framework can be used to make sense of all the abstracts,
    reports, and claims out there. In the meantime, remember than a
    linoleic acid molecule is a linoleic acid molecule, regardless of
    whether it came from an animal or a plant. At the level of
    biochemistry, that is what matters. At the nutritional science level,
    you get such molecules in your body by eating a complex package of
    molecules, some of which are unique to certain plants or animals, and
    some of which are "generic," like linoleic acid. So, while linoleic
    acid (an omega 6 fatty acid) is not something you want more than trace
    amounts of in your diet, if it comes from lard, it has no antioxdiant
    protection, whereas if it comes from good quality nuts, it does. This
    is very important for maintaining health.
     
  8. Robert

    Robert Guest

    "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Note to the last post:



    Cesk Fysiol. 2003 Feb;52(1):34-41. Related Articles, Links


    [Lipid metabolism in atherogenesis]

    [Article in Czech]

    Bobkova D, Poledne R.

    Laborator pro vyzkum aterosklerozy, Centrum experimentalniho vyzkumu chorob
    srdce a cev, IKEM, Praha.

    Lipoprotein (LP) metabolism plays a pivotal role in atherogenesis. Breakdown
    of triglyceride (TG) rich lipoproteins, both of exogenous--chylomicrones and
    endogenous--very low density lipoproteiny (VLDL) produces remnant
    lipoproteins after repeated action of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Atherogenity
    of remnant lipoprotein has been proved. Also atheroprotective high density
    lipoproteins (HDL) are produced from surface of TG rich lipoproteins during
    their lipolysis. Protective role of HDL particles in atherogenesis is
    manifested by reverse cholesterol transport from all extrahepatic cells to
    the liver including cells of the arterial wall. Plasma concentration of
    atherogenic low density lipoproteins (LPL) is regulated by the production
    rate of VLDL in the liver on the one hand and their utilization by selective
    LDL receptors (mainly in the liver) on the other hand. Number of functioning
    LDL receptors is regulated genetically (gene for own LDL receptor and gene
    for both ligands--apoprotein B and apoprotein E) and also by environmental
    factors. Diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol and rich in dietary
    fibres increases number of LDL receptors and consequently decreases LDL
    cholesterol concentration. Monocytes entering arterial wall when intravasal
    and then subendothelial concentration of LDL is increased absorb LDL and
    predominantly oxidized LDL by scavenger receptors. During this repeated
    process they are changed to macrophages, residual macrophages and foam
    cells. Production of foam cells represents a starting point in atherogenesis
    but their high presence is typical also for advanced vulnerable
    atherosclerotic lesions, which are prone to rupture producing clinical
    complication--myocardial infarction and stroke.

    PMID: 12693188 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
     
  9. montygram

    montygram Guest

    In almost all cases of adult onset "diseases," excess biochemical
    activity (usually in the form of AA metabolites) causes dysfunction.
    The evidence is so overwhelming that it's actually funny. Do some
    www.pubmed.com searches.

    Here are a couple of recent ones:

    Cell Biochem Funct. 2003 Dec;21(4):325-30.

    Oxidative damage and antioxidant enzyme activities in experimental
    hypothyroidism.

    Yilmaz S, Ozan S, Benzer F, Canatan H.

    Department of Biochemistry, College of Veterinary Medicine, Firat
    (Euphrates) University, Elazig 23119, Turkey. [email protected]

    Free radicals are now well known to damage cellular components. To
    investigate whether age and thyroid level affect peroxidation speed, we
    examined the levels of malondialdehyde and antioxidant enzyme
    activities in different age groups of hypothyroid rats. Hypothyroidism
    was induced in 30- and 60-day-old Wistar Albino rats by the i.p.
    administration of propylthiouracil (10 mg kg(-1) body weight) for 15
    days. While malondialdehyde levels of 30- or 60-day-old hypothyroid
    rats were increased in liver, they were decreased in the tissues of the
    heart and thyroid. While glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity
    levels did not change in heart, brain and liver tissues of 30-day-old
    rats, they increased in brain and heart tissues of 60-day-old
    experimental groups, but decreased in the liver. Catalase activities
    decreased in the liver and heart of rats with hypothyroidism, but
    increased in erythrocytes. In control groups while malondialdehyde
    levels increased in brain, heart and thymus with regard to age, they
    decreased in plasma. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase
    activities were not affected by age in tissues of the thymus, thyroid
    and brain, but they were decreased in the heart tissue. The changes in
    the levels of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities
    which were determined in different tissues of hypothyroid rats indicate
    a cause for functional disorder of these tissues. Moreover, there may
    be changes depending on age at lipid peroxidation and antioxidant
    enzyme activity levels. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.



    Indian J Exp Biol. 2003 Nov;41(11):1334-7.

    Changes in lipid peroxidation and free radical scavengers in kidney of
    hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats.

    Sawant BU, Nadkarni GD, Thakare UR, Joseph LJ, Rajan MG.

    Laboratory Nuclear Medicine Section, Isotope Group, (BARC), C/o Tata
    Memorial Centre Annexe, Parel, Mumbai 400 012, India.
    [email protected]

    Kidney weight was significantly decreased in hypothyroidism (induced by
    Na131I administration) and increased in hyperthyroidism (induced by
    thyroxine treatment) as compared to control in female Wistar rats. The
    tissue lipid peroxidation level remained unchanged in hyperthyroid rats
    but significantly increased in hypothyroid rats. Superoxide dismutase
    was decreased in both experimental groups but more so in hyperthyroid
    rats. Catalase was reduced significantly in hyperthyroid rats but
    remained unaffected in hypothyroid rats. Tissue glutathione peroxidase
    (GPx) activity was increased while reduced glutathione levels remained
    unaltered in both hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rats. Plasma GPx
    activity was significantly low in both the hypothyroid and hyperthyroid
    rats. The results suggest alterations in the oxidative stress in
    hypothyroid and hyperthyroid rat kidneys with concomitant changes of
    free radical scavengers.
     
  10. Robert

    Robert Guest

    "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In almost all cases of adult onset "diseases," excess biochemical
    > activity (usually in the form of AA metabolites) causes dysfunction.
    > The evidence is so overwhelming that it's actually funny. Do some


    Propylthiouracil is used to kill the thyroid in hyperthyroidism and
    thyroxine is used to treat hypothyroidism.

    What else are they suggesting for hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism?

    Nothing? Thank you. Instead or rats maybe they can work their way up to dogs
    in a few years.
     
  11. Laurie

    Laurie Guest

    "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > ..., remember than a linoleic acid molecule is a linoleic acid molecule,
    > regardless of whether it came from an animal or a plant.

    ....
    > So, while linoleic acid is not something you want more than trace amounts
    > of in your diet, *if it comes from lard*, it has no antioxdiant
    > protection, whereas if *it comes from good quality nuts*, it does.

    Self contradiction; a sure method to upgrade one's credibility.

    Laurie
     
  12. Laurie

    Laurie Guest

    "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I took a quick look at that web page
    > Laurie posted, and it has a bunch of abstracts on it.

    Why don't you take an -honest- look, and try refuting any concept there
    with facts and logic, not insults?

    Laurie
     
  13. montygram

    montygram Guest

    Laurie: exactly what is your claim? I'll take on all comers, but you
    have to clearly articulate your ideas. If you are having difficulty
    understanding a point I a making, you need to explain exactly what the
    problem is.

    Robert: Thank you for reiterating what MattLB and myself have been
    posting here for a few years now (concerning oxidized cholesterol).
    Otherwise, I don't know what you're getting at. I'm not going to do
    the research for you. If I happen to come across an abstract that
    appears to possibly satisfy you, I'll post it. Otherwise, go ahead and
    subject your thryoid to all the oxidative stress you wish.
     
  14. Thanks for this great thread, which has enabled me to identify and block a
    bunch of crossposting idiots and trolls.

    A
     
  15. Pizza Girl

    Pizza Girl Guest

    I don't think many of them are seeing your posts anymore. You are posting
    your snips in vain.

    "Andrew Heenan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Thanks for this great thread, which has enabled me to identify and block a
    > bunch of crossposting idiots and trolls.
    >
    > A
    >
    >
     
  16. John Riggs

    John Riggs Guest

    You too, eh?


    "Andrew Heenan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    | Thanks for this great thread, which has enabled me to identify and block a
    | bunch of crossposting idiots and trolls.
    |
    | A
    |
    |
     
  17. Laurie

    Laurie Guest

    "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Laurie: exactly what is your claim? I'll take on all comers, but you
    > have to clearly articulate your ideas.


    =====
    repeat post:

    "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > ..., remember than a linoleic acid molecule is a linoleic acid molecule,
    > regardless of whether it came from an animal or a plant.

    ....
    > So, while linoleic acid is not something you want more than trace amounts
    > of in your diet, *if it comes from lard*, it has no antioxdiant
    > protection, whereas if *it comes from good quality nuts*, it does.

    Self contradiction; a sure method to upgrade one's credibility.

    Laurie
    ======

    Clearly-articulated enough?? Clearly-articulated enough the first time
    it was posted to completely ignore it?
    But, let me be even more clear; people who contradict themselves have NO
    credibility.

    Laurie






    If you are having difficulty
    > understanding a point I a making, you need to explain exactly what the
    > problem is.
    >
    > Robert: Thank you for reiterating what MattLB and myself have been
    > posting here for a few years now (concerning oxidized cholesterol).
    > Otherwise, I don't know what you're getting at. I'm not going to do
    > the research for you. If I happen to come across an abstract that
    > appears to possibly satisfy you, I'll post it. Otherwise, go ahead and
    > subject your thryoid to all the oxidative stress you wish.
    >
    >
     
  18. Robert

    Robert Guest

    "Laurie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Laurie: exactly what is your claim? I'll take on all comers, but you
    > > have to clearly articulate your ideas.

    >
    > =====
    > repeat post:
    >
    > "montygram" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > ..., remember than a linoleic acid molecule is a linoleic acid molecule,
    > > regardless of whether it came from an animal or a plant.

    > ...
    > > So, while linoleic acid is not something you want more than trace

    amounts
    > > of in your diet, *if it comes from lard*, it has no antioxdiant
    > > protection, whereas if *it comes from good quality nuts*, it does.

    > Self contradiction; a sure method to upgrade one's credibility.
    >
    > Laurie
    > ======


    Sounds like a contradiction to me plain and simple.
    To Monty, peoples bodies and tissues are exposed to oxidants every minute of
    the day and there are anti-oxidant systems that the body already has. In
    addition the body produces a vast amount of oxidants and free radicals
    generated by it's use of oxygen so they are localized within each cell in
    addition to those oxidants chemicals the cell is bathed in outside the cell.
    With a minute damage to the cell by any known mechanism of injury then the
    cell collapses because it can not resist that oxidative stress. To measure
    oxidative changes in a damaged cell is a joke.It proves that the cell was
    damaged and not that the primary defect was a result of oxidative stress.
    You just don't get it.


    >
    > Clearly-articulated enough?? Clearly-articulated enough the first

    time
    > it was posted to completely ignore it?
    > But, let me be even more clear; people who contradict themselves have

    NO
    > credibility.
    >
    > Laurie
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > If you are having difficulty
    > > understanding a point I a making, you need to explain exactly what the
    > > problem is.
    > >
    > > Robert: Thank you for reiterating what MattLB and myself have been
    > > posting here for a few years now (concerning oxidized cholesterol).
    > > Otherwise, I don't know what you're getting at. I'm not going to do
    > > the research for you. If I happen to come across an abstract that
    > > appears to possibly satisfy you, I'll post it. Otherwise, go ahead and
    > > subject your thryoid to all the oxidative stress you wish.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  19. MMu

    MMu Guest

    >> *if it comes from lard*, it has no antioxdiant protection, whereas if *it
    >> comes from good quality nuts*, it does.


    > Self contradiction; a sure method to upgrade one's credibility.


    please read up on antioxidants and antioxidant protection, then post.
    thanks.
     
  20. MMu wrote:
    > please read up on antioxidants and antioxidant protection, then post.




    More crossposted horseshit.
     
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