Hypothetical car-bike interaction

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Fritz M, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 15:06:47 -0400, "Matt O'Toole"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Rick Onanian wrote:
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>> To one-up that, Australia has drive-through liquor stores!
    > >> These exist in the US, too, at least in Massachusetts.

    > >
    > >I'll have a look when I'm up there tomorrow. Is that what they call a

    "packie?"
    >
    > I've never heard that term, but I'll assume that it's short for
    > "package store". For the life of me, I can't understand why liquor
    > stores are called "package stores", but I guess it's a regional
    > thing.


    It may be a military derived thing. They're still called 'package stores' or
    Class VI at mil bases stores all over the world.

    http://www.yourdictionary.net/package_store.html
    "1. package store, liquor store, off-licence -- a store that sells alcoholic
    beverages for consumption elsewhere"

    - packaged to drink elsewhere, instead of drinking it here.

    > I live in Rhode Island, where I _haven't_ seen any
    > drive-through liquor stores (or "packies").


    Here in SW Ohio, there are quite a few drive thru's and drive ups. Some gas
    stations have a drive up window.

    I could probably count 3 or 4 within a couple of miles.

    Pete
     


  2. >Anybody care to explain the odd term for such stores?

    Local ordinances often forbid the carrying of alcoholic beverages on
    a "to go" basis openly, they must be "packaged", e. g. carried in brown
    paper bags, etc.

    Hence a "package store" sells ABs for consumption off premise.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________
    ------------------"Buddy Holly, the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  3. On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 17:54:32 -0400, Rick Onanian <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I've never heard that term, but I'll assume that it's short for
    >"package store". For the life of me, I can't understand why liquor
    >stores are called "package stores", but I guess it's a regional
    >thing. I live in Rhode Island, where I _haven't_ seen any
    >drive-through liquor stores (or "packies").
    >
    >Anybody care to explain the odd term for such stores?


    My understanding of the term is that it applied at least originally to
    stores that had off-premise liquor sales only, therefore everything
    left in a package - no bottles or drinks sold for consumption on
    premises.

    Drive throughs IMO are a small subset of package stores. In North
    Carolina I was at a real drivethrough - you never had to leave your
    car and you drove through the middle of what looked like a converted
    car wash. There was a place in Maryland that once sold driveup - you
    pulled up to a window and never left your car. They stopped the
    service for liability reasons according to the restaurant manager.

    Interestingly, there seems to be some support for open containers in
    vehicles, at least in areas that have a lot of heavy drinkers. IIRC, a
    study in Wyoming (where some liquor stores don't bother to carry
    fifths) indicated that no open containers meant that the heavy
    drinkers simply consumed more before they began driving and drove
    drunker than if they could have an open container. Seemed like
    something that Seagrams would have paid for...

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  4. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > DRS wrote:
    >> "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> DRS wrote:
    >>>> "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> news:[email protected]
    >>>>
    >>>> [...]
    >>>>
    >>>>> have a great deterrent, too -- they print your name in the paper
    >>>>> when you're arrested for drunk driving, in a column called "Drunk
    >>>>> and In Jail." I'm not kidding.
    >>>>
    >>>> In which state is that? Not in the one in which I live.
    >>>
    >>> NSW, circa 1980, when they first started doing it. My friend in
    >>> Queensland says they still do.

    >>
    >> We don't do it in Victoria and my guess would be most states don't do
    >> it either.

    >
    > It would never fly here (US), that's for sure -- innocent until
    > proven guilty, and all that.


    Given the lack of sub judice rules in US jurisprudence and the subsequent
    'trial by public' shenanigans by all concerned that would get them
    imprisoned here on contempt of court charges, I find the irony in your
    contention almost unbearable. All marked Australian police vehicles carry
    portable breathalyzers, there's none of this sobriety test rubbish. Those
    who were named failed the breathalyzer. If they truly want to challenge it
    in court they are entitled to have blood tests done by both a police doctor
    and their own, but few bother since the breathalyzers are ordinarily very
    accurate. So they are in fact no more "innocent until proven' guilty than
    someone who was booked for speeding or somesuch - it doesn't apply unless
    they challenge it in court.

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  5. loki

    loki Guest

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > DRS wrote:
    > > "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> DRS wrote:
    > >>> "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>> news:[email protected]
    > >>> [...]
    > >>>> have a great deterrent, too -- they print your name in the paper
    > >>>> when you're arrested for drunk driving, in a column called "Drunk
    > >>>> and In Jail." I'm not kidding.
    > >>>
    > >>> In which state is that? Not in the one in which I live.
    > >>
    > >> NSW, circa 1980, when they first started doing it. My friend in
    > >> Queensland says they still do.

    > >
    > > We don't do it in Victoria and my guess would be most states don't do
    > > it either.

    >
    > It would never fly here (US), that's for sure -- innocent until proven

    guilty,
    > and all that.


    Kobe Bryant, Phil Specter, Michael Jackson and Robert Blake would be
    interested to know that their arrests cannot be reported in the media as
    they have not yet been convicted.

    --
    'You talk too much
    I can't beleive the things that you say.'
    -george thorogood
     
  6. Tom Beattie

    Tom Beattie Guest

    On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 15:06:47 -0400, "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Rick Onanian wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 10:33:42 -0400, "Matt O'Toole"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> To one-up that, Australia has drive-through liquor stores!

    >>
    >> These exist in the US, too, at least in Massachusetts.

    >
    >I'll have a look when I'm up there tomorrow. Is that what they call a "packie?"
    >
    >Matt O.
    >

    In RI, there's one in Hoxsie. You order at a window and someone
    brings it outside for you.
    Been that way for awhile.
    TomB
     
  7. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:2jeh12F10qe0hU1[email protected]
    > >>>
    > >>>> have a great deterrent, too -- they print your name in the paper
    > >>>> when you're arrested for drunk driving, in a column called "Drunk
    > >>>> and In Jail." I'm not kidding.
    > >>>

    >
    > It would never fly here (US), that's for sure -- innocent until proven

    guilty,
    > and all that.
    >

    They do it in our local newspaper (a Pioneer Press newspaper, near Chicago).

    It doesn't have a nice colorful name, but under "police blotter" there are
    names and addresses of people who were arrested for various offenses,
    including drunk driving.

    These people are still innocent, but their arrest is a matter of public
    record and can be publicized.
     
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