Hypoxic tent

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by Dr.Ferrari, Oct 21, 2002.

  1. Dr.Ferrari

    Dr.Ferrari New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    anyone here have experience periodizing the use of their hypoxic tent?<br /><br />
     
    Tags:


  2. admin

    admin Guest

    [quote author=Dr.Ferrari link=board=18;threadid=2534;start=0#21792 date=1035253015]<br />anyone here have experience periodizing the use of their hypoxic tent?<br />[/quote]<br /><br />No <br /><br />BTW nice choice of nickname ;D ;)
     
  3. Vo2

    Vo2 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2001
    Messages:
    2,166
    Likes Received:
    5
    Click here for the official HTS website.
     
  4. Dr.Ferrari

    Dr.Ferrari New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    good info! guys should stop spending $$$$$ on bikes an get a tent instead!<br /><br />altitude training / hypoxic training update from go2altitude - Read Message<br /><br />
     
  5. Dr.Ferrari

    Dr.Ferrari New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    finally! for some reason couldnt cut &amp; paste from my email. ignore all the =20 or e=20's <br /><br /><br />ALTITUDE: THE STORY CONTINUES=20<br />Text by Rod Cedaro (Consultant Exercise Physiologist)=20<br /><br />Mid way through 1999 I was invited to participate as the senior coach at a=<br /> IOC Triathlon Solidarity Camp organised by the International Triathlon Un=<br />ion (ITU)=2E The camp was conducted on the famed Big Island of Hawaii and =<br />coincided with the ITU's first foray into Hawaii with the staging of the W=<br />orld Cup event there - where Australian triathletes Greg Welch and Michell=<br />ie Jones claimed victory=2E Running along side, and after the IOC Solidari=<br />ty Camp, was a high altitude camp coordinated by Dr=2E Doug Hiller a found=<br />ing member of the famous &quot;Lab Man&quot; research group=2E Over the years Doug, =<br />who is now the Chairman of the ITU Medical Committee, has worked with exer=<br />cise scientist, Mary O'Toole PhD from the United States gathering physiolo=<br />gical and psychological information on various facets of triathlon competi=<br />tion and training=2E The purpose of this camp was to assess the viability =<br />of the notion of &quot;sleep-high, train-low&quot; altitude training in the &quot;real&quot; w=<br />orld, with the view to possibly building a high altitude residential camp =<br />on the Big Island=2E=20<br />Fourteen athletes (eight men and six women, aged between 19-35 years of ag=<br />e) from New Zealand, Australia, the USA, Mexico and Sierra Leone, all spec=<br />ialising in Olympic distance triathlon, participated in the 30 day study w=<br />hereby they lived in a military barracks at altitude (2100 metres) approxi=<br />mately 12 hours per day and commuted down to sea level each day to train a=<br />nd simply &quot;hang out&quot; at the beach and seaside cafes in Kona, before headin=<br />g back up to altitude in the evening=2E=20<br />Prior to the commencement of this investigation all athletes underwent a c=<br />omprehensive battery of physiological tests to determine base line informa=<br />tion of VO2max (bike and run), blood chemistry (looking at hemoglobin (Hb)=<br /> and hematocrit (Hct) levels) and body composition via a DEXA body scan=2E=<br /> These tests were repeated weekly for a total of five tests=2E The athlete=<br />s then acted as their own &quot;control group&quot; and completed their own training=<br /> programs for the duration of the study=2E=20<br />Results of this investigation were published in abstract form in Medicine =<br />and Science in Sports and Exercise: 32(5) 1220, S251, May 2000=2E The inve=<br />stigators found on average a 7=2E9% improvement in VO2max for treadmill ru=<br />nning, power to weight ratio (watts to kilograms) increased on average 21=2E=<br />5% over the five week period=2E Hb rose consistently from a baseline to we=<br />ek four by an average of 5=2E5%=2E Hct peaked in week three of the investi=<br />gation at 4=2E8% higher than what the athletes started with=2E Reticulocyt=<br />e (newly formed red blood cells) increased in volume by 53=2E7% over the d=<br />uration of the study indicating a major increase in red cell production an=<br />d release from the bone marrow=2E When one considers that majority of the =<br />oxygen transported around the body is bound to red blood cells, the implic=<br />ation of increasing the number of available red cells becomes apparent fro=<br />m a performance perspective=2E=20<br />Lean muscle mass, as measured by the DEXA unit, was found to actually decr=<br />ease during the first two weeks of the investigation, but then increased b=<br />ack towards baseline levels by week four=2E Overall, the eight male athlet=<br />es and four of the six females were found to respond positively to the alt=<br />itude exposure and live-high, train-low regimen=2E &quot;Improvement&quot; was defin=<br />ed as a greater than 2% increase in VO2max in running and/or on the bike=2E=<br /> The improvements appeared to be strongly tied to changes in the various b=<br />lood parametres that indicated an improved ability to absorb and transport=<br /> oxygen around the body=2E=20<br />Improvements of the magnitude experienced in Hawaii are highly significant=<br /> to performance at an elite level where even minor changes can mean the di=<br />fference between placing on the podium and finishing mid-field in an inter=<br />national standard event=2E As a participant, or rather support team member=<br /> at the camp (i=2Ee=2E I coached one of the athletes that participated and=<br /> drove the athletes 45-60 kilometres each way up and down the mountain to =<br />train and sleep), it became apparent that although the benefits of &quot;sleepi=<br />ng-high and training-low&quot; are becoming irrefutable in relation to performa=<br />nce, there are a number of major practical concerns related to transportin=<br />g athletes backwards and forwards (approximately one hour and a half each =<br />way) when using conventional altitude training practices (i=2Ee=2E A mount=<br />ain)=2E=20<br />This is where altitude simulation devices such as the GO2 Altitude Hypoxic=<br />ator and Altipower devices have found their niche - basically they have al=<br />l the upsides of altitude training without the hassle of actually getting =<br />there=2E It is only a matter of time before &quot;altitude training&quot; for seriou=<br />s endurance athletes in the comfort of their own home becomes the norm rat=<br />her than the exception=2E=20<br />
     
  6. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2002
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think some basic training would be a more effective and cheaper way of improving performance!<br /><br />Doesn't altitude have negative effects as well?
     
  7. Rhodent

    Rhodent New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2002
    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    0
    The point behind the Hypoxic tent is that you get the advantages of altitude (i.e. lung stuff and etc) without the disadvantages (Inability to train properly).<br /><br />Unfortunately doesn't do us up here in Jo'burg much good, we need oxygen while training, already got the hypoxic tent advantage from our altitude
     
  8. admin

    admin Guest

    [quote author=Rhodent link=board=18;threadid=2534;start=0#21902 date=1035532185]<br />Unfortunately doesn't do us up here in Jo'burg much good, we need oxygen while training, already got the hypoxic tent advantage from our altitude<br />[/quote]<br />You could always ride around with an iron lung strapped to your back ;D
     
Loading...
Loading...