i am BACK! (training run ramble)

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Nina Stoessinge, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. Today I officially kissed Nina the Slug goodbye and welcomed Nina the Athlete back. Feels good. :)

    I headed out in the early evening, when it was still light and warm out, with a gentle breeze that
    cooled things down a bit. I was heading for a new running destination: the Horseshoe Lake. This
    wonderfully tranquil little lake just outside the city used to be a mining pit of some sort and was
    filled up with water when it was no longer needed. I eyed it on the map and it looked just about the
    same distance as my usual longish run (which is 8mi).

    The first 3 miles were uneventful, didn't feel very easy even though I just had 2 days of rest, and
    weren't, er, scenic, leading through an industrialized part of town where I was the only pedestrian
    anywhere around. To make things worse, I missed the first turn for the lake and went a bit too far,
    but finally, after a bit of looking around in a quiet settlement of little suburban houses, found
    this crunchy path that, as I figured, must lead to the lake. It wound on and on and I was wondering
    if this run was gonna turn really good or if I was gonna miss this lake -

    Then I crossed this tiny little hill and out of nowhere, there was the lake. Stretching out before
    me, wide and blue and just gently rippled by the breeze. It was breathtaking. I stopped dead, and
    must have made some sort of surprised little sound, as the youngsters sunbathing by the lake gave me
    a surprised look :)

    I set off to run around the lake on a very narrow dirt trail. Met a few dog-walkers, a few cyclists
    and a few sunbathers, but most of the time, I was alone. The path wound up and down little hills,
    disappeared, reappeared, diverged into even smaller trails, which reunited again. But I was always
    running right next to the water, which shone so very blue, lit up by the slanting sun. I was
    cruising. It was bliss.

    After a couple of miles or so, the trail wound into a totally deserted little forest, got thinner
    and thinner. I was just hoping it wouldn't disappear, and at that moment, a duck took off from just
    a couple of feet ahead of me! A duck? I thought. Water? And indeed, the trail wound its way into the
    swamp, a few steps were pretty soggy, I was running among the reeds and saw a stork lift off into
    the air just ahead -

    Then, back into the trees, running just a foot beside the water, which was crystal clear. It was
    sooo tempting to stick my feet in, but they had no time, they were running.

    After six miles, I took a gel and worried a little about the trail being much longer; my longest
    distance in the past weeks had been 7.5! But after that gel, when I was cruising next to the water
    again, I realized how GOOD it was to feel that strain in my legs, and started pushing a little,
    gently. And that was the moment when that sentence popped into my mind: nina the slug has left my
    body. This is the return of nina the athlete. I felt strong. Challenged. And up for it. And "ran -
    alltheway - home" (isn't this in some modern poem?)

    10 miles it was. And now I'm really worked. And it is still great to be a runner.

    Thanks for reading.

    nina
     
    Tags:


  2. Chris Smith

    Chris Smith Guest

    Farewell to the slug. Thanks for providing a virtual run, nina. Great to get to experience it
    through your eyes and my legs don't feel tired at all! chris

    nina stoessinger wrote:

    > Today I officially kissed Nina the Slug goodbye and welcomed Nina the Athlete back. Feels good. :)
    >
    > I headed out in the early evening, when it was still light and warm out, with a gentle breeze that
    > cooled things down a bit. I was heading for a new running destination: the Horseshoe Lake. This
    > wonderfully tranquil little lake just outside the city used to be a mining pit of some sort and
    > was filled up with water when it was no longer needed. I eyed it on the map and it looked just
    > about the same distance as my usual longish run (which is 8mi).
    >
    > The first 3 miles were uneventful, didn't feel very easy even though I just had 2 days of rest,
    > and weren't, er, scenic, leading through an industrialized part of town where I was the only
    > pedestrian anywhere around. To make things worse, I missed the first turn for the lake and went a
    > bit too far, but finally, after a bit of looking around in a quiet settlement of little suburban
    > houses, found this crunchy path that, as I figured, must lead to the lake. It wound on and on and
    > I was wondering if this run was gonna turn really good or if I was gonna miss this lake -
    >
    > Then I crossed this tiny little hill and out of nowhere, there was the lake. Stretching out before
    > me, wide and blue and just gently rippled by the breeze. It was breathtaking. I stopped dead, and
    > must have made some sort of surprised little sound, as the youngsters sunbathing by the lake gave
    > me a surprised look :)
    >
    > I set off to run around the lake on a very narrow dirt trail. Met a few dog-walkers, a few
    > cyclists and a few sunbathers, but most of the time, I was alone. The path wound up and down
    > little hills, disappeared, reappeared, diverged into even smaller trails, which reunited again.
    > But I was always running right next to the water, which shone so very blue, lit up by the slanting
    > sun. I was cruising. It was bliss.
    >
    > After a couple of miles or so, the trail wound into a totally deserted little forest, got thinner
    > and thinner. I was just hoping it wouldn't disappear, and at that moment, a duck took off from
    > just a couple of feet ahead of me! A duck? I thought. Water? And indeed, the trail wound its way
    > into the swamp, a few steps were pretty soggy, I was running among the reeds and saw a stork lift
    > off into the air just ahead -
    >
    > Then, back into the trees, running just a foot beside the water, which was crystal clear. It was
    > sooo tempting to stick my feet in, but they had no time, they were running.
    >
    > After six miles, I took a gel and worried a little about the trail being much longer; my longest
    > distance in the past weeks had been 7.5! But after that gel, when I was cruising next to the water
    > again, I realized how GOOD it was to feel that strain in my legs, and started pushing a little,
    > gently. And that was the moment when that sentence popped into my mind: nina the slug has left my
    > body. This is the return of nina the athlete. I felt strong. Challenged. And up for it. And "ran -
    > alltheway - home" (isn't this in some modern poem?)
    >
    > 10 miles it was. And now I'm really worked. And it is still great to be a runner.
    >
    > Thanks for reading.
    >
    > nina
     
  3. Duns Scotus

    Duns Scotus Guest

    Bummer. I ran at lunch -- so I can't run again after reading your inspirational post.

    Good on you. Glad you're back (tho you can never really leave).

    I might poke along the river on my Friday run and see if I can't find some new trails myself.

    Now, make sure you recover properly. :)

    Scott

    nina stoessinger wrote:
    > <nice scenic run deleted> 10 miles it was. And now I'm really worked. And it is still great to be
    > a runner.
    >
    > Thanks for reading.
    >
    > nina
    >
    >
     
  4. >Today I officially kissed Nina the Slug goodby

    Bummer! That slime coating was good lube for my eliptical trainer.

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - (_!_)
    OO
     
  5. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    Nina,

    way to go on the great long run. i, too, am reaching for longer runs again, after a hiatus from them
    over winter. i envy you the new and beautiful scenery (and weather!) where you are. i still plug
    away at the same old route... and deep down, i know i should change that route... maybe drive
    somewhere and explore new terrain. and i'll have to remember to bring a gel along when i get to
    doing over an hour again.

    thanks for the inspiring report... and keep on running,

    Cam
     
  6. Vincent Chan

    Vincent Chan Guest

    Sounds like a really good run.

    Today was my return, as well. (Warning: random musings ahead.) I'd stopped running right around my
    birthday at the end of January to spend more time working with the robotics team. The team ended up
    being myself, my friend, and a frosh he knew. Spent about four weeks not running for that, and then
    I was just feeling lazy for another four weeks. A week off for preparing and attending competition.
    Another week off for logistics work and other stuff like that. That was a good experience, and I
    think losing ten weeks of running was worth it, though I'm sure I'll pay for it soon.

    Monday, I planned how we're going to build the marching band props for next year. (I don't march,
    because a- it's a real band-nerd thing to do b-I'm running XC.) Tuesday, I played ultimate frisbee.
    (We play twice a week, so I've been keeping somewhat active.)

    So today, I finally found time for a real run. Did a four miler today in the neighborhoods
    surrounding my school. We're in a historical district, and I swear these houses have all been around
    since the sixties, at least. I had to run by myself, because the track team had a meet today. I was
    hurting about a mile and a half into it, sadly enough, but pushing through that and getting to
    halfway really put something back into me. I picked up the pace a bit for the return run, extending
    it a bit by taking three extra turns through a neighborhood, rather than going straight. Finally,
    down the last street... I picked it up, imagining the end of a crosscountry race. My friends yelling
    at me, my coach yelling at me. I kicked it in, right up the steps and through the gate where the
    distance track team was stretching.

    It was a good run, though being too short for the fatigue. I've got a triathlon in just five weeks,
    so I've really got to get going with training. The rubber-legs feeling I had while I sat and watched
    the track team for half an hour was great. They ache a bit now, but I'm sure that with a night's
    rest I'll be fine. Another run tomorrow, though it should be rather short.

    With a bit of pain and suffering, I'll be a runner again soon. Such is the price of an offseason.

    --Vincent
     
  7. >Bummer. I ran at lunch -- so I can't run again after reading your inspirational post.
    >
    >Good on you. Glad you're back (tho you can never really leave).
    >
    >I might poke along the river on my Friday run and see if I can't find some new trails myself.
    >
    >Now, make sure you recover properly. :)
    >
    >Scott
    >

    How long you going to pretend to be a scot? Or to be learning the pipes? You're a phony.

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - (_!_)
    OO
     
  8. >Today I officially kissed Nina the Slug goodbye and welcomed Nina the Athlete back. Feels good. :)

    Woo hoo! Congrats! Hugs! <dancing around>

    Nina's back Nina's back Nina's back Yahoo ...

    --
    Brian P. Baresch Fort Worth, Texas, USA Professional editing and proofreading

    If you're going through hell, keep going. --Winston Churchill
     
  9. Duns Scotus

    Duns Scotus Guest

    Let's go for a run.

    Bill-always hard-Rodgers wrote:
    >
    > How long you going to pretend to be a scot? Or to be learning the pipes? You're a phony.
    >
    > Bill R.
    >
    > =============> - -- - (_!_)
    > OO
     
  10. Ed Prochak

    Ed Prochak Guest

    Vincent Chan wrote:
    > Sounds like a really good run.
    >
    > Today was my return, as well. (Warning: random musings ahead.) I'd stopped running right around
    > my birthday at the end of January to spend more time working with the robotics team. The team
    > ended up being myself, my friend, and a frosh he knew. Spent about four weeks not running for
    > that, and then I was just feeling lazy for another four weeks. A week off for preparing and
    > attending competition. Another week off for logistics work and other stuff like that. That was a
    > good experience, and I think losing ten weeks of running was worth it, though I'm sure I'll pay
    > for it soon.
    >
    > Monday, I planned how we're going to build the marching band props for next year. (I don't march,
    > because a- it's a real band-nerd thing to do b-I'm running XC.) Tuesday, I played ultimate
    > frisbee. (We play twice a week, so I've been keeping somewhat active.)
    >
    > So today, I finally found time for a real run. Did a four miler today in the neighborhoods
    > surrounding my school. We're in a historical district, and I swear these houses have all been
    > around since the sixties, at least. I had

    I haven't thought of houses that are only 40+years old as Historical. or did you mean 1860's ??? 8^)

    > to run by myself, because the track team had a meet today. I was hurting about a mile and a half
    > into it, sadly enough, but pushing through that and getting to halfway really put something back
    > into me. I picked up the pace a bit for the return run, extending it a bit by taking three extra
    > turns through a neighborhood, rather than going straight. Finally, down the last street... I
    > picked it up, imagining the end of a crosscountry race. My friends yelling at me, my coach yelling
    > at me. I kicked it in, right up the steps and through the gate where the distance track team was
    > stretching.
    >
    > It was a good run, though being too short for the fatigue. I've got a triathlon in just five
    > weeks, so I've really got to get going with training.

    Seems a close date. Don't hurt yourself getting ready.

    > The rubber-legs feeling I had while I sat and watched the track team for half an hour was great.
    > They ache a bit now, but I'm sure that with a night's rest I'll be fine. Another run tomorrow,
    > though it should be rather short.
    >
    > With a bit of pain and suffering, I'll be a runner again soon. Such is the price of an offseason.
    >
    > --Vincent
    >
    >

    Thanks Vincent for the sharing and the bit of amusement.

    --
    Ed Prochak running http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/ netiquette http://www.psg.com/emily.html
    --
    "Two roads diverged in a wood and I I took the one less travelled by and that has made all the
    difference." robert frost
     
  11. >Woo hoo! Congrats! Hugs! <dancing around>

    PUT YOUR PANTS ON PERVERT!

    Bill R.

    =============> - -- - (_!_)
    OO
     
  12. Vincent Chan

    Vincent Chan Guest

    > Leave it to you Ed to reply to a chink. Were about to nuke the slanty eyed little geeks, and your
    > helping them get fit so they fight us if they
    survive
    > the inital blast.

    Odd, I thought we were dealing with the North Koreans at the moment?

    And, either way, I won't have to survive any blast. I'm just as much an American, if not more, as
    any Yank on this ng.

    Bill, I didn't expect anything this ignorant from you... You're getting better at this
    trolling stuff.

    --Vincent
     
  13. Vincent Chan

    Vincent Chan Guest

    > I haven't thought of houses that are only 40+years old as Historical. or did you mean
    > 1860's ??? 8^)

    Well, the "historic" district incorporates just a bit of the city. The buildings aren't that old; my
    school's only been around for eighty-some years. A lot of it has been modernized. It's just we call
    any streets that were AROUND then historic.

    > Seems a close date. Don't hurt yourself getting ready.

    I'm sure that within a week I'll be back in relatively good shape. Besides, I'll deal with just
    being really slow, since I don't usually medal anyway.

    --Vincent
     
  14. "Duns Scotus" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Bummer. I ran at lunch -- so I can't run again after reading your inspirational post.

    *g* save & reread. :)

    > Now, make sure you recover properly. :)

    i did! next run's tomorrow. i'm very much looking forward to it.

    thanks to everyone who replied, i'm always jazzed when somebody actually reads my ramblings :D

    nina
     
  15. "Cam Wilson" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > way to go on the great long run. i, too, am reaching for longer runs again, after a hiatus from
    > them over winter.

    great! It's amazing to watch one's endurance grow back, ain't it? :)

    > i envy you the new and beautiful scenery (and weather!) where you are. i still plug away at the
    > same old route... and deep down, i know i should change that route... maybe drive somewhere and
    > explore new terrain.

    I'd absolutely recommend that. It makes such an amazing difference. I love that "exploration" factor
    involved in long new routes... also one major cool thing about races.

    Speaking of which, I might do a 10.7 k a week from tomorrow. It's over an hour away by train,
    though. Hmmm.

    By the way, the weather's now ugly again. I wanted to do a bike tour with some friends today, but we
    ended up staying inside and decorating easter eggs, heh.

    cheers, nina
     
  16. Vincent Chan

    Vincent Chan Guest

    > Thank you Vincent! I must be getting better if I got to you. Don't North Koreans have slanty eyes
    > too? I always wanted to make it with an oriental
    chic,
    > got any sisters?

    Oh, you didn't get to me. Just the ignorance level went up. I didn't think it was possible to be
    that ignorant... but then again, I naturally tend towards intellectual types. Yes, Koreans have
    slanty eyes and yellow skin, too. And they grow rice, just like chinks. I'm an only child, so I
    don't have any sisters. Besides, I don't think an Asian girl would go well with you... they get
    aggravated when anyone's smarter than they are or stupider than they are... there's really no hope
    with them.

    But what do I know? I'm just your typical genius Asian kid who has a souped up Civic but can't drive
    worth crap. <g>

    --Vincent
     
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