I am ready to be a productive contributor

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Dr. Steven Walk, May 30, 2003.

  1. As you may have noticed, I have been on a week long sabbatical to collect my thoughts and retrain my
    behaviour patterns. I am a changed person and am ready to reenter the multisport community as a
    productive, contributing member. It is my sincere wish to put the past behind and look forward to
    the future.

    I promise not to troll, talk in gibberish, slander others, or misbehave. As a token of good measure,
    I would like to post a legitimate triathlon question. It is because of this issue that perhaps I
    acted like such an arse.

    "How does one get over training malaise?" I haven't felt like training the last few months. My
    running miles are down, I'm not swimming anymore, and have a general disinterest in training
    right now.

    Suggestions appreciated.

    Sincerely,

    Steven
     
    Tags:


  2. Jkmsg

    Jkmsg Guest

    OK, Stephen...I'll take the plung and give it a shot. First of all, if you are sincere about your
    changes, then I will say that a lot of respect is gained when an individual admits to mistakes and
    decides to make changes for the good. You might be pleasantly surprised just how much attention that
    gains. Congratulations upon choosing a positive outlook toward life (in general).

    As for your training malaise, it's not that uncommon provided that is what it it truely is and not a
    symptom of other problems. If you trained hard or trained for a long time, then burn out is a very
    likely outcome. If that is the case, it seems what you need to is add back the fun part. Sometimes
    that requires a person to step back and re-evaluate what made it fun in the first place. When you
    find those things which adds positive and good feelings about training, then the goals that you
    might wish to achieve can be easily obtained and determined.

    On the otherhand, if your trainings problems are only a symptom of other issues that might effect
    your senses of self-worth or self-esteem, you might consider finding help. That is not admitting to
    be ill, but rather an admition of willingness to change for the better. It's a good thing to find
    help. Self diagnosis can be a very tricky thing (and difficult to do). But rest assured, athletic
    activity is a BIG positive for any type of depression or just general poor self-motivation. In
    simpler terms, physical activity and training is a method by which many people take control of
    their lives.

    Chances are your just in a slump... what triggered that slump can be crucial to determining the
    right direction in which to find a solution. Finding a reason will help... but, finding a solution
    is sometimes simple and sometimes complicated. In either case, the important part is that you
    realize there seems to be a problem and it's reflected in your training habits.

    The simple solution is to put the fun back into training. Or in other words, take the stress out
    of training. The complex solution will require much more investigation. The only thing you could
    do to make the problem worse is stop all athletic activity. That would only add stress to your
    activity. However, it is good to reduce your level of activity or find that activity (even if it's
    not triathlons)that adds fun to your life. Once the incentive is back... the rest will take care
    of itself.

    We are all creators of a social nature... we don't typically just do an athletic event and not
    expect some sort of feed back from others. Without good feedback from friends, relatives or family,
    any activity can seem insignificant. Alienation of ourselves is a sure fire way of creating a vacuum
    that can result in lack of motivation. So, I guess fun means you must include others in a positive
    way. It's called sharing (and, that can be very scarey sometimes). Good Luck and Congratulations in
    your new positive direction.

    FWIW Joe M

    [email protected] (Dr. Steven Walker) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > As you may have noticed, I have been on a week long sabbatical to collect my thoughts and retrain
    > my behaviour patterns. I am a changed person and am ready to reenter the multisport community as a
    > productive, contributing member. It is my sincere wish to put the past behind and look forward to
    > the future.
    >
    > I promise not to troll, talk in gibberish, slander others, or misbehave. As a token of good
    > measure, I would like to post a legitimate triathlon question. It is because of this issue that
    > perhaps I acted like such an arse.
    >
    > "How does one get over training malaise?" I haven't felt like training the last few months. My
    > running miles are down, I'm not swimming anymore, and have a general disinterest in training
    > right now.
    >
    > Suggestions appreciated.
    >
    > Sincerely,
    >
    > Steven
     
  3. This is a very powerful response and one that I will have to carefully review and take to heart.
    Thank you for taking the time to share.

    Steven

    [email protected] (jkmsg) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > OK, Stephen...I'll take the plung and give it a shot. First of all, if you are sincere about your
    > changes, then I will say that a lot of respect is gained when an individual admits to mistakes and
    > decides to make changes for the good. You might be pleasantly surprised just how much attention
    > that gains. Congratulations upon choosing a positive outlook toward life (in general).
    >
    > As for your training malaise, it's not that uncommon provided that is what it it truely is and not
    > a symptom of other problems. If you trained hard or trained for a long time, then burn out is a
    > very likely outcome. If that is the case, it seems what you need to is add back the fun part.
    > Sometimes that requires a person to step back and re-evaluate what made it fun in the first place.
    > When you find those things which adds positive and good feelings about training, then the goals
    > that you might wish to achieve can be easily obtained and determined.
    >
    > On the otherhand, if your trainings problems are only a symptom of other issues that might effect
    > your senses of self-worth or self-esteem, you might consider finding help. That is not admitting
    > to be ill, but rather an admition of willingness to change for the better. It's a good thing to
    > find help. Self diagnosis can be a very tricky thing (and difficult to do). But rest assured,
    > athletic activity is a BIG positive for any type of depression or just general poor
    > self-motivation. In simpler terms, physical activity and training is a method by which many people
    > take control of their lives.
    >
    > Chances are your just in a slump... what triggered that slump can be crucial to determining the
    > right direction in which to find a solution. Finding a reason will help... but, finding a solution
    > is sometimes simple and sometimes complicated. In either case, the important part is that you
    > realize there seems to be a problem and it's reflected in your training habits.
    >
    > The simple solution is to put the fun back into training. Or in other words, take the stress out
    > of training. The complex solution will require much more investigation. The only thing you could
    > do to make the problem worse is stop all athletic activity. That would only add stress to your
    > activity. However, it is good to reduce your level of activity or find that activity (even if it's
    > not triathlons)that adds fun to your life. Once the incentive is back... the rest will take care
    > of itself.
    >
    > We are all creators of a social nature... we don't typically just do an athletic event and not
    > expect some sort of feed back from others. Without good feedback from friends, relatives or
    > family, any activity can seem insignificant. Alienation of ourselves is a sure fire way of
    > creating a vacuum that can result in lack of motivation. So, I guess fun means you must include
    > others in a positive way. It's called sharing (and, that can be very scarey sometimes). Good Luck
    > and Congratulations in your new positive direction.
    >
    > FWIW Joe M
    >
    >
    > [email protected] (Dr. Steven Walker) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > As you may have noticed, I have been on a week long sabbatical to collect my thoughts and
    > > retrain my behaviour patterns. I am a changed person and am ready to reenter the multisport
    > > community as a productive, contributing member. It is my sincere wish to put the past behind and
    > > look forward to the future.
    > >
    > > I promise not to troll, talk in gibberish, slander others, or misbehave. As a token of good
    > > measure, I would like to post a legitimate triathlon question. It is because of this issue that
    > > perhaps I acted like such an arse.
    > >
    > > "How does one get over training malaise?" I haven't felt like training the last few months. My
    > > running miles are down, I'm not swimming anymore, and have a general disinterest in training
    > > right now.
    > >
    > > Suggestions appreciated.
    > >
    > > Sincerely,
    > >
    > > Steven
     
  4. Pueri Laeta

    Pueri Laeta Guest

    [email protected] (Dr. Steven Walker) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > As you may have noticed, I have been on a week long sabbatical to collect my thoughts and retrain
    > my behaviour patterns. I am a changed person and am ready to reenter the multisport community as a
    > productive, contributing member. It is my sincere wish to put the past behind and look forward to
    > the future.
    >
    > I promise not to troll, talk in gibberish, slander others, or misbehave. As a token of good
    > measure, I would like to post a legitimate triathlon question. It is because of this issue that
    > perhaps I acted like such an arse.
    >
    > "How does one get over training malaise?" I haven't felt like training the last few months. My
    > running miles are down, I'm not swimming anymore, and have a general disinterest in training
    > right now.
    >
    > Suggestions appreciated.
    >
    > Sincerely,
    >
    > Steven
     
  5. Leave me alone, evil person. If you want to utter profanities at me, do so by sending me an e-mail.
    Please don't soil the newsgroup anymore. Unlike the fake e-mail address you're hiding behind, I use
    an actual address. I'm a new man, so buzz off.

    Steven

    [email protected] (Pueri laeta) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
     
  6. Well, I guess you know now what "taking the plunge" with this troll gets you. It was a nice
    quiet week.

    From: jkmsg ([email protected]) Subject: Re: I am ready to be a productive contributor

    OK, Stephen...I'll take the plung and give it a shot. First of all, if you are sincere about your
    changes, then I will say that a lot of respect is gained when an individual admits to mistakes and
    decides to make changes for the good. You might be pleasantly surprised just how much attention that
    gains. Congratulations upon choosing a positive outlook toward life (in general).
     
  7. "jkmsg" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > OK, Stephen...I'll take the plung and give it a shot. First of all, if you are sincere about your
    > changes, then I will say that a lot of respect is gained when an individual admits to mistakes and
    > decides to make changes for the good. You might be pleasantly surprised just how much attention
    > that gains. Congratulations upon choosing a positive outlook toward life (in general).
    >
    > As for your training malaise, it's not that uncommon provided that is what it it truely is and not
    > a symptom of other problems. If you trained hard or trained for a long time, then burn out is a
    > very likely outcome. If that is the case, it seems what you need to is add back the fun part.
    > Sometimes that requires a person to step back and re-evaluate what made it fun in the first place.
    > When you find those things which adds positive and good feelings about training, then the goals
    > that you might wish to achieve can be easily obtained and determined.
    >
    > On the otherhand, if your trainings problems are only a symptom of other issues that might effect
    > your senses of self-worth or self-esteem, you might consider finding help. That is not admitting
    > to be ill, but rather an admition of willingness to change for the better. It's a good thing to
    > find help. Self diagnosis can be a very tricky thing (and difficult to do). But rest assured,
    > athletic activity is a BIG positive for any type of depression or just general poor
    > self-motivation. In simpler terms, physical activity and training is a method by which many people
    > take control of their lives.
    >
    > Chances are your just in a slump... what triggered that slump can be crucial to determining the
    > right direction in which to find a solution. Finding a reason will help... but, finding a solution
    > is sometimes simple and sometimes complicated. In either case, the important part is that you
    > realize there seems to be a problem and it's reflected in your training habits.
    >
    > The simple solution is to put the fun back into training. Or in other words, take the stress out
    > of training. The complex solution will require much more investigation. The only thing you could
    > do to make the problem worse is stop all athletic activity. That would only add stress to your
    > activity. However, it is good to reduce your level of activity or find that activity (even if it's
    > not triathlons)that adds fun to your life. Once the incentive is back... the rest will take care
    > of itself.
    >
    > We are all creators of a social nature... we don't typically just do an athletic event and not
    > expect some sort of feed back from others. Without good feedback from friends, relatives or
    > family, any activity can seem insignificant. Alienation of ourselves is a sure fire way of
    > creating a vacuum that can result in lack of motivation. So, I guess fun means you must include
    > others in a positive way. It's called sharing (and, that can be very scarey sometimes). Good Luck
    > and Congratulations in your new positive direction.
    >
    > FWIW Joe M
    >
    >
    > [email protected] (Dr. Steven Walker) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > As you may have noticed, I have been on a week long sabbatical to collect my thoughts and
    > > retrain my behaviour patterns. I am a changed person and am ready to reenter the multisport
    > > community as a productive, contributing member. It is my sincere wish to put the past behind and
    > > look forward to the future.
    > >
    > > I promise not to troll, talk in gibberish, slander others, or misbehave. As a token of good
    > > measure, I would like to post a legitimate triathlon question. It is because of this issue that
    > > perhaps I acted like such an arse.
    > >
    > > "How does one get over training malaise?" I haven't felt like training the last few months. My
    > > running miles are down, I'm not swimming anymore, and have a general disinterest in training
    > > right now.
    > >
    > > Suggestions appreciated.
    > >
    > > Sincerely,
    > >
    > > Steven
     
  8. Okay, my friend! I will train more.

    Thanks you,

    Steven

    On Tue, 03 Jun 2003 15:27:52 GMT, "Miguel A. Qui–ones" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"
     
  9. Thank you, Andrews. I am trying real hard to not be a troll anymore. I will disregard the fake ecce
    if he tries to bother the group. What are you training for this years?

    Steven

    On 2 Jun 2003 21:50:44 -0700, [email protected] (Andrew Coleman) wrote:

    >Well, I guess you know now what "taking the plunge" with this troll gets you. It was a nice
    >quiet week.
    >
    >From: jkmsg ([email protected]) Subject: Re: I am ready to be a productive contributor
    >
    >OK, Stephen...I'll take the plung and give it a shot. First of all, if you are sincere about your
    >changes, then I will say that a lot of respect is gained when an individual admits to mistakes and
    >decides to make changes for the good. You might be pleasantly surprised just how much attention
    >that gains. Congratulations upon choosing a positive outlook toward life (in general).
     
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