I hate hills........help!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Scott, Jun 24, 2003.

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  1. Scott

    Scott Guest

    Any advice will be appreciated. Here is the deal....... I recently moved from Atlanta where I rode
    the Silver Comet trail. Not alot of hills. Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really taken
    the enjoyment out of riding for me. What used to great day of riding 4-6 hours is now 45 minutes of
    "lord please help me make it up this hill, and the next one too". On the flat trail I could pace
    myself and make a day of it. With the hills it is blow up and recover. Note..I am not attacking
    either, trying to pace. Repeated blow up and recover is killing me. Just not fun anymore. Thanks for
    the advice, Scott FYI- 33yo, 190 lbs
     
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  2. Mikeyankee

    Mikeyankee Guest

    You didn't say where "here" is.

    I started riding as an adult in my late 40's and went through a phase of hating hills like you. But
    then I saw how much they helped my riding.

    I'm 58 now and live in an area where there are few flat rides, and I love it.

    My cycling mentor was fond of saying, "Hills build strength. Headwinds built character. You
    need both."

    Mike Yankee

    (Address is munged to thwart spammers. To reply, delete everything after "com".)
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Scott"
    <@earthlink.net> writes:
    > Any advice will be appreciated. Here is the deal....... I recently moved from Atlanta where I rode
    > the Silver Comet trail. Not alot of hills. Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really
    > taken the enjoyment out of riding for me. What used to great day of riding 4-6 hours is now 45
    > minutes of "lord please help me make it up this hill, and the next one too". On the flat trail I
    > could pace myself and make a day of it. With the hills it is blow up and recover. Note..I am not
    > attacking either, trying to pace. Repeated blow up and recover is killing me. Just not fun
    > anymore. Thanks for the advice, Scott FYI- 33yo, 190 lbs

    Maybe this might inspire ya: http://www.ChainReaction.com/hills.htm

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 01:01:32 +0000, wrote:

    > Any advice will be appreciated. Here is the deal....... I recently moved from Atlanta where I rode
    > the Silver Comet trail. Not alot of hills. Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really
    > taken the enjoyment out of riding for me.

    Several things. Make sure you have gears that are low enough, and use them. Where are you? What sort
    of gears do you have?

    Another thing is to learn to take the hills as a challenge, rather than a PITA.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems. _`\(,_ | -- Paul Erdos
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  5. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    > I started riding as an adult in my late 40's and went through a phase of
    hating
    > hills like you. But then I saw how much they helped my riding.
    >
    > I'm 58 now and live in an area where there are few flat rides, and I love
    it.
    >
    > My cycling mentor was fond of saying, "Hills build strength. Headwinds
    built
    > character. You need both."
    >
    >
    > Mike Yankee

    one of my mentors used to say (well, still does, come to think of it) "Pain is weakness leaving
    your body."

    Pat in Texas
     
  6. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Scott" <@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Any advice will be appreciated. Here is the deal....... I recently moved from Atlanta where I rode
    > the Silver Comet trail. Not
    alot
    > of hills. Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really taken the enjoyment
    out
    > of riding for me. What used to great day of riding 4-6 hours is now 45 minutes of "lord
    > please help me make it up this hill, and the next one too". On the flat trail I could pace
    > myself and make a day of it. With the hills it is blow up and recover. Note..I am not
    > attacking either, trying
    to
    > pace. Repeated blow up and recover is killing me. Just not fun anymore. Thanks for the advice,
    > Scott FYI- 33yo, 190 lbs

    "It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster." - Greg LeMond

    Pete
     
  7. On 25 Jun 2003 01:10:44 GMT, [email protected] (MikeYankee) wrote:

    >My cycling mentor was fond of saying, "Hills build strength. Headwinds built character. You
    >need both."

    Amazingly enough, several good (as in Tour de France mountain stage and even overall winners) racers
    have come from the Netherlands, where the biggest mountain in the land rises less than a full 1000
    feet above sea level (admittedly, much of it is 10-20 feet below the sea, so that add's a little to
    the heightmeters).

    Jasper
     
  8. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Scott"
    <@earthlink.net> says...
    > Any advice will be appreciated. Here is the deal....... I recently moved from Atlanta where I rode
    > the Silver Comet trail. Not alot of hills. Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really
    > taken the enjoyment out of riding for me. What used to great day of riding 4-6 hours is now 45
    > minutes of "lord please help me make it up this hill, and the next one too". On the flat trail I
    > could pace myself and make a day of it. With the hills it is blow up and recover. Note..I am not
    > attacking either, trying to pace. Repeated blow up and recover is killing me. Just not fun
    > anymore. Thanks for the advice,

    Get some lower gears so you can sit down and spin easily up the hill. You'll probably find yourself
    increasing your speed up the hills relatively quickly as you get used to them.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  9. Review Boy

    Review Boy Guest

    "Scott" <@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently moved from Atlanta where I rode the Silver Comet trail. Not
    alot
    > of hills. Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really taken the
    enjoyment out
    > of riding for me.<snip> Scott

    Hello Scott -

    Our esteemed colleagues' responses to your question so far have included excellent advice, but in my
    humble opinion have missed one imporant point: Do not start with hills so steep and long (for your
    current fitness level) that you come to think of bicycling as not being fun. That is a good way to
    end up as an ex-cyclist.

    Start with smaller hills.

    I find that if I ride the same, small hill(s) frequently, it starts getting much easier and more fun
    after a few weeks, and I then start wanting to tackle a tougher hills.

    It also helps to smile while you're climbing. Of course, you have to be a behavioralist to
    believe in that.

    Finally, if you can find a riding partner, that will help a lot. If you are chatting (between huffs
    and puffs) while climbing, it is amazing how much less you will think about the discomfort, and how
    smaller a given hill seems.

    Good luck.
     
  10. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    > >My cycling mentor was fond of saying, "Hills build strength. Headwinds
    built
    > >character. You need both."

    > Amazingly enough, several good (as in Tour de France mountain stage and even overall winners)
    > racers have come from the Netherlands, where the biggest mountain in the land rises less than a
    > full 1000 feet above sea level (admittedly, much of it is 10-20 feet below the sea, so that add's
    > a little to the heightmeters).
    >
    > Jasper

    Just because they come from the Netherlands doesn't mean they train there. Texas has had some
    excellent skiers and I doubt any of them train in Dallas.

    Pat
     
  11. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    "Scott" wrote:

    > Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really taken the enjoyment out of riding for me. What
    > used to great day of riding 4-6 hours is now 45 minutes of "lord please help me make it up this
    > hill, and the next one too".

    This worked for me, maybe it will for you:

    When I started back riding two years ago, I was terrible on the hills. I would get passed by
    virtually everyone. Having a rather stubborn disposition, my reaction was to ride as many of the
    steepest and longest hills as I could, as often as possible. Now, I almost never get passed on the
    hills, and climbing is a real pleasure. I'm doing about 25,000-30,000 feet of climbing per week.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  12. Tanya Quinn

    Tanya Quinn Guest

    > Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really taken the enjoyment out of riding for me. What
    > used to great day of riding 4-6 hours is now 45 minutes of "lord please help me make it up this
    > hill, and the next one

    Ah but the thrill of going down the hill that was torturous to go up makes it worth it doesn't it?

    Try a lower gear? Also with practice the same hill does get easier. Where you might have to stop and
    rest partway up now in a few weeks you'll be wondering why you found it hard.

    Tanya
     
  13. John

    John Guest

    I recently moved from Illinois to Arkansas, so I know some of the pain you're feeling. Things that
    have helped me:

    Intervals to build strength. Climbing only some of the hill (my route allows me to turn around
    without climbing the whole hill.) Sitting at the rear of the saddle. Patience.

    The hills that gave me the most trouble had more than 200ft of vertical gain in 1/2 mile. It's still
    painful getting to the top, but now I don't have to stop.

    "Scott" <@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Any advice will be appreciated. Here is the deal....... I recently moved from Atlanta where I rode
    > the Silver Comet trail. Not alot of hills. Now there are nothing but dang hills. It has really
    > taken the enjoyment out of riding for me. What used to great day of riding 4-6 hours is now 45
    > minutes of "lord please help me make it up this hill, and the next one too". On the flat trail I
    > could pace myself and make a day of it. With the hills it is blow up and recover. Note..I am not
    > attacking either, trying to pace. Repeated blow up and recover is killing me. Just not fun
    > anymore. Thanks for the advice, Scott FYI- 33yo, 190 lbs
     
  14. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Ride up very slowly; in fact find the steepest hill you can and ride up it as slowly as you can,
    making it a balancing challenge.

    You will find that when you get to the top that you're not tired at all. It may take a while, is
    all. That's physics for you.

    Having proved that there is a too-slow speed and you're not bothered at all by it, obviously it's a
    matter of refining your pacing skills for hills. Go faster but not a lot faster until you get good
    at estimating how hard you ought to be working on hills. The visual cues are different; I myself go
    on breathing but my legs never tire so I can ignore them.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  15. Pat <[email protected]> wrote:
    : one of my mentors used to say (well, still does, come to think of it) "Pain is weakness leaving
    : your body."

    yea, i saw that in a Nike ad.

    good christ. pain is usually my body's (or mind's) way of telling me i'm doing something
    seriously wrong.

    climbing doesn't hurt .. it burns.

    i also like to redefine terms a lot.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  16. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    ...

    > cues are different; I myself go on breathing but my legs never tire so I can ignore them.

    You're lucky; my breathing can handle everything my legs need and more, so it's my legs which give
    out first. I know, I know: ride more! I'm trying, but it's tough to fit into the schedule. I'm
    working on figuring out good routes to rack-and-ride to work, but it's not all organized yet; that
    should help a lot.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  17. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > You're lucky; my breathing can handle everything my legs need and more, so it's my legs which give
    > out first. I know, I know: ride more! I'm trying, but it's tough to fit into the schedule. I'm
    > working on figuring out good routes to rack-and-ride to work, but it's not all organized yet; that
    > should help a lot.

    Actually, that kind of fitness builds more quickly, even though it might hurt more. It's the cardio
    deficits that take a long time to overcome. If you have a good cardio base, gaining strength for
    hills should only take a few weeks, at least to get to where you're comfortable.

    Matt O.
     
  18. Mikeyankee

    Mikeyankee Guest

    >Ride up very slowly; in fact find the steepest hill you can and ride
    up it as slowly as you can, making it a balancing challenge.

    Good advice if one has low enough gearing. If the gear is too big, or the saddle height too low,
    this could be a recipe for knee problems (especially for a rider not accustomed to hills).

    Mike Yankee

    (Address is munged to thwart spammers. To reply, delete everything after "com".)
     
  19. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > You're lucky; my breathing can handle everything my legs need and more, so it's my legs which
    > > give out first. I know, I know: ride more! I'm trying, but it's tough to fit into the schedule.
    > > I'm working on figuring out good routes to rack-and-ride to work, but it's not all organized
    > > yet; that should help a lot.
    >
    > Actually, that kind of fitness builds more quickly, even though it might hurt more. It's the
    > cardio deficits that take a long time to overcome. If you have a good cardio base, gaining
    > strength for hills should only take a few weeks, at least to get to where you're comfortable.

    For normal, everyday riding, I'm in good enough shape for the hills I meet. It's when I try to push
    hard on my normal exercise ride or push a decent time for a 15k TT on my old Schwinn LeTank that my
    legs start complaining, even though my lungs and heart say "we can go at least a _little_ faster". I
    did my first one last Monday (it's part of a summer- long series), and came up with a 29:04. Better
    than I expected, but still not where I'd like to be.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  20. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    > : one of my mentors used to say (well, still does, come to think of it)
    "Pain
    > : is weakness leaving your body."

    Pat

    > yea, i saw that in a Nike ad.
    >
    > good christ. pain is usually my body's (or mind's) way of telling me i'm doing something
    > seriously wrong.
    >
    > climbing doesn't hurt .. it burns.
    >
    > i also like to redefine terms a lot.
    > --
    > david reuteler

    Funny, the guy who told me that several years ago is a Marine....

    Now Nike's stealing from the Marines!

    Climbing is making your muscles extend themselves--microscopic tears in the muscle tissue occur, but
    the tears heal and make the muscles stronger. So, in a weird way, it's good for you!

    Pat in Texas
     
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