I have no idea what bike i have.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by insane, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. insane

    insane New Member

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    Hey guys, i just joined the forum yesterday. I'm a pretty enthusiastic cyclist, and i received a pretty "expensive" bike from my uncle recently. The odd thing is i cannot seem to tell whether its a mountain bike, or something of a hybrid.*Pics Attached*
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    This is a pic of the frame.
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    This is a pic of the tyres "Kenda Blue Groove", supposedly tubeless tires or something no idea what they're really used for.
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    And the front suspension, which i can't seem to find on any other website. Can it be adjusted?
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    You're looking at a low-end full suspension MTB. It's probably a few years old too. It may possibly have been de-badged and resprayed.

    It is highly unlikely that it has ever been worthy to be called an expensive bike by anyone with reasonable knowledge about bikes.

    Kenda blue groove comes in several versions, one of them tubeless. It means just that, with the right prep work these can be run w/o tubes. No tube means you can use lower pressures with less risk of bottoming out punctures or tearing the valve out.
    They're intended for fairly dry and hard track conditions. Mountainbikereview.com has it down as a fairly average tire.

    I can't identify from the pic, but a double crown fork with a threaded headset is an odd beast, someone might recognize it.
    Ther may be some adjustabilty lurking under the top caps, but I wouldn't be too hopeful.
    I think the realistic best hope is that it can be disassembled, which if you're stubborn enough, would give some manner of adjustability by replacing whatever suspensin elements there are inside.
     
  3. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    I would add that this type of bike is designed for off road or trails, however I have seen them used a lot on the road.
    The type of bike you need depends on your type of riding.This is not an effecient road bike but it will work, just don't expect blinding speed from it on the road.
     
  4. insane

    insane New Member

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    Thanks for the help mate. I'm fairly new with bikes, and here in Singapore when a bike's price goes over the $200 range, its actually considered expensive.(We have cheap bikes coming in from all over Asia). So this bike's price tag was said to be $400 now i know, that really isn't expensive when it comes to a good bike.

    And also what do you mean de-badged and resprayed? Again thanks for taking the time to answer my queries.
     
  5. insane

    insane New Member

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    This truly is a pity, i enjoy riding long distances with this bike :( . I haven't really tried off trail or anything cos there aren't many in tiny little Singapore. Plus i haven't learnt basic manouevers such as standing in one spot with out taking your feet of the pedals, bunny hops and wheelies.
     
  6. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Well, it's quite rare to find bikes that haven't got any manufacturer's marking on it at all. And yours hasn't, either on fork or frame. So I'm guessing it has had its decals removed - de-badged.
    Resprayed is more of a guess, but first it's the overall design of the paint job, secondly it's that badges are often hidden under clearcoat, or can generally be tricky to remove entirely w/o damages to the paint. So a respray seems like a possibility.

    it has all the tell-tale marks of "cheap", plastic flatties pedals, noname smooth post v-brakes, cranks that looks like they're plastic over steel cores, rear derailer clamped on behind axle nut.

    But hey, if it does what you want from it - great! You don't have to worry your heart out every time you park it somewhere.
     
  7. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    If you're using it for the road mainly I suggest you get some smoother tires, many seem to like Schwalbe Big Apple. Then ditch that saddle, get a narrower one. The one you have looks awwkwardly wide even in the photo. And if you plan to start jumping it, get another seat post too. the one you have is not recommended for heavy landings.
     
  8. insane

    insane New Member

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    Well if it is supposedly cheap i don't think blowing my savings on upgrading it would be a bright idea. I did get my group set replaced with a Shimano 7 Speed, cos my old group set's shifter was annoying "Picture a shifter that is slightly similar to how you accelerate on motorcycles.". The shifter that i got was EZ fire shifter if i'm not wrong and i think its pretty sweet.

    I'm following your advice on the enthusiatic student cyclist thread btw, that was very informative too! I'll probably save for a hybrid bike.

    It does calm me to a certain extent, that my bike won't get stolen, but the promise i made to my uncle when he gave me the bike was that i would never park it anywhere outside my apartment.

    Thanks for all the advice dabac! :) :) :)
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    First, any bike that can be pedaled down the street is "a good bike" ... maybe, not a great bike, but ...

    The fact that YOU were under the impression that your bike was a nice bike BEFORE encountering contrary (and, correct) observations in this Forum doesn't mean that you shouldn't worry about it being stolen BECAUSE someone else may think that it is nice ... nice enough to steal ...

    So, you should probably continue to maintain your promise to your Uncle and not be casual about where you leave it.

    If you keep/kept the "old" parts that you removed from your bike then you can put them back on in the future ... any "new" components you may buy in the future (e.g., rear derailleur, wheels, whatever) can be transferred to another bike in the future.

    BTW. A vintage or inexpensive full suspension bike is an energy sapper, particularly on the road ... and, in particular if the bike has an older OR inexpensive shock ...

    In the case of your bike, there is little doubt that the rear shock is probably doing more harm than good.

    If that were MY bike and the trails which you may ride in the future are not going to be too technically challenging, then I would remove the rear shock and replace it with a solid steel bar-or-plate (or, steel tube) and thereby create a DIY Hardtail.

    For want of another source, I would use a salvaged 'leaf' spring from an automobile's rear suspension ... an approximately 1" square, steel tube would probably be much better. I might consider using a 1" steel conduit.
    Measure the distance between the shock's mounting holes on the unweighted frame, drill holes in the metal bar/tube, accordingly ...

    If you are using a steel bar/plate, I would reduce the width of the leaf spring (yeah, a very bad initial choice, but I don't have another ready source of appopriately robust steel "plate" to suggest) to about 3cm (only to reduce the weight -- it could be left as-is) ... and, bolt it in place.
    BTW2. A bobbing front fork is an energy sapper, too!
     
  10. insane

    insane New Member

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    Yeah. It ain't a great bike but it gets the job done, don't worry I wouldn't dare leave my bike casually locked up anywhere.

    And yeah it is doing more harm than good, while cycling yesterday, i ran over some rocky terrain to get to a footpath, and i tell you there was a little or no suspension on absorbing the shocks,had to ride with my bum lifted off my seat.
     
  11. tafi

    tafi Member

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    Actually I've seen plenty of these sort of machines with labels warning specifically AGAINST riding them off road. They're designed to look cool (cheaply) without actually being useful.

    The likelyhood of this bike standing any abuse is pretty small. Stricty for fetching milk and bread from the corner shop.
     
  12. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Ok, let me correct my post by saying this bike has an "off road" design. Quality varies as some are very good but expensive and can cost as much a any road bike.
    It's just that this particular one is not one of those.
     
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