I have problems...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bikelyst, Mar 29, 2007.

  1. rdk

    rdk New Member

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    200 posts? Well I'm glad your chain is clean.
     


  2. Bikelyst

    Bikelyst New Member

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    What is that supposed to mean?
     
  3. djk202020

    djk202020 New Member

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    I was wondering that too
     
  4. ABG

    ABG New Member

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    WD-40 contains nearly pure mineral spirits. Mineral spirits are an excellent solvent, cleaner, and degreaser. Although WD-40 is pretty cheap, you can also get mineral spirits in bulk bottles at your local hardware store or department store. I know for a fact that Wal-Mart has it. It's in the same area that similar solvents are, such as paint thinner or acetone (either of which can also be used to effectively clean your chain).

    Mineral spirits aren't particularly environmentally friendly, but my experience is that you can re-use it quite a lot, even if it doesn't look particularly clean. Just let the sediment settle to the bottom after at least a day, and then pour the remaining spirits into a second bottle. Dispose of the sediment.

    A wire brush is a handy thing for cleaning cogs and other hard-to-reach metal areas on your bike. You may also want to pick up a wire brush from your local department store or hardware store (it's easier to use than a rag but a rag will also work). In lieu of a wire brush, an old (or new?) toothbrush can also work for getting in between those cogs and chainwheels.

    Despite what I've heard a few people say here, I don't think that spraying anything under pressure at a bike is a good idea. You could get solvent/degreaser/pressurized water inside your hubs, which are supposed to be greasy. If you accidentally degrease your hubs, bottom bracket, or stem, you could get grinding bearings.

    If you ever want to remove your chain in the future, you may want to buy a chain tool. Park Tools make good ones, and you might be able to get one from your local bike shop, but a good one isn't cheap ($20 or more). Removing your chain using a chain tool can cause stiff links though, which I've had to deal with, which is another can of worms.
     
  5. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Pete, haven't you heard that aceto balsamenico is an excellent biodegradeable degreaser for your chain? Colavita is the best for bikes of course, but any brand will work as long as it's da Modena :)
     
  6. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

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    Nothing wrong with a bit of forum participation.
     
  7. Bro Deal

    Bro Deal New Member

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    Mineral spirits are what I am using these days. I should probably switch to something more eco friendly.
     
  8. garyj

    garyj New Member

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    Mineral spirits is cheap and it works great. Diesel fuel is also good. Use a small paintbrush with the solvent and you will be able to get the grime out of the cassette. If you use a plastic container (like Coolwhip comes in) you can let the chain be submerged at the rear derailer in the solvent while you spin in backwards - the wheel doesn't have to turn that way. You will find the mineral spirits will turn black in seconds. I clean my front and real derailer, sprockets and chain that way often. Be sure to lube it afterwards.
     
  9. Bikelyst

    Bikelyst New Member

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    Thanks for all of the replys, and the help.:)

    I took my bike out, newly cleaned, and after I lubed it up was blown away by how much more efficient we rode together. It felt better than the day I picked it up. Shifting was obviously crisper and overall I felt like we were riding faster.

    For now, I am satisfied w/ using WD40 and some rags. (I really enjoy spending time cleaning in between my cogs, sprockets etc. It lets me spend time with my bike, and I feel like I've accomplished something.:p ) But I will be more careful spraying it, considering that it could get into the bearings.
     
  10. allan42

    allan42 New Member

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    First thing to do in future when this happens is to take the bike home and give it a good hose down. But for now take your chain off and soak it in degreaser, hose it down and then soak it in a good chain lube.(Prolink is very good)As for the rest of the bike, get some citrus based degreaser and mix at 1 in 10 maybe, then use a spray pack to do the whole bike. Hose off and spray all the moving bits with a good spray lube ie.CSR 5.56. There ya go now!
     
  11. rdk

    rdk New Member

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    It means that the "the two smaller cogs (wheels w/ teeth on them) where the chain forms kind of an S shape just below the cassette" are the jockey wheels on the rear derailleur. Just wondering if you spent all your time posting and not reading.

    I'm not usually such a prick. Bad day.
     
  12. Bikelyst

    Bikelyst New Member

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    No problem, I understand. Thanks for the information though. I'm learning:)
     
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