I only eat - uh - normal stuff

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Modom, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. "modom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > That's what the checker at the "super"market told me
    > yesterday as she tried in vain to look up my veggies in
    > her sku list. I'd presented her with:
    >
    > 3 limes ("Are all of these limes? " Yup. "I'm waiting for
    > somebody to show me a kiwi, and I just thought..." Kiwis
    > are furry. "Oh.")
    >
    > 1 poblano chile. (Her tragic look caused me to volunteer
    > its name before the question was formed, but she still
    > couldn't find it on her list. The sacker rescued her.)
    >
    > 1 avocado (got it!)
    >
    > 1 six pack of beer (got it again!)
    >
    > 1 sirloin steak (bar code to the rescue!)
    >
    > 1 bunch cilantro ("Parsley?" Nope.)
    >
    > 1 jicama (ruh-roh... It's a jicama, with a J, I pipe
    > cheerfully and proactively. She searched and searched.
    > "It's not on the list. It should be here between the H's
    > and the K's, but it's not." I guess there weren't any I's.
    > The friendly sacker strikes out, too, so off he trots to
    > the produce section to discover the price. 99 cents, says
    > I, too late.)
    >
    > I try to tell her about jicamas, but her eyes grow sheets
    > of Plexiglass and her posture displays the same lack of
    > attention I've seen in a dachshund with a full belly.
    > Well, I offer brightly, I really put you through a produce
    > test, but this stuff is good. Poblanos are used for chile
    > rellenos. Did you ever have a chile relleno? Her reply is
    > the headline. She lives in Texas.
    >
    > Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?

    pile of shit.
     


  2. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    modom wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 08 Mar 2004 07:40:32 -0500, Nancy Young

    > >modom wrote:

    > >> 3 limes ("Are all of these limes? " Yup. "I'm waiting
    > >> for somebody to show me a kiwi, and I just thought..."
    > >> Kiwis are furry. "Oh.")
    > >
    > >You're saying they sell kiwis there and she can't just
    > >walk over and look at them herself?
    >
    > That was D's observation, as well. The dear child at the
    > register had no interest, no curiosity in her work. Arri
    > and others have pointed out that for her it's just a
    > McJob, which is of course true. But such an utter
    > disinterest in the products she deals with bodes ill for
    > any job she might have now or in the future. Not all jobs
    > are McJobs.

    One thing I can say, growing up I learned one thing ... be
    it work or school, you take it seriously and do a good job.
    I had enough McJobs, I excelled at them even though I was
    only making break even wages, if that. Just saying, I would
    be embarrassed to ask you if limes were kiwis if my job was
    to check groceries.

    Oh, and if anyone cares, grocery cashiers are not necessary
    low paid. Many are union, with good wages and benefits.

    > I'm drifting off topic here, but who among us hasn't had a
    > crappy job at one time or another? One of mine was
    > assembling corrugated boxes in an un-airconditioned steel
    > building one summer in the Dallas area.

    Yikes.

    > It's good to be an artist these days.

    Do you have a website?

    > >Funny, apparently celery root inspired a similar reaction
    > >yesterday. That's okay, if I hadn't seen it on tv, I
    > >wouldn't have known what it was either.

    > Right. I really don't expect most folks to recognize a
    > jicama, even in a grocery store. It was the dully
    > incurious demeanor that concerned me. Not so much for what
    > it meant for my convenience -- actually that part was
    > fairly amusing, like a rough draft of a comedy sketch --
    > but for what it augured for her limited future.

    I know exactly what you're talking about and it is creepy.
    As in, what DO you find interesting, anything? Sure, I've
    seen it in action. And they always chew gum. Grrrr.

    nancy
     
  3. > Right. I really don't expect most folks to recognize a
    > jicama, even in a grocery store. It was the dully
    > incurious demeanor that concerned me. Not so much for what
    > it meant for my convenience -- actually that part was
    > fairly amusing, like a rough draft of a comedy sketch --
    > but for what it augured for her limited future.
     
  4. Default User

    Default User Guest

    George wrote:

    > Yes and good advice for anyone who believes the marketing
    > that the "dell interns" or the "circuit city associates
    > (or whatever they are called)" actually know anything.

    Hey, my niece works for Circuit City (but not one of those
    annoying sales droids).

    Brian Rodenborn
     
  5. On Mon, 08 Mar 2004 11:27:11 -0600, modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 08 Mar 2004 07:40:32 -0500, Nancy Young
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>modom wrote:
    >>>
    >>> That's what the checker at the "super"market told me
    >>> yesterday as she tried in vain to look up my veggies in
    >>> her sku list. I'd presented her with:
    >>>
    >>> 3 limes ("Are all of these limes? " Yup. "I'm waiting
    >>> for somebody to show me a kiwi, and I just thought..."
    >>> Kiwis are furry. "Oh.")
    >>
    >>You're saying they sell kiwis there and she can't just
    >>walk over and look at them herself?
    >
    >That was D's observation, as well. The dear child at the
    >register had no interest, no curiosity in her work. Arri
    >and others have pointed out that for her it's just a McJob,
    >which is of course true. But such an utter disinterest in
    >the products she deals with bodes ill for any job she might
    >have now or in the future. Not all jobs are McJobs.

    The store at the bottom of this building is quite different
    in this department as in other things. There are usually at
    least 6 or 7 knds of hot peppers loose in the produce
    section, and as many wild mushrooms.

    I have never had a checkout person fail to distinguish a
    serrano from a jalapeno, or a bluefoot from a black trumpet.
    Once one of them mistook the origin of a tomato, thereby
    undercharging me (if I hadn't said anything).

    Many of the cashiers have been there since the store opened.
    Turnover is almost nonexistent.

    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a

    Smoking in a bar is like peeing in a punchbowl.
     
  6. When you do find someone doing a deadend job really well, it
    is a joy to see. I remember one young man working the
    checkout counter in the garden department of discount store.
    If he had merely found the bar codes and given change, he'd
    have been doing the job as well as anybody. Instead, he'd
    studied up on all the plants and what people were planting
    and what sorts of fertilizer to use. He chatted about
    customers' purchases as he carried 50# sacks of dirt to
    their cars. He knew his stuff. I asked if he were studying
    landscape design or majoring in botany, chemistry or
    biology. He looked surprised and said he was just in
    highschool. I suggested that he COULD go into landscape
    design or any of those fields. He gave a modest, polite and
    non-commital answer.

    Then there was the busdriver who had an uncanny way of
    recognizing stiff uncomfortable recent grads on their way
    to their first job interviews. They had a way of looking
    like they had on a tie for the first time. She'd pep talk
    them all the way downtown and drop them off at their stop
    calling after them "make sure they know what a fast
    learner you are!"

    I don't generally find it at supermarkets though.

    --Lia
     
  7. Modom

    Modom Guest

    On Mon, 08 Mar 2004 13:24:10 -0500, Nancy Young
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Oh, and if anyone cares, grocery cashiers are not necessary
    >low paid. Many are union, with good wages and benefits.

    The market here in Cow Hill isn't unionized to my
    knowledge. I'm under the impression that my checker works
    for a pittance.
    >
    >> I'm drifting off topic here, but who among us hasn't had
    >> a crappy job at one time or another? One of mine was
    >> assembling corrugated boxes in an un-airconditioned steel
    >> building one summer in the Dallas area.
    >
    >Yikes.
    >
    >> It's good to be an artist these days.
    >
    >Do you have a website?

    www.koyote.com/users/modom/home.html

    I haven't updated it in many months, however, so my work
    looks rather different now.

    Gotta check the silly rib experiment now.

    modom
     
  8. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <6ggn40teru75mkn4eekke25e5gnapgie[email protected]>,
    modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > That's what the checker at the "super"market told me
    > yesterday as she tried in vain to look up my veggies in
    > her sku list. I'd presented her with:
    >
    > 3 limes ("Are all of these limes? " Yup. "I'm waiting for
    > somebody to show me a kiwi, and I just thought..." Kiwis
    > are furry. "Oh.")
    >
    > 1 poblano chile. (Her tragic look caused me to volunteer
    > its name before the question was formed, but she still
    > couldn't find it on her list. The sacker rescued her.)
    >
    > 1 avocado (got it!)
    >
    > 1 six pack of beer (got it again!)
    >
    > 1 sirloin steak (bar code to the rescue!)
    >
    > 1 bunch cilantro ("Parsley?" Nope.)
    >
    > 1 jicama (ruh-roh... It's a jicama, with a J, I pipe
    > cheerfully and proactively. She searched and searched.
    > "It's not on the list. It should be here between the H's
    > and the K's, but it's not." I guess there weren't any I's.
    > The friendly sacker strikes out, too, so off he trots to
    > the produce section to discover the price. 99 cents, says
    > I, too late.)
    >
    > I try to tell her about jicamas, but her eyes grow sheets
    > of Plexiglass and her posture displays the same lack of
    > attention I've seen in a dachshund with a full belly.
    > Well, I offer brightly, I really put you through a produce
    > test, but this stuff is good. Poblanos are used for chile
    > rellenos. Did you ever have a chile relleno? Her reply is
    > the headline. She lives in Texas.
    >
    I haven't run into too many clueless cashiers here in
    Seattle, but there were many in NC and Dallas. I had to make
    sure that every piece of fruit or vegetable had an sku
    sticker on it so there would be no mistakes made.

    Note to Nancy: On the coasts, grocery workers can be
    unionized. That's not the case in Texas or NC.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  9. Tried to slice the avocado but the pit got in the way so
    it's McDs again tonight! Managed to find blood orange and
    rest of stuff, BTW, but New Mexico red chilies not in my
    supermarket. Thai birdseyes are in local Asian market, will
    they do? My plant, which I lovingly cultivated on the
    kitchen windowsill through the winter, finally succumbed.
    I'm devastated, but the Bougainvillea thrives so there is
    hope. We do get EVOO (had to use Google) in these parts
    since there are lots of ITs here (is that PC?)

    Ate faggots (snickers aside, they are made from ground
    liver, pork belly, herbs and wrapped in caul), peas and
    chips last Friday at a friend's home, had to do a number on
    my head, but it was tasty, I must admit. Reminded me of
    haggis and haslet. We had an interesting conversation about
    offal being the food of the poor a generation or three ago.
    Were it not for food factories and 'modern' farming
    practices it's what most of us would be eating today. Mad
    cow, srapie, salmonella, e-coli or offal! What a choice!

    Robin

    "modom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    >
    > Here's a salad idea:
    >
    > Thinly slice about 1/4 medium jicama (peeled). Add a
    > sliced blood orange (don't try to find one in Cow Hill,
    > however), a sliced navel orange, and a sliced avocado.
    > Squeeze half a lime over the above stuff, and add a
    > generous splash EVOO. Add a scant tsp ground New Mexico
    > red chiles. Salt and pepper. Toss. Serve slightly chilled.
    >
    > modom
     
  10. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 19:44:23 -0600, modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    >3 limes ("Are all of these limes? " Yup. "I'm waiting for
    >somebody to show me a kiwi, and I just thought..." Kiwis
    >are furry. "Oh.")

    You forgot to mention that kiwis are brown.
    >
    >1 poblano chile. (Her tragic look caused me to volunteer
    >its name before the question was formed, but she still
    >couldn't find it on her list. The sacker rescued her.)

    Here is a basket of (imaginary) chiles. Identify them.
    >
    >1 bunch cilantro ("Parsley?" Nope.)

    Also known as coriander and Chinese parsley. In appearance,
    quite similar to flat-leafed parsley.
    >
    >1 jicama (ruh-roh... It's a jicama, with a J, I pipe
    >cheerfully and proactively. She searched and searched.
    >"It's not on the list. It should be here between the H's
    >and the K's, but it's not." I guess there weren't any I's.

    Odd that she should have been looking between H and K for
    something you told her begins with J. Oh, J *is* between H
    and K. And so sad she hadn't studied Spanish.
    >
    >Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?

    For the money, you mean toad. There are millions of people
    in this country who've never eaten cilantro or kiwi or
    jicama, and have no idea what they are nor what they look
    like. Ignorance isn't stupidity.
     
  11. Nancy Young wrote:
    > modom wrote:
    >
    > > That's what the checker at the "super"market told me
    > > yesterday as she tried in vain to look up my veggies in
    > > her sku list. I'd presented her with:
    ...
    > Funny, apparently celery root inspired a similar reaction
    > yesterday.

    Chuckle. I've got that reaction when buying beer (10 bottles
    from Belgium no two alike ;^), when buying a goose and a
    rabbit, even when buying bread.

    I'm allergic to wheat, so the loaves I buy doesn't always
    much resemble bread that much. A solid block of rye kernels
    steamed into a brick. Well, the label does call it bread. If
    you can read German and/or Dutch ;^)
     
  12. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Cindy Fuller wrote:

    > Note to Nancy: On the coasts, grocery workers can be
    > unionized. That's not the case in Texas or NC.

    Other places too, like St. Louis.

    Brian Rodenborn
     
  13. Bob

    Bob Guest

    modom wrote:

    > Thinly slice about 1/4 medium jicama (peeled). Add a
    > sliced blood orange (don't try to find one in Cow Hill,
    > however), a sliced navel orange, and a sliced avocado.
    > Squeeze half a lime over the above stuff, and add a
    > generous splash EVOO. Add a scant tsp ground New Mexico
    > red chiles. Salt and pepper. Toss. Serve slightly chilled.

    Oh, that reminds me of the salad I made a couple weeks
    ago; I think I posted it here....checking...yes, I did,
    but I forgot to mention the avocado, so here is the
    amended version:

    After watching the mayo episode of "Good Eats," I thought
    I'd give AB's method a try. When I was FINALLY done
    whisking, I put most of the mayo into a separate container.
    To the tablespoon or so left in the dish, I added more lemon
    juice, some Old Bay, and some Sriracha hot sauce. Having
    received a mandoline for Christmas, I took it out of the shrink-
    wrap and used it to thinly slice a jicama and a seeded
    cucumber, both of which went into the bowl. Then I segmented
    a pink grapefruit, and the segments went in also. Added a
    package of fake crabmeat and tossed to coat everything, then
    added salad greens (frisee, arugula, radicchio, and romaine)
    and tossed again. Peeled and cut an avocado into chunks,
    then scattered the chunks over top of the salad. Tasted and
    realized it needed black pepper, so a few turns of the
    peppermill finished it off.

    Put a pita round in the toaster oven and cooked until it
    inflated and started to turn crisp, then split it and
    stuffed it with the salad. Very nice.

    Bob
     
  14. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

    modom wrote:
    > www.koyote.com/users/modom/home.html
    >
    > I haven't updated it in many months, however, so my work
    > looks rather different now.

    Interesting... I think your talent is better focused on art
    than gluing boxes :)

    --
    John Gaughan http://www.johngaughan.net/
    [email protected]
     
  15. Modom

    Modom Guest

    On Tue, 09 Mar 2004 17:04:30 GMT, Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 19:44:23 -0600, modom
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>3 limes ("Are all of these limes? " Yup. "I'm waiting for
    >>somebody to show me a kiwi, and I just thought..." Kiwis
    >>are furry. "Oh.")
    >
    >You forgot to mention that kiwis are brown.
    >>
    The helpful sacker did that before I could chime in.

    >>1 poblano chile. (Her tragic look caused me to volunteer
    >>its name before the question was formed, but she still
    >>couldn't find it on her list. The sacker rescued her.)
    >
    >Here is a basket of (imaginary) chiles. Identify them.

    I imagine them to be serranos, jalapenos, Anaheims, and
    poblanos. Those are the fresh chiles available at the Cow
    Hill market. There are four varieties of fresh chiles in the
    produce section. The dried chiles available in bulk are
    anchos, chiles japones, arbols, and something they call a
    cascabel, though it looks more like a New Mexico to me.
    >>
    >>1 bunch cilantro ("Parsley?" Nope.)
    >
    >Also known as coriander and Chinese parsley. In appearance,
    >quite similar to flat-leafed parsley.

    True. Not really something I should razz anyone about.
    Except for the aroma. They do smell quite distinct. And they
    don't sell flat-leaf parsley at this store.
    >>
    >>1 jicama (ruh-roh... It's a jicama, with a J, I pipe
    >>cheerfully and proactively. She searched and searched.
    >>"It's not on the list. It should be here between the H's
    >>and the K's, but it's not." I guess there weren't any I's.
    >
    >Odd that she should have been looking between H and K for
    >something you told her begins with J. Oh, J *is* between H
    >and K. And so sad she hadn't studied Spanish.

    Huh? Cow Hill is in Texas. The most common name in town is
    Jose. We Anglos live among many many Latinos. Her store has
    an entire aisle devoted to Hispanic foods. In a town of
    8,000 we have two restaurants where you can get chiles
    rellenos (I notice that you cut the portion of my post about
    rellenos in your reply), carne asada, huevos con chorizo,
    etc. It's less an issue of studying anything academically
    than noticing the world one lives in.
    >>
    >>Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?
    >
    >For the money, you mean toad. There are millions of people
    >in this country who've never eaten cilantro or kiwi or
    >jicama, and have no idea what they are nor what they look
    >like. Ignorance isn't stupidity.

    Mean toad? A Frogleg called a modom a toad!

    Actually, I believe we've failed to communicate on this
    matter. If you are interested, you might look at some of my
    other responses in this thread to get a better understanding
    of my attitude which has little to do with meanness. It's
    not the lack of knowledge, but the lack of inquisitiveness.

    And there are other places to work here besides that market.

    modom
     
  16. Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 19:44:23 -0600, modom
    > <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Odd that she should have been looking between H and K for
    > something you told her begins with J. Oh, J *is* between H
    > and K. And so sad she hadn't studied Spanish.

    Why? (Why Spanish in particular, I mean.)

    I never studied Spanish (chose German instead). Of course,
    I've picked up quite a few Spanish food words along the way,
    just because I'm curious.

    Cindy Hamilton
     
  17. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Tue, 09 Mar 2004 17:39:32 -0600, modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Huh? Cow Hill is in Texas. The most common name in town is
    >Jose. We Anglos live among many many Latinos. Her store has
    >an entire aisle devoted to Hispanic foods. In a town of
    >8,000 we have two restaurants where you can get chiles
    >rellenos (I notice that you cut the portion of my post
    >about rellenos in your reply), carne asada, huevos con
    >chorizo, etc. It's less an issue of studying anything
    >academically than noticing the world one lives in.

    I grew up in Albuq. where we had 30-minute Spanish lessons
    twice a week in 5th and 6th grade. After that, it was an
    elective. Jeez, even kids named Baca and Rodriquez didn't
    speak Spanish. My family went to restaurants rarely and my
    mother didn't cook Mexican food.

    (I left out the rellenos because I didn't want to go over
    every single point. I also left out the beer and avocado.)

    >>>
    >>>Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?
    >>
    >>For the money, you mean toad. There are millions of people
    >>in this country who've never eaten cilantro or kiwi or
    >>jicama, and have no idea what they are nor what they look
    >>like. Ignorance isn't stupidity.
    >
    >Mean toad? A Frogleg called a modom a toad!

    And I thought long and hard about it, too. It's the first
    time I've ever made an ad hominem attack in a newsgroup.
    However, I *do* get stirred up by those who post "look how
    clever I am and how stupid and silly the person who waits on
    me is. Isn't this amusing?" It's *not* amusing. It's mean-
    spirited and ugly.
    >
    >Actually, I believe we've failed to communicate on this
    >matter. If you are interested, you might look at some of my
    >other responses in this thread to get a better
    >understanding of my attitude which has little to do with
    >meanness. It's not the lack of knowledge, but the lack of
    >inquisitiveness.

    Yes, I read how you worked "one summer" in a box factory.
    And when your shift was over, did you explore the factory
    and find out all you could about the process? Or did you
    just want to get the hell out of there? In your own story,
    the clerk was wondering about kiwis, 'though it beats me why
    she couldn't just go look. However, I expect by the end of
    the day, a little extra walking across the store wouldn't be
    a treat. She *was* at least mildly inquisitive, just not
    passionately interested in your jicama chat.

    >And there are other places to work here besides that
    >market.

    Fine. You go back to that store, ask if she's satisfied with
    her job, and if she isn't, tell her you'll find a better one
    for her. And manage her life and education, to boot.
     
  18. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On 10 Mar 2004 06:26:39 -0800, [email protected] (Cindy
    hamilton) wrote:

    >Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >> On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 19:44:23 -0600, modom
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Odd that she should have been looking between H and K for
    >> something you told her begins with J. Oh, J *is* between
    >> H and K. And so sad she hadn't studied Spanish.
    >
    >Why? (Why Spanish in particular, I mean.)

    Jicama is a Spanish word (the plant apparently originated in
    middle or south America). It is pronounced (just in case you
    din't already know) HEE-cah-mah, as a 'J' is pronounced like
    'H' in Spanish. Modom specified that it started with 'J' to
    reduce confusion.
     
  19. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Frogleg wrote:

    > And I thought long and hard about it, too. It's the first
    > time I've ever made an ad hominem attack in a newsgroup.

    Michael Odom strikes me as one of the nicest people here.

    > However, I *do* get stirred up by those who post "look how
    > clever I am and how stupid and silly the person who waits
    > on me is. Isn't this amusing?" It's *not* amusing. It's
    > mean-spirited and ugly.

    I think you're going overboard, reading the situation far
    too harshly. He didn't berate the woman or anything, he just
    told a story about his shopping experience. I thought it was
    interesting and I was surprised that she actually said she
    was waiting for someone to bring her kiwis to check out.

    Okay, I was taken aback, I thought, does this store not
    sell kiwis? If she was at all curious, why not take a spin
    around the produce aisle. I would! People here have
    mentioned many, MANY things that I have made a point to
    seek out next time I was in the grocery store so I'd know
    what they were talking about.

    > >Actually, I believe we've failed to communicate on this
    > >matter. If you are interested, you might look at some of
    > >my other responses in this thread to get a better
    > >understanding of my attitude which has little to do with
    > >meanness. It's not the lack of knowledge, but the lack of
    > >inquisitiveness.
    >
    > Yes, I read how you worked "one summer" in a box factory.
    > And when your shift was over, did you explore the factory
    > and find out all you could about the process? Or did you
    > just want to get the hell out of there? In your own story,
    > the clerk was wondering about kiwis, 'though it beats me
    > why she couldn't just go look. However, I expect by the
    > end of the day, a little extra walking across the store
    > wouldn't be a treat. She *was* at least mildly
    > inquisitive, just not passionately interested in your
    > jicama chat.

    Actually, it should, in my opinion, be mandatory for the
    checkout people to have a pretty good knowledge of the
    produce available in the store. It's part of their job to
    know what it is. They have to check it out. Now, Mike
    probably did not need to know what happened elsewhere in the
    factory, it didn't impact his job. Apples and oranges.

    nancy
     
  20. Modom

    Modom Guest

    I wrote:
    >>>>Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?
    >>>

    Forgleg wrote:
    >>>For the money, you mean toad. There are millions of
    >>>people in this country who've never eaten cilantro or
    >>>kiwi or jicama, and have no idea what they are nor what
    >>>they look like. Ignorance isn't stupidity.
    >>
    I wrote:
    >>Mean toad? A Frogleg called a modom a toad!
    >
    Frogleg wrote:
    >And I thought long and hard about it, too. It's the first
    >time I've ever made an ad hominem attack in a newsgroup.
    >However, I *do* get stirred up by those who post "look how
    >clever I am and how stupid and silly the person who waits
    >on me is. Isn't this amusing?" It's *not* amusing. It's mean-
    >spirited and ugly.

    I suppose it was the overall tenor of my story that got
    under your skin. And while I can see why you may feel called
    upon to defend the common woman from what appears to you to
    have been an assault from an upper-class twit, your attack
    just doesn't seem warrented.
    >>
    I wrote:
    >>Actually, I believe we've failed to communicate on this
    >>matter. If you are interested, you might look at some of
    >>my other responses in this thread to get a better
    >>understanding of my attitude which has little to do with
    >>meanness. It's not the lack of knowledge, but the lack of
    >>inquisitiveness.
    >
    Frogleg wrote:
    >Yes, I read how you worked "one summer" in a box factory.
    >And when your shift was over, did you explore the factory
    >and find out all you could about the process? Or did you
    >just want to get the hell out of there? In your own story,
    >the clerk was wondering about kiwis, 'though it beats me
    >why she couldn't just go look. However, I expect by the end
    >of the day, a little extra walking across the store
    >wouldn't be a treat. She *was* at least mildly inquisitive,
    >just not passionately interested in your jicama chat.

    Some McJob bona fides: After my shift at the box factory, I
    went home and washed the sweat and grime from my body.
    Slammed down some dinner (OBFood) and went to a second job
    dipping ice cream (OBFood). That lasted for about a month
    before exhaustion forced me to quit the second job. It was
    probably just as well since the scabs on my arms from the
    hotmelt caused more than a little worry among the customers
    watching me hand pack their pints of rocky road (OBFood).
    The factory was rather small, so I was aware of the other
    workers' duties and working conditions. Besides being a YMCA
    day camp "counselor", it was my first job and so I wasn't
    aware of the proper pace of work under such conditions. The
    heat was terrible. I remember on my first day when I was
    told to load a pile of wood scraps into a dumpster, an old
    African American man at a saw station cam over and told me
    to slow down or I'd kill myself. It was a rather large pile
    of scraps.

    Some years later, I worked for a little over a year as a
    grease monkey in a university motor pool. Boy can I change a
    tire. And oil changes? I can do them under water. The
    supervisor there finally

    was also very fat and had high blood pressure. I
    bought him donuts (OBFood) every day in a failed, sick
    plot to kill him.

    Next I worked for a little over three years in various
    positions for a community-based service for mentally
    retarded adults. Split shifts making breakfast and dinner
    (OBFood) for semi-independent men living in rental houses;
    working in a sheltered workshop with men and women,
    combining product assembly and life-skills training,
    showering with one man every now and then when he'd soiled
    himself (he was not capable of washing himself), dealing
    with seizures and bizarre behaviors. I never made more than
    $700 a month at that place. But I attended numerous
    workshops on job-related issues to better my performance.

    There are others, but nobody cares.
    >
    I wrote:
    >>And there are other places to work here besides that
    >>market.
    >
    Frogleg wrote:
    >Fine. You go back to that store, ask if she's
    >satisfied with her job, and if she isn't, tell her
    >you'll find a better one for her. And manage her life
    >and education, to boot.

    This doesn't seem to follow. You are talking to an imaginary
    modom, not me.

    modom
     
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